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Entertainment of Saturday, 25 April 2020

Source: www.ghanaweb.com

Rumors are accepted by fools - Becca fights song theft accusation


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While answering how she deals with trolls having been taunted on several occasions by a section of the Ghanaian populace, Becca said she is least perturbed because she finds it awkward to respond to rumors and comments aimed at making her feel less of a person.

“People who troll you are usually your enemies. I don’t think when you love someone so much, you won’t give them the opportunity to explain themselves,” she told MzGee on TV3’s New Day, Friday.

“Sometimes, I’m quiet because I believe that’s the best way to do things. I believe that when you’re quiet about things, it passes... [My way of dealing with trolls is] just silence because I believe that silence is really golden.”

The musician is of the conviction that colleagues join the bandwagon and subject her to vehement attack for reasons best known to them when they are supposed to know better. Regardless, she holds no grudges as she focuses on positivity and forges ahead to chalk successes.

“There might be ordinary people there as well but definitely there’s gonna be some who come from the industry,” she said while adding a phrase which could be attributed to her should a discussion about rumours and how they spread is tabled for discussion.

“Rumours are started by enemies, accepted by fools, and spread by ignorance without confirmation.”

The songstress, accused of bleaching, was recently hit with a song theft allegation following the release of her song ‘No One’. She was said to have sampled South African singer, Sho Madjozi’s, ‘John Cena’ song and trolled on various social media platforms.

Setting the record straight, Becca said the accusation was fueled by ignorance. She explained that ‘No One’ falls under a genre called Gqom beat – an electronic dance music that emerged in the early 2010 from Durban, South Africa - stressing that when people were jabbing her in Ghana, the song was trending at number two in South Africa.

“That’s the irony of life. People are home trolling [me] but my song was number 2 in South Africa. People do not really understand the kind of music I released,” she said. “It sounded like somebody else’s song and so are all Gqom beats. Gqom beats all sound alike. If the song you claim is gqom beat does not sound like all gqom beats, then it’s actually gqom beat.

“The good thing is that I featured one of the main women who are the founders of gqom beat – Busiswa. Would you actually think that she would take weeks and weeks to go through my song and feature if she thought it was a copied song?” she asked.

On whether she was disappointed about the development, Becca responded in the affirmative.

“I was disappointed. I fell it was naivety and I felt like people should have just asked these questions. But people who knew it knew it so I wasn’t really worried about it,” she mentioned.

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