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General News of Monday, 24 May 2021

Source: happyghana.com

Teachers won’t have problems with the absence of textbooks – NaCCA

According to NaCCA, the new curriculum introduced provides teachers with detailed information According to NaCCA, the new curriculum introduced provides teachers with detailed information

The acting Director General of the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NaCCA), John Mensah Anang, says while it is concerned about the absence of textbooks in the markets, it is very confident that teachers will have minimal problems teaching without textbooks.

He reasoned that the new curriculum introduced provides teachers with detailed information that can help them teach students without textbooks.

Speaking to Samuel Eshun on the Happy Morning Show, he expressed: “We are very much concerned about the absence of books in the market because we also have children who attend school and they will all need approved books to use but one major thing that the public must also be aware of is that the teachers wouldn’t have much problems because what they have to teach has been outlined in details in the curriculum with access to the right resources also”.

He shared, however, that one challenge with the absence of textbooks is that students will lack “tool to use as a guide for reinforcement of what the teacher has taught”.

John Mensah Anang was positive that in the age of the internet, students can get information and learn using the internet.

He furthered that NaCCA in partnership with other stakeholders such as the Ghana Library Authority are working hard to ensure the digitization of school resources such as books, etc.

Earlier this year, the Coalition of Concerned Teachers, expressed that teachers and students in the Basic and Junior High Schools are yet to receive teaching and learning materials two years after the introduction of a new curriculum at these levels.

According to the coalition, the unavailability of these materials has affected teaching and learning and can be attributed to the exposure of students to unapproved and stereotypical textbooks.

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