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Charlie Gard: parents end legal fight over critically ill baby
Chris Gard and Connie Yates announce decision as high court judge was preparing to oversee latest round of five-month legal battleCharlie Gard: key questions answeredCharlie Gard’s parents have ended their legal fight over treatment for the critically ill baby, saying that it is “too late” for treatment to work. Chris Gard and Connie Yates announced their decision as a high court judge was preparing to oversee the latest round of a five-month legal battle. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:19:34 GMT)

Fox admits UK unlikely to finalise free trade deal with EU before Brexit - Politics live
Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happenCarwyn Jones’ Today interview - SummaryNo 10 lobby briefing - SummaryLunchtime summary 3.19pm BST This is what Liam Fox said in the Q&A after his speech (see 2.40pm) when he was asked if he would feel comfortable eating chlorine-washed chicken.In a debate which should be about how we make our contribution to global liberalisation and the increased prosperity of both the UK, the US and our trading partners, the complexities of those - the continuity agreements, the short-term gains that we may make, the opportunities we have and our ability to work jointly towards both a free-trade agreement and WTO liberalisation - the British media are obsessed with chlorine-washed chickens, a detail of the very end stage of one sector of a potential free trade agreement. I say no more than that. 2.40pm BST Liam Fox, the international trade secretary, has just finished his speech on trade in Washington. I will post a summary when I’ve seen the text.From the extracts broadcast on Sky and BBC News, it seems that the speech did not mention chlorine-washed chickens. But a Telegraph journalist asked him about this afterwards. Fox does not seem to have appreciated the question.Liam Fox withering on the "British media" as asked if he'd eat a chlorine washed chicken at US event - nb he didn't actually answerLiam Fox tells @nickallen789 that chlorinated chicken is just a "detail" of the wider US/UK post-Brexit free trade deal to be resolvedFox: "We work on premise that the British press corps in Washington never eats American beef or chicken because of their health concerns"Liam Fox: It wld be nice to think we can get full free trade agreement with EU by the end of March 2019 but that would be optimistic #Brexit Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:19:44 GMT)

Jared Kushner confirms Russia meetings but insists: 'I did not collude'
Trump son-in-law releases 11-page statement before Senate appearanceKushner: meeting with Donald Trump Jr and Russian lawyer ‘a waste of time’Jared Kushner, Donald Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, has insisted he “did not collude” with Russia during the presidential election, and dismissed the significance of a meeting with Donald Trump Jr and a Russian lawyer. Related: Jared Kushner sealed real estate deal with oligarch's firm cited in money-laundering case Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:24:41 GMT)

Five injured in chainsaw attack in Swiss town
Old town of Schaffhausen has been sealed off as police search for perpetrator of the attackFive people have been injured, two of them seriously, when a man carrying a chainsaw stormed an office building in the Swiss town of Schaffhausen on Monday morning.The old town of Switzerland’s northernmost city has been sealed off as police continue to search for the perpetrator. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:58:29 GMT)

Richard Dawkins event cancelled over his 'abusive speech against Islam'
Berkeley’s KPFA Radio cancels appearance by evolutionary biologist after learning of his ‘hurtful speech’ against the religion – a charge the author contestsRichard Dawkins has denied using “abusive speech against Islam” after a California radio station cancelled a book event with the scientist, citing his comments on Islam, which it said had “offended and hurt … so many people”.Dawkins, whose bestselling study of evolution, The Selfish Gene, was named the most influential science book of all time by the Royal Society last week, was lined up to speak about his memoir A Brief Candle in the Dark at an event hosted by Berkeley’s KPFA Radio in August. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:06:59 GMT)

Internet firms should use profits to stamp out child abuse images, says police chief
Mike Barton says companies must do more to stop content appearing online, and questions difficulty of removing imagesInternet companies should reinvest some of their “eye-watering” profits into efforts to stamp out child abuse images online, a chief constable has said.Mike Barton challenged firms to do more to stop the content appearing in the first place, as police arrest hundreds of suspected paedophiles every month. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:57:22 GMT)

UK should increasingly expect record winter rains, says Met Office
Aided by a supercomputer, meteorologists find 34% chance of record monthly rainfall being set, raising fears about major floodingFears have been raised that the UK could soon see a repeat of the sort of flooding that has hit in recent years after forecasters predicted a one-in-three chance there would be a new record set for monthly rainfall during coming winters.The Met Office used a supercomputer to simulate possible extreme weather conditions to help build up a picture of what was likely to befall the UK. Forecasters found a 7% chance of a monthly rainfall record being set in the south-east. This rose to 34% once other regions of England and Wales were taken into account. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:30:34 GMT)

Poland's president to veto controversial laws amid protests
Andrzej Duda says he will block proposed legislation that would have put supreme court under control of ruling partyPoland’s president has said he will veto controversial judicial reforms that have sparked days of nationwide street protests and prompted the EU to threaten unprecedented sanctions.“I have decided to send back to parliament – in which case to veto – the law on the supreme court, as well as the law on the National Council of the Judiciary,” Andrzej Duda said in a televised announcement. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:32:22 GMT)

England women’s rugby union squad contracts will end after World Cup
• RFU have defended their switch in emphasis to the sevens game• Maggie Alphonsi and Labour MPs have expressed dismay at decisionThe England women’s rugby union squad will play in the World Cup in Ireland next month knowing that their contracts will not be renewed whether they successfully defend their title or not.Maggie Alphonsi, who has retired since collecting her World Cup winners’ medal in 2014, has described the news as “very disappointing” and while both she and some MPs have reacted with dismay to the emerging news, the Rugby Football Union (RFU) have defended the switch in emphasis to the sevens game after the tournament. RFU director of professional rugby Nigel Melville said the players were told in the spring. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:09:26 GMT)

Travellers are taking advantage of bag rules to avoid fees, says Ryanair
Airline complains even toddlers are dragging suitcases onboard as passengers bring more and more luggage into cabinCash-strapped holidaymakers are making their toddlers drag suitcases onboard planes to escape baggage fees, according to Ryanair bosses. Fewer passengers than ever are checking bags into the aircraft hold. Instead, travellers are avoiding charges by bringing more and more luggage into the cabin. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:45:03 GMT)

‘If you are old enough to carry a gun, you are old enough to be a soldier’
South Sudan has the largest number of child soldiers in Africa. Most are still fighting, but efforts are being made to disarm and reintegrate them into society David Zelu, not yet 16 years old, looks up, smiles, and stretches his arms to the sky where the sun is finally breaking through the clouds. The rain that has hammered on the wooden roof of the small hut he shares with four other teenagers has passed. Crows wheel overhead, and small thin children jump in puddles. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:16:47 GMT)

When good TV goes bad: how Game of Thrones became a throng of dire old vice
When you tackle said contest, you win or you die – or you churn out scenes of sexual exploitation until you become creatively bankruptGame of Thrones recap: season seven, episode two: StormbornThis time last year, I stupidly put my Game of Thrones beer mug in the dishwasher. When I took it out, the words “Winter is coming” and the show’s logo had disappeared. Only the image of a snarling direwolf remained. It was a sign.Later that day, I read the recap to the denouement of last season’s finale, which posed the following conundrum: “The question now is how much has Sansa learnt – will she decide it’s better to be the lady of Winterfell and the power behind Jon’s throne ... or will she listen to Littlefinger’s attempts to spread discord?” No, I realised, that was not the question. The question was: why I had ever cared about this guff? How had I cared for so long about which claimant would install their derriere on the Iron Throne, be they Ye Lannisters of the Westerlands, Ye Greyjoys of the Iron Islands, or Ye Lentil-Weaving Guardian Readers of Islington North? Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:00:35 GMT)

Michelle Terry is a bold, unexpected and possibly inspired choice for Shakespeare's Globe
The Globe’s new artistic director may have little directing experience. But as an actor, she had a huge range, a fierce intelligence and a profound understanding of Shakespeare’s languageForget all the stuff about poisoned chalices. Running Shakespeare’s Globe is a huge opportunity and Michelle Terry strikes me as a bold, unexpected and possibly inspired choice to be the new artistic director. She may have minimal experience as a director but, as an actor, she has shown herself to have a vibrant presence, a fierce intelligence and a profound understanding of Shakespeare’s language. This last strikes me as the key point. Whatever one’s feelings about Emma Rice’s controversial reign – and there is little doubt that she was not treated well by the board – productions during her tenure have been marked by a cavalier attitude to the verse.Terry, as an experienced actor who has worked at the Globe, the National, the RSC and the Regent’s Park Open Air theatre, understands that any production of Shakespeare has to start from a scrupulous examination of the language. That doesn’t stop directors imaginatively relocating the action. But the current Globe ethos, which seems to regard Shakespeare as a bit boring unless punctuated by pop music, will surely be severely questioned by its new artistic director. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:05:31 GMT)

Pregnancy mythbusting: from ‘eating for two’ to pineapple bringing on labour
The idea that women need to eat a lot of extra food when they are pregnant has endured, but it’s not the only nonsense expectant parents have to put up withThe myth of “eating for two” endures partly because it kind of makes sense, but mainly because it is so appealing. In a survey of 2,100 women, the National Charity Partnership (NCP) found that two-thirds of women did not know how many extra calories they needed during pregnancy (a measly 200 a day – something like, the charity says, two pieces of wholegrain toast with olive-oil spread – and only in the third trimester). Being overweight in pregnancy carries increased risks to the woman and baby; the myth, said the Alex Davis, head of prevention for the NCP, is “very unhelpful”. Other myths are just annoying – and at no other life stage will a woman be subjected to so much rubbish. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:43:23 GMT)

Underfunded and overstretched: the lawyers seeking justice for Grenfell
North Kensington Law Centre was the first in the UK to offer access to justice for the poor and vulnerable. Now fighting for financial survival, the tragedy on its doorstep has meant NKLC’s services are more in demand than everNorth Kensington Law Centre is based in a vast subterranean bunker beneath the Lancaster West housing estate in west London. The doors at the rear of the building are just a few feet from the charred remains of Grenfell Tower.In the early hours of Wednesday 14 June, as the catastrophic fire took hold, the law centre’s director, Victoria Vasey, was woken by text messages from friends and colleagues. “I got here as quickly as possible,” she recalls. “We all came with the same idea of bringing clothes and food, but it was apparent by lunchtime that that was in hand. The people working in the community centres have been phenomenal.” Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:03:47 GMT)

Jordan Spieth’s Open victory has given him an early shot at greatness | Ewan Murray
The young American’s triumph ended the run of maiden major winners and has put an entirely different slant on next month’s US PGA when he can join the game’s legends with a career grand slamGolf has its mojo back. It should hardly be disrespectful to those who had claimed the last seven majors before the Open Championship that Jordan Spieth’s success has a broader appeal. Every sport benefits, after all, from blue-chip players winning blue-chip events.Such a theory will be borne out in a matter of weeks as Spieth attempts to become the youngest player in history to claim all four major titles. Among those entitled to savour spine-tingling events at Royal Birkdale on Sunday was the PGA of America; its US PGA Championship has suddenly been ramped up a notch. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:25:08 GMT)

Women could cycle the Tour de France route, so why give them La Course?
Annemiek Van Vleuten was a worthy winner of the two-day race but women cyclists deserve more than a shortened mountain stage and a novelty pursuit By Suze Clemitson of 100 Tales 100 Tours, part of the Guardian Sport NetworkAnyone who watched Annemiek van Vleuten’s sickening, bone-crunching crash as she was heading for gold in the women’s road race at the Olympics last summer will have been roaring her over the line in the concluding stage of La Course on Saturday. Van Vleuten was a worthy winner, having battled back to fitness after suffering three spinal fractures and a severe concussion in Rio. Her victory means a Dutch rider has won the race in three of the last four years.The previous three editions of La Course took place on the final Sunday of the Tour de France, with a sprint on the Champs-Élysées, but the organisers introduced a new format this year. On Thursday, riders raced a 67km mountain stage from Briançon to the top of the fearsome Col d’Izoard. The top finishers from Thursday qualified for a 22.5km pursuit-style individual time trial in Marseille on Saturday. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:22:54 GMT)

England Women’s World Cup cricket triumph will prove ‘watershed moment’
• Anya Shrubsole says game felt like a milestone occasion for women’s cricket• Worldwide television audience for match was rumoured to be 100 millionAnya Shrubsole believes that England’s dramatic Women’s World Cup triumph will prove to be a “watershed moment” for the sport.Shrubsole was the star of the show at a sold-out Lord’s on Sunday as she tore through India’s lower order to secure a nine-run win. The swing bowler took six for 46, including five in 19 balls, to snatch an extraordinary victory from the jaws of what appeared an inevitable defeat. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:10:56 GMT)

Manchester City sign £52m Benjamin Mendy to take spending over £200m
• Mendy signs five-year contract from Monaco • Transfer fee is world record for a defenderManchester City have announced the signing of Benjamin Mendy from Monaco on a five-year contract for a fee of around £52m (€57.5m). The France international had been identified as a key target by Pep Guardiola following the departure of left-back Gaël Clichy, while Aleksandar Kolarov also left for Roma last week.Mendy came through Le Havre’s youth system before a move to Marseille in 2013. The 23-year-old switched to Monaco last summer for £11m where he established himself as one of the best full-backs in world football with his powerful and direct style of play, during a season in which the club claimed the French title and reached the semi-finals of the Champions League. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:38:08 GMT)

Chris Froome: ‘I’d like to be here for the next five years, trying to win’
• British rider wants to race into his late thirties after fourth Tour de France win• Froome is now one title away from equalling record number of Tour victoriesChris Froome, with his fourth Tour de France in the bag thanks to one of the strongest final weeks he can remember putting in, is now likely to move on to the Tour of Spain, depending on his form. Related: Tour de France 2017: final stage – as it happened Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 21:30:18 GMT)

Eilidh Doyle will captain Great Britain athletics team at World Championships
• The 400 metres hurdler was voted into role by fellow team members• The championships get under way at London Stadium on August 4Eilidh Doyle will captain the Great Britain athletics team at next month’s World Championships in London. The 400 metres hurdler was voted into the role by her fellow team members.She said: “I’m absolutely chuffed to bits. It’s a huge honour to have been elected by my peers as the team captain for British Athletics at London 2017. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:36:36 GMT)

Premier League at 25: the best player – Eric Cantona | Paul Doyle
In the first of a five-part series we pick the division’s finest player. Cantona was the enigma who exploded the doubt at Manchester United, his arrival sparking a first title win for 26 years and a sustained run of success under Sir Alex FergusonWe can’t be putting Tina Turner on for just any old hero, nor merely for the most skilful. And the toughest, longest-lasting or most prolific can go whistle because only one player can be serenaded as simply the best and it must be the one who has done more than any other to shape the Premier League years. Show us another player who has radiated as much influence as Eric Cantona and we will show you a figment of your imagination.The rebranding of English football’s First Division as the Premier League coincided with the dawn of Manchester United’s imperial age. Before that they had been champions seven times in 89 years; since then they have won 13 of 25 available titles. There is a fair chance that followers of Manchester’s red team would be (much less numerous and) still harking back to the black-and-white era if it were not for Cantona, the enigma who exploded doubt. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:08:26 GMT)

World Paras could return in 2019 to a London that has embraced event | Jacob Steinberg
Strong ticket sales and support mean that the IPC and athletes would welcome another bid from the capital for the World Para Athletics ChampionshipsBritain’s reputation as a strong supporter of Para sport means that London would have an excellent chance of hosting the World Para Athletics Championships again in 2019 should it decide to enter the bidding process.London 2017 marked the first time in the event’s 23-year history that it was held in the same city and summer as its IAAF equivalent, which represented major progress for the Paralympic movement, and the International Paralympic Committee’s preference would be for that to continue. However, the world athletics championships is heading to Doha in 2019 and the IPC will not consider a return to a city where only 15,000 tickets were sold two years ago. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:00:32 GMT)

Wakefield scheme for new 10,000-seater stadium backed by parliament
• Club hope to become anchor tenants at ground in nearby Newmarket• Planning approval initially granted in 2012 but project has been stalledWakefield Trinity have received parliamentary support in their battle for a new stadium in the city as the deadline for them to inform the Rugby Football League of their plans for next season and beyond approaches.Trinity are hoping to become anchor tenants in a proposed 10,000 all-seater stadium in nearby Newmarket, which was initially given planning approval in 2012 but has since been stalled by a number of delays. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:00:34 GMT)

If Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City are to succeed, Ederson needs to hit ground running
City suffered for the wrong choice of goalkeeper last season and Guardiola’s hopes will be compromised if Claudio Bravo’s inexperienced replacement does not prove worth the £34.7m outlayThe success of Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City tenure could hinge on a 23-year-old goalkeeper who is untested in English football and has only one full season behind him at a major Portuguese club.Ederson Santana de Moraes was bought for £34.7m from Benfica this summer. The size of a fee close to the world record for his position indicates two things: how good the Brazilian is believed to be; and how keenly Guardiola wishes to remedy his problem at No1. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:00:34 GMT)

Chelsea’s Pedro suffered multiple fractures in collision with David Ospina
• Spain forward to wear mask when he returns to training in 10 days• Álvaro Morata to make Chelsea debut against Bayern on TuesdayAntonio Conte has revealed the injury suffered by Pedro in Chelsea’s pre-season friendly victory over Arsenal is more serious than he thought.The 29-year-old was taken off in the first half of the 3-0 win in Beijing after a heavy collision with goalkeeper David Ospina, with the club later announcing that he stayed the night in hospital having sustained a concussion and facial injuries. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:33:09 GMT)

Jodie Taylor strike ensures England weather Spain possession at Euro 2017
• England 2-0 Spain (Kirby 2, Taylor 85)• Scotland 1-2 Portugal (Cuthbert 67; Mendes 28, Leita 72)The weather was extreme, the refereeing controversial and much of Spain’s passing exceptional but, not for the first time, Mark Sampson’s England found a way to win in adversity. Fran Kirby’s high-calibre early finish and another outstanding late goal from Jodie Taylor left them top of Group D and on the verge of qualification for the knockout phase.Along with torrential rain the Lionesses were forced to weather quite a technical storm from a gifted Spain side who ranked as one of the pre-tournament favourites. But, despite ceding the bulk of possession, Sampson’s defence restricted their opponents to half-chances. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 18:25:10 GMT)

Michael Phelps races a great white shark (sort of) – video
Olympic great Michael Phelps races a ‘great white shark’ on Sunday as part of Shark Week on the Discovery Channel. The shark was in-fact a computer simulation rather than a actual great white but its swim speed was calculated using data collected from the real thing. Phelps finished the 100m course in 38 seconds, two second slower than the ‘shark’Watch more clips on our amazing world of sport page Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:57:55 GMT)

Tour de France 2017: how the race unfolded – video
The 2017 Tour de France will live long in the memory after featuring numerous moments of high drama. From Peter Sagan’s controversial disqualification and Richie Porte’s crash during stage nine to Warren Barguil winning on the Izoard and Chris Froome collecting his fourth yellow jersey. Here, watch how the 2017 Tour unfoldedFroome wins fourth Tour after Champs Élysées procession Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:46:39 GMT)

Talking Horses: best Monday bets at Windsor, Beverley, Ayr and Cartmel
Stormy Blues has the form to rise to the occasion at Windsor (8.15) while Regulator is the pick at Ayr (1.55)No one can complain about the quantity of runners at Monday’s four meetings, and at the two evening fixtures at Beverley and Windsor in particular, where the field sizes average above 12 and 10 respectively. Quality, as would be expected on a Monday, is spread a little more thinly. But on pedigree at least there are several interesting runners in the 10-furlong maiden at Windsor, including Stormy Blues (8.15), a half-brother to this year’s Ascot Gold Cup winner, Big Orange.Stormy Blues is one of three runners for the Godolphin operation in the 16-strong field, along with Adjacent, a half-brother to three winners, and Clearly, a half-sister to three winners whose dam was a half-sister to the Lammtarra, the Derby and Arc winner in 1995. Other runners with interesting pedigrees include Fujaira Prince, a half-brother to Willie Mullins’s top-class hurdler Nichols Canyon, who won at listed level on the Flat, and Graphite, a gelded son of Galileo, whose dam, Simply Perfect, was a dual Group 1 winner in the Fillies’ Mile and Falmouth Stakes. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:08:14 GMT)

‘His head isn’t right’: Antonio Cassano leaves Verona but vows to play on
• Former Italy striker looking for new club after leaving Serie A side• ‘There’s an up and a down with him, he talks and then he’s silent’Antonio Cassano’s shortlived spell at Verona is at an end after the Italian club’s president confirmed the veteran striker has left the club because “his head isn’t right”.Cassano, who won 39 caps for Italy, joined Verona on 10 July but decided to retire from football a week later, before being persuaded to perform a dramatic U-turn within hours of announcing his decision. Less than seven days later, however, the 35-year-old has now decided to go through with his threat to leave the Serie A club. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:45:18 GMT)

County cricket talking points: Ross Whiteley hits six sixes ... and loses
Ross Whiteley scored 37 in one over for Worcestershire but David Willey’s 118 helped Yorkshire win the match and climb to the top of their T20 Blast groupBy Gary Naylor for the 99.94 Cricket Blog, part of the Guardian Sport NetworkKevin Pietersen’s Surrey (see what I did there) top the South Group after a couple of strange matches at The Oval. On Wednesday, a raucous (but not too raucous) capacity crowd saw him almost single-handedly get Surrey up to 150, a score that proved good enough on a slow pitch exploited with Yorkshire nous by Gareth Batty, whose four overs brought him 2-19. But back to Pietersen, as always seems to be the case. Having been badly dropped at cow corner by Dan Lawrence and “running” like a stiff Alastair Cook, he appeared to decide to hit sixes and five of the match’s eight flew off his bat. In more ways than one, he played like a right-handed version of Chris Gayle – whether that is a good look these days remains to be seen. It worked in this match, no other batsman crossing 30, as Essex fell 11 short of their target. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:23:03 GMT)

John Gosden will decide in midweek if Enable runs in the King George
• Top-class filly was left in the midsummer highlight on Monday• Clarehaven handler will make final decision on WednesdayJohn Gosden sounds positive about the likelihood of dual Oaks winner Enable running in the King George VI And Queen Elizabeth Stakes at Ascot on Saturday.The top-class filly has been left in the midsummer highlight at the five-day declaration stage, with the Clarehaven handler due to make a final decision on Wednesday after he speaks to owner Khalid Abdullah. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:03:54 GMT)

Castleford in Super League driving seat before start of Super 8s
• Daryl Powell’s side assured of place in play-offs with 10-point lead• Salford take fourth place after Wakefield’s 41-16 defeat by St HelensThe final day of the Super League regular season sprung a late shock when Salford sneaked into fourth place despite winning only one of their last seven games. A heavy home defeat by St Helens sent Wakefield out of the top four and opened the door to the Red Devils.There have been surprising results throughout Super League’s 20th season and, after a roller-coaster 23 rounds, nobody is sure what the Super 8s will deliver in these final seven weeks. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 18:18:58 GMT)

My father and press freedom are on trial in Turkey – don’t look away, Europe | Muratcan Sabuncu
The trial of 12 imprisoned Cumhuriyet newspaper journalists is a warning that democracy and human rights are fragile everywhere• Muratcan Sabuncu is the son of editor-in-chief Murat Sabuncu and president of Sorbonne Human Rights AssociationWe all know the story of the small child who piped up “the emperor has no clothes” while everybody was pretending to admire the despot parading through the streets. This child is analogous to those who, in the same spirit of honesty, have come out to tell the truth in today’s Turkey. The truth-tellers are in fact the real patriots, and they succeeded in becoming the conscience of a country by dispelling the fog clouding our perceptions to show us reality.My father, Murat Sabuncu, is a truth-teller. He is the editor-in-chief of Cumhuriyet daily newspaper, which is one of the very few remaining critical but respected voices in the Turkish media. He and 11 of his colleagues from Cumhuriyet have been detained for the past nine months. Their trial will start in Istanbul on Monday. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:00:31 GMT)

Why are Grenfell victims pleading for humanity? This council should resign | Seraphima Kennedy
As underlined by the public meeting with survivors, the council’s problems with those who rely on local services did not start with the fire• Seraphima Kennedy is a former neighbourhood officer at Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management OrganisationIf you were at the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea’s first public meeting since the fire at Grenfell last week, you would have heard the testimony of Sandra Ruiz. “I’m not a survivor,” she said, “I’m speaking on behalf of my niece – 12-year-old Jessica Urbano, who is no longer with us.” Sandra wrote to the incoming council leader at the beginning of the month, asking for “humility and humanity … that you go out and meet the families”. As of Wednesday, she had neither met the council leader nor received a response. “As the member of a family of someone who has deceased,” she said, “a simple acknowledgment to an email would have gone a long way.”You would have heard the story of Mahboubeh Jamalvatan from 10 Grenfell Tower. “They say they understand you,” she said, gesturing to officials, “but the truth of the matter is that they don’t.” Holding up her now useless house key, she asked: “Every time I look at this, I wonder, what’s the difference between us human beings? What does humanity mean?” Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:30:03 GMT)

Stop drones spoiling our wilderness
The government is putting safety and privacy measures in place for flying drones in the UK, but it’s doing nothing to protect the solitude of our wild spacesEarlier this month, beneath a blazing sun and a clear blue sky, I smeared on the factor 30 and headed up Sgurr Alasdair with my pals. The tallest mountain on the Isle of Skye, weighing in at 3,255ft (992 metres), it was one of the most thrilling climbs we’ve ever done. The views – of the island, the sea and the mountains stretching across the mainland beyond – were stunning.But there was one niggle. Just as we reached the halfway point, near the beautiful clear waters of the loch at Coire Lagan, I heard a noise like a dentist’s drill. It got louder and louder until I saw its cause: a drone. It whizzed round the boulders, sped over the loch, then hovered in close to film me, like the world’s most annoying midge, the high-pitched whine of its four rotors ripping right through the spell this place, ringed by mighty cliffs, casts on climbers. I looked around for a rock to chuck. But then it occurred to me that, despite being halfway up one of Britain’s finest peaks, I was effectively on CCTV. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:09:09 GMT)

Humans are losing touch with nature – it’s a tragedy with no quick fix | Deborah Orr
British alienation with the countryside points towards the same problem as the rise in alcoholism and gambling addiction: we’ve lost our place in the world• Deborah Orr is a Guardian columnistResearch published on Monday suggests that British people are becoming increasingly detached from wildlife, the countryside and nature. Seven out of 10 people in the Jordans Cereals survey admitted they felt they were losing touch with the natural world, while a third said they did not know enough about the subject to teach their own children. One in three people could not identify an oak tree.This detachment has negative consequences for conservation. People simply can’t and won’t rally round to save something they are not really aware of. A major report last year already warned that Britain is among “the most nature-depleted countries in the world”. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:04:07 GMT)

Why not fund the welfare state with a 100% inheritance tax? | Abi Wilkinson
The idea that we should be able to pass on our life’s accumulated wealth is deeply embedded. But imagine if we could use that money for the greater good• Abi Wilkinson is a freelance journalistLike most of the British public, I disliked the Conservatives’ “dementia tax” proposal during the election campaign. When you make someone’s access to social care dependent on giving up the money they intend to pass on to descendants, you risk encouraging them to struggle on without seeking the help they need. While you’d hope most people would prioritise the wellbeing of elderly family members over cold hard cash, it seems inevitable that some might delay organising support for relatives to avoid depleting their future wealth. Related: Inheritance tax is toxic. We need new ways to tackle inequality | Polly Toynbee Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:59:29 GMT)

Beaten, urinated on … for homeless people, abuse is a daily ordeal | Tamsen Courtenay
A London coffee shop caused outrage when it refused to sell food to a good samaritan for a homeless man. But I saw far worse during my time on the streets• Tamsen Courtenay is an authorLike many other people, I watched Adrian Pinsent’s video of coffee shop staff at Waterloo station last week refusing to let him buy food for a man with no home and an empty stomach. A member of staff claimed that it was company policy and the rules of the station. The employee was wrong, it turned out – but the incident brought back some vivid memories for me.I recently spent several months in central London recording 30 homeless people as they chronicled their lives with great candour and humility. Much of what they talked about was their life, now, on the street. No front door key. Few possessions. Little dignity. I collected their stories and called the book Four Feet Under, because they live four feet under the rest of us. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:30:34 GMT)

BBC is paying too much for talent it can afford to lose
The BBC is a ‘selling club’, in football parlance. Its role is not to dominate viewing figuresThere was a point during last week’s ritual savaging of BBC executives that one began to feel sorry for James Purnell. The former Labour minister who joined the BBC as head of digital and strategy in 2013 trailed around the studios of New Broadcasting House being gleefully mauled by journalists who are mercifully good at their jobs. Executive and star pay at the BBC is a subject loved by news producers, sadistically pitting the hated boss class and the vain talent against each other in an awkward series of explanations.In his new role as head of radio and education, Purnell might have felt a strong impulse to clip the salary of Jeremy Vine who, in the most BBC of all BBC moments asked Purnell on his Radio 2 show: “How can you justify my salary?” Given that it is more than £700,000 a year, the honest answer would be “I can’t”, but Purnell opted for the lamer: “You’re fantastic.” Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:00:29 GMT)

The UK ignores China's trillion-dollar Belt and Road plan at its peril | Colin Cram
Post-Brexit, the UK will need to look east. So why does its transport investment strategy ignore the world’s greatest infrastructure programme?The UK risks being marginalised after Brexit if it does not revitalise its infrastructure to engage with the huge markets developing in central Asia. But the UK government’s recent transport investment strategy virtually ignores the greatest infrastructure programme the world has ever seen. Related: Reject the chancers and their fantasy visions of post-Brexit trade | Martin Kettle Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:23:29 GMT)

Thirsty city: after months of water rationing Nairobi may run dry
The rains have been poor while demand for water grows along with the city - there are solutions but they will mean radical actionFor the team managing Nairobi’s water, the stakes have never been so high. Water-rationing has been going on in Kenya’s capital has since 1 January, and supplies might run dry by September. The last two rainy seasons were dismal; more rain is not expected until October and cannot be counted on. For the city’s 3.4 million residents, the possibility of the entire city running dry is so beyond their control that most bat the thought away and soldier on, storing water in jerry cans when taps flow. But the problem is getting harder to ignore. On 14 July, Nairobi City County declared a cholera outbreak, citing among causes “irregular supply of potable water”. How bad might this get? Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:00:37 GMT)

Should the Americanisation (or Americanization) of English worry us? | Rebecca Rideal
From the first settlers to the New World, English speakers have absorbed myriad influences – modern anxieties about ‘corruption’ say a lot about our times• Rebecca Rideal is a historian and author“That’s what this nation has been built on, proud men. Proud fucking warriors!” shouts Combo in one of the most well-known scenes from This Is England. What Combo would have thought of the recent report that the language of his beloved nation was becoming increasingly Americanised we can only imagine. But very few things have engendered as much debate as the language we speak – from Jonathan Swift’s concerns in 1712 that English would fall from use like Latin, and Samuel Johnson’s attempt in the mid-18th century to “preserve the purity” of the English language, to fresh claims that the “state of innocence” in which British English once existed has been “corrupted” by Americanisms. Perhaps we need to ask two questions: 1) What do modern anxieties about the English language say about us? 2) What does it mean to be English today?The linguist David Crystal has argued that any pride taken in a native language may be “tinged with concern when you realise that other countries may not want to use the language in the same way”. The truth is, the English language is not fixed and has undergone myriad changes over the centuries; absorbing words, phrases and spellings from all over the globe. Numerous dialects and regional peculiarities mean a linear view of its history is imperfect. Nevertheless, roughly speaking, there have been four key linguistic shifts: old English from the 5th century (Beowulf); Norman-influenced middle English from the 11th century (Chaucer); early modern English from the 15th century (King James bible/Shakespeare); and the emergence of modern English towards the end of the 17th century. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:00:32 GMT)

Democratic donors still think they can anoint rising stars in the Hamptons | Ross Barkan
What’s strange about living in the year 1 AT (After Trump) is how Democrats disregard the phenomenon in their wake. But business as usual won’t doKamala Harris, the California senator and new darling of the left, did what all liberal darlings do when their stars begin to burn bright: she went east, way east, to the Hamptons. In the old world, before a democratic socialist and a reality show nativist upended politics as we know it, the narrative would write itself. A little-known possible presidential candidate with a compelling backstory and a buzzy turn in the spotlight visits the millionaire and billionaire donors who decide who can run and who can’t. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:00:33 GMT)

Steve Bell’s If ... Vince Cable, the elephant man in the room
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(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 05:10:27 GMT)

Labour can win. But first it must explain what Corbynism means | Jeremy Gilbert
There are now two competing interpretations – a grassroots movement and a centralised philosophy• Jeremy Gilbert is professor of cultural and political theory at the University of East LondonThe claim that Tony Blair discouraged Labour members in Jeremy Corbyn’s constituency from trying to deselect their MP is made for a reason. Blairites in parliament are fearful that new rules may make them more accountable to local members. The implication is that Corbyn should follow Blair’s example, in his warm embrace of internal party pluralism and his suppression of local deselection efforts. Related: Revealed: Jeremy Corbyn’s secret backer when chips were down – Tony Blair Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:00:29 GMT)

This is not 'natural selection': east Africa is in the grip of a famine emergency | Phoebe Williams
The callous response to the famine in east Africa shows that our luxurious lifestyles in Australia have stopped us from exercising empathyPhoebe Williams is a paediatric doctor at Sydney Children’s hospital, currently working in rural Kenya Earlier this month Adam Gartrell’s article flashed up on my phone screen as I walked between hospital wards in which critically unwell children are congested three-to-a-bed in rural Kenya. The title (“Ignorant and ugly: Australian social media attitudes to an African disaster”) stopped me in my tracks – a combination of surprise that the devastation I am bearing witness to each day was reaching our isolated nation’s news cycle, and utter sorrow to see it had conjured such abhorrent comments on social media. It painted our nation as one in which our citizens are devoid of empathy, or ubuntu. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 05:36:38 GMT)

The UK peddles a cynical colonialism and calls it aid | Zoe Williams
We applaud ourselves for spending 0.7% of GDP on aid, but this is just self-interest dressed up as benevolence• Zoe Williams is a Guardian columnistMost of the Conservative 2017 manifesto read like a sloppily constructed plot point in a tale of hubris. All platitudes, jingoism and bear traps, it was it was like the document you produce when you think you can’t lose, just before you do. Yet on the matter of international aid, it was precise: we were to maintain the commitment to spend 0.7% of GDP on aid, a target finally reached in 2013 and enshrined in law two years later. But we would, in the Conservative plan, “work with like-minded countries to change the rules”. And if that didn’t work, we would “change the law to allow us to use a better definition of development spending”.In the context of the aid debate – which has been coarsened right down to: should we spend any money on foreigners, when we have problems of our own? – this seemed pretty innocuous. Money is money: what does it care about definitions? It has its own physical laws, and when you spend it, people benefit. More delicate questions of narrative and framing matter even less. So what if we stop talking about “aid” and start talking about “investment”? Doesn’t that just forge a more equal relationship between source nation and recipient? Why not talk about mutual benefit, about how our aid to others makes our own nation safer and more prosperous? If the secretary of state for international development, Priti Patel, has made it explicit that she wants to use the aid budget to “tear down the barriers to free trade”, isn’t that better than such an aim being implicit? Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 15:02:42 GMT)

We need robots to have morals. Could Shakespeare and Austen help? | John Mullan
Using great literature to teach ethics to machines is a dangerous game. The classics are a moral minefield• John Mullan is professor of English literature at University College LondonWhen he wrote the stories in I, Robot in the 1940s, Isaac Asimov imagined a world in which robots do all humanity’s tedious or unpleasant jobs for them, but where their powers have to be restrained. They are programmed to obey three laws. A robot may not injure another human being, even through inaction; a robot must obey a human being (except to contradict the previous law); a robot must protect itself (unless this contradicts either of the previous laws). Unfortunately, scientists soon create a robot (Herbie) that understands the concept of “mental injury”. Like a character in a Thomas Hardy novel or an Ibsen play, the robot soon finds itself in a situation where truthfully answering a question put to it by the humans it serves will cause hurt – but so will not answering the question. A logical impasse. The robot screams piercingly and collapses into “a huddled heap of motionless metal”. Related: Do no harm, don't discriminate: official guidance issued on robot ethics Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 05:00:27 GMT)

It’s not just the BBC that must come clean about underpaying women | Sophie Walker
The Women’s Equality party is calling on other broadcasters to publish the salaries of their top earners, along with a gender pay gap action plan• Sophie Walker is the leader of the Women’s Equality partyWhen the BBC published the salaries of its top earners, the results were not surprising, but they were shocking. They even managed, momentarily, to silence the gender pay gap myth-busters: the trolls who daily patrol social media challenging any mention of a pay gap with supposedly hard facts about the “choices” women make.Silence fell – briefly – as everyone realised that this pay gap didn’t care about the privilege of its victims. The few female top earners were generally white, middle class and non-disabled. As horrifying and unjustifiable as the pay discrepancies are, the women who made the list earn considerable amounts of money. The BBC has also taken steps to improve its diversity. Its staff and programming still do not perfectly reflect the wider population, but compared with some other media organisations, it is making progress. So what hope do the rest of us have if the pay gap is this wide, regardless of the seniority of the staff or good intentions of the organisation? Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 17:08:37 GMT)

Nicola Jennings on the presenter pay gap – cartoon
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(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 18:35:46 GMT)

The Guardian view on Brexit and farming: outlook unsettled | Editorial
In his first speech last week, the new Defra secretary Michael Gove called Brexit ‘the unfrozen moment’. But that may not mean the sunlit uplands lie ahead for agricultureThe “unfrozen moment” Michael Gove, the new Defra secretary, called the impact of Brexit on agriculture and the environment in his first speech last week. It’s a deft description of the potential for transformation that leaving the EU offers, which is undoubtedly what Mr Gove intended. But it also conveys foreboding. That would be right too. Redesigning what is by far the most important relationship for the UK’s food and agriculture industry is full of risk – to the price the consumer pays for their food, to the familiar landscape of Britain, and to the complex network of relationships that sustains the rural economy.The Brexit campaign was as light on the detail of what leaving the EU would mean for food and farming as it was for everything else – except for the claim that it would mean cheap food. Stripped of the costly common agriculture policy, the argument went, and able to import from around the world, the price of food in the shops would plummet. That remains an option. But it would come at a heavy cost. It would spell disaster for the farmers who compromise a little on productivity in order to nurture the environment; if, for example, it meant importing meat from the US, it would probably wreck Britain’s long improvement in farm animal welfare; and if it meant importing GM foods, it would almost certainly end the chance of a trade deal with Europe. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 17:34:39 GMT)

Celebrate Lady Hale – then make the senior judiciary more diverse | Erika Rackley
Brenda Hale’s appointment as president of the UK supreme court is a landmark. But the highest echelons of the legal profession still need changeErika Rackley is professor of law at Birmingham UniversityOccurring just two years shy of the centenary of women entering the legal profession, Lady Hale’s appointment as president of the UK supreme court is a landmark for women lawyers and judges and for women in public life more generally. Another first ticked off a list that remains disappointingly long. Related: 'Women are equal to everything': Lady Hale lives up to her motto Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 14:48:41 GMT)

While Hammond looks for a magic money tree, Labour has found one | Larry Elliott
If the chancellor is to fund higher spending without increasing borrowing, he will need revenue – step forward, Prof Avinash PersaudFor Spreadsheet Phil, the numbers look bad. Growth is weakening. Higher inflation means debt interest payments are rising. The recent election showed a nation heartily sick of austerity. There are pressures for higher public-sector pay.The one big initiative announced by Philip Hammond in his year or so as chancellor was to move the annual budget from the spring to the autumn. Preparatory work for the first of those will begin in earnest over the summer, and nothing so far has suggested that Hammond will be in a generous mood. Quite the contrary, in fact. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 12:35:11 GMT)

Female channel bosses have earned top billing
Amid the controversy and pay gaps exposed by the BBC’s salary disclosures, two highly skilled and talented women have risen to the top of the broadcasting industryHere, in the midst of current controversy, is some good news. The new leaders of both ITV and Channel 4 are both women (replacing men). More good news sees them not only succeeding on equal terms, but winning the same heady blend of salaries and add-ons. At which point, however, we encounter a few shades of grey.Carolyn McCall, flying in from an easyJet hangar in Luton, is reportedly on course to make £25.2m over the next five years at ITV, if all goes well (an edifice built on the foundations of £900,000 pa). Her predecessor, Adam Crozier, has earned £24.9m since 2012. Alex Mahon, replacing David Abraham atop C4, can expect to hit his £881,000 a year, perhaps edging closer to a million if the ad revenue rolls in (as it did at the end of Abraham’s reign). Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 06:00:00 GMT)

Parents of girl who died after reported psychoactive drug use warn teenagers
‘Make safer choices,’ say parents of Leah Kerry, 15, calling for government to put psychoactive substances at top of agendaThe parents of a 15-year-old girl who died after reportedly taking a new psychoactive substance have urged other teenagers to “make better and safer choices”.Leah Kerry was found unconscious in Bakers Park in Newton Abbot, Devon, after apparently taking a new psychoactive substance (NPS), formerly known as a legal high. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:40:49 GMT)

Brexit economy: sterling fall hits public finances and fails to boost trade
The latest monthly Guardian analysis uncovers signs amid the ongoing slowdown that the impact of the pound’s depreciation is starting to fadeThe sharp fall in sterling triggered by the EU referendum result is having an adverse effect on Britain’s already weak public finances but has yet to bring about the expected improvement in the trade deficit, a Guardian analysis of the economic news of the past month shows.In a period in which business confidence took a hit from the government’s loss of its overall majority in the general election, the Guardian’s monthly tracker found little evidence that the impact of a more competitive currency was offsetting a slowdown in consumer spending caused by dearer imports. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 05:00:27 GMT)

Two boys jailed for life for murdering teenager with 'Rambo-style knife'
Gang members then aged 14 injured a second youth in eight-minute rampage while minicab waited in Harrow, LondonTwo 15-year-old gang members who murdered an innocent teenager with a “Rambo-style knife” have been given life sentences.The boys were both aged 14 when they took a minicab to the Harrow area of west London, seeking retribution against rival gang members for an attack on one of their own. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:08:26 GMT)

Actor Michelle Terry to replace Emma Rice at Shakespeare's Globe
Experienced stage actor to take over as artistic director from Rice, who stepped down citing lack of respect from boardThe actor Michelle Terry is to be the new artistic director of Shakespeare’s Globe, replacing Emma Rice, who was controversially ousted from the theatre.Terry is a respected stage actor who has regularly performed at the Globe and with the Royal Shakespeare Company. However, it is something of a surprise appointment in that Terry has never directed a stage play. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:57:48 GMT)

William speaks of regret as photos from Princess Diana's collection published
Nearly 20 years on from their mother’s death, William and Harry have spoken about their grief and childhood memoriesDressed as policemen, with toy helmets and walkie-talkies, or onboard the royal yacht, Britannia, these photographs of Prince William and Prince Harry are from the personal album belonging to their mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, published for the first time to mark a documentary on her life to be broadcast on Monday.The now Duke of Cambridge and Harry have opened up publicly to speak candidly about their grief, their loss, and coping without their mother, who died after a car crash in Paris on 31 August 1997. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 23:01:20 GMT)

Don't make it easier to change gender, urge conservative activists
Grassroots Conservatives spokeswoman backs view that gender dysphoria is a mental illness People who want to change their gender are suffering from a mental illness and encouraging them to do so is akin to affirming the belief of someone suffering from anorexia that they are fat, a conservative campaign group has claimed.A spokesperson for Grassroots Conservatives, which is independent of the party but primarily draws its membership from its supporters, said activists were concerned about the government’s plans to streamline the process of changing gender. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:36:54 GMT)

Heavy drinking will kill 63,000 people over next five years, doctors warn
Doctors urge government to introduce minimum unit pricing for alcohol as research reveals extent of liver diseaseShare your experiences of accessing help for alcohol misuse Almost 63,000 people in England will die over the next five years from liver problems linked to heavy drinking unless ministers tackle the scourge of cheap alcohol, doctors are warning.Senior members of the medical profession and health charities are urging the government to bring in minimum unit pricing of alcohol and a crackdown on drink advertising to avert what they claim is the “public health crisis” of liver disease deaths. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 23:01:20 GMT)

Two men in court over woman's murder in south-west London
33-year-old charged with murder, rape and kidnap and is also accused of attack on second victim while a 28-year-old faces two charges of kidnapTwo men have appeared in court in connection with the murder of a young woman in London. A 33-year-old man is charged with the murder, rape and kidnap of the woman. He is also accused of the rape, attempted murder and kidnap of a second female victim. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:34:09 GMT)

Household batteries will be key to UK's new energy strategy
UK to pioneer energy innovation through batteries in homes as energy department announces £246m research fundingThe UK will become one of the best places in the world for energy innovation through a shakeup of industry rules paving the way for batteries in people’s homes and across power grids, ministers have pledged.Greg Clark, the business secretary, said a more flexible national electricity grid was key to going beyond the quarter of power that is supplied today by renewable sources, and keeping consumer energy bills down by avoiding the need to pay for costly energy network upgrades. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:16:43 GMT)

Shrinking sweets? 'You're not imagining it,' ONS tells shoppers
Detailed analysis of ‘shrinkflation’ confirms some of the UK’s favourite treats really are getting smaller For all those shoppers who feel chocolate bars, cartons of drink, toilet rolls and countless other products have been getting smaller, now comes official confirmation. A grand total of 2,529 products tracked by the Office for National Statistics have decreased in size over the past five years. Only 614 have got bigger.In an analysis of the phenomenon known as “shrinkflation”, the ONS explores whether these dwindling portions are making life more expensive. The theory goes: if a chocolate bar gets smaller but the price stays the same, that is a form of inflation because you are paying more per bite. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 11:30:41 GMT)

Ben Needham: blood found on toy car and sandal
Police say discovery ‘corroborates and strengthens’ theory that boy died in accident 26 years ago on Greek island of KosSigns of blood have been found on a toy car and sandal believed to have belonged to toddler Ben Needham, who disappeared on Kos 26 years ago. South Yorkshire police said the development “corroborates and strengthens” the theory Ben died in an accident at his grandparents’ farmhouse where he had been staying. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 07:45:39 GMT)

Emissions scandal: VW showing 'utter contempt' for Londoners, says Khan
London mayor accuses Volkswagen of making the UK a laughing stock over refusal to pay £2.5m in compensation while it’s paid billions to US customersSadiq Khan has accused Volkswagen of showing “utter contempt” for Londoners after it refused to pay £2.5m compensation for its role in the dieselgate scandal. The German car manufacturer has paid billions of dollars compensation in the US after admitting around 11m cars worldwide were fitted with “defeat devices” that switched the engine to a cleaner mode to improve results in tests. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:44:35 GMT)

Manchester police hunt for lorry driver who drove at pedestrians
Greater Manchester police said a man was struck in ‘targeted attack’ in city centre on Sunday but said it was not terror-relatedPolice are hunting for a lorry driver who drove at pedestrians in Manchester city centre.Greater Manchester police said a man was struck in the “targeted attack” on Sunday evening but said it was not terror-related. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:27:53 GMT)

State pension changes will cost 7 million people £10,000 each
Analysis shows each person affected may lose £9,800 after government announces raising pension age earlier than plannedMore than 7 million people will lose just under £10,000 each because of new government plans to increase the state pension age earlier than planned. Last week the government announced it would raise the state pension age to 68 for those now in their late 30s and early 40s. The change will affect Britons born between 1970 and 1978, who will now have to wait another year to receive their state pensions, a move which the government found would save £74bn. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 23:01:20 GMT)

Business secretary to announce investment in battery technology
Greg Clark to flesh out industrial strategy by setting out plans to increase productivity, including research projects A £246m investment in developing battery technology in Britain is to be launched by the government as part of its drive towards what it says is a modern industrial strategy. The business and energy secretary, Greg Clark, will announce the funding, including a £45m competition to make batteries more accessible and affordable, in a speech on Monday that should spell out further the government’s plans to increase productivity and growth. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 23:01:20 GMT)

Charlie Gard's parents condemn abuse levelled at hospital staff
Couple say they have also faced backlash over legal case, after hospital reveals staff and patients have been threatenedThe parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard have condemned the abuse and death threats levelled at doctors and hospital staff where he is being treated, but said they have also faced an online backlash.Connie Yates and Chris Gard, who have been involved in a lengthy legal battle over their son’s treatment, said they have faced online abuse after Great Ormond Street hospital (Gosh) revealed the extent of the threats its staff and patients had faced on Saturday. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 18:01:09 GMT)

Ryanair profits take off but airline reissues Brexit warning
Cost controls and rise in passenger numbers hikes profit to £11.40 per flyer but airline remains cautious over post-Brexit fallout and end to open-skies dealRyanair made £11.40 profit from every passenger it carried in the three months to June – up more than £3 a head on the same time a year ago.However the airline remained cautious, issuing another warning about the disruption that could be caused by Brexit to UK flights in 2019. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:35:35 GMT)

Avoid Waterloo, passengers warned after signal failure
Fault fixed but commuters told to avoid country’s busiest station amid disruption across entire South West Trains networkPassengers are being advised not to travel to the country’s busiest railway station – Waterloo – because of a signal failure. South West Trains warned that services across the whole of its network, including to and from London Waterloo, may be cancelled, delayed by up to 90 minutes or revised, although it has now been able to resume running trains. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 07:32:34 GMT)

Price gap between best and worst energy tariffs widens to £109 on average
Difference between big six energy companies’ fixed price deals and standard variable tariffs widens by more than halfThe gap between the best and worst energy tariffs offered by the big six suppliers has widened by more than half since a round of price hikes over the winter.The difference between the firms’ cheapest fixed deals and their most expensive ones, standard variable tariffs, jumped from £70 last November on average to £109 in June, according to challenger supplier Bulb. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:34:52 GMT)

BBC must 'look very hard at itself' over pay gap, says Jeremy Corbyn
Labour leader describes ‘appalling’ gender pay gap as 40 female presenters demand immediate action at BBCThe Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, says the BBC needs to “look very hard at itself” over the gender pay gap, describing the gulf between men’s and women’s pay as appalling.Household names including Newsnight presenters Emily Maitlis and Kirsty Wark, presenters Clare Balding and Angela Rippon and One Show host Alex Jones are among more than 40 women who have written to the director general, Tony Hall, to demand the BBC act to correct the pay gap. It was coordinated by Woman’s Hour host Jane Garvey. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 13:48:29 GMT)

UK approved £283m of arms sales to Saudis after airstrike on Yemen funeral
Campaigners say Britain should have halted weapons exports after attack that caused international outrageThe British government approved £283m of arms sales to Saudi Arabia in the six months after a Saudi airstrike on a funeral that killed scores of people and was criticised by the UN, figures reveal.The airstrike, on 8 October 2016, hit a funeral hall in the Yemeni capital, Sana’a, killing 140 people and injuring hundreds more, in one of the bloodiest attacks in the two-year Saudi-led campaign in Yemen. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 15:27:52 GMT)

Great British Bake Off to be sponsored by Lyle's Golden Syrup and Dr Oetker
Bakers’ ingredients makers sign joint £4m deal to cover the first series, Christmas specials and the spin-off An Extra Slice The Great British Bake Off has found its final ingredients, with the kitchen cupboard staple Lyle’s golden syrup and Dr Oetker, the baking product maker, signing multi-million pound deals to be the first sponsors of the biggest show on British television.The hunt for a sponsor has been one of the biggest-ever charm offensives undertaken by Channel 4 – which included presenters Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith appearing at an event designed to woo some of the UK’s biggest-spending brands – but it did not cook up an X-Factor-sized deal on its first outing. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:01:28 GMT)

Liam Fox demands meeting with BBC over 'negative' Brexit stories
Lib Dems accuse minister of ‘blatant attempt at intimidating’ broadcaster with letter to director generalLiam Fox has demanded a meeting with the BBC’s director general in a letter where he complains that the corporation consistently runs negative stories about the economic effects of Brexit.The international trade secretary wrote to Tony Hall to ask for a face-to-face meeting about the coverage, which the Liberal Democrats said was the behaviour of “a tin-pot dictator”. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 17:23:01 GMT)

Labour would leave single market, says Jeremy Corbyn
Labour leader says market membership is dependent on being in EU, but party would seek to mirror its benefits with trade dealA Labour government would leave the single market because it is “dependent on membership of the EU” but seek a trade deal that mirrored the free trade benefits, Jeremy Corbyn has said.The Labour leader’s explanation of his party’s Brexit policy was questioned by the former shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna, one of the party’s leading advocates of a soft Brexit, who pointed out that several countries including Norway were members of the single market without being full EU members. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 11:05:11 GMT)

Man dies after struggle in east London shop following police chase
IPCC investigating incident in which 20-year-old allegedly seen trying to swallow an object before being taken illA 20-year-old man has died after being chased and apprehended by police in east London.The man, named locally as Rashan Charles, was allegedly seen trying to swallow an object before being taken ill, and was pronounced dead in a hospital a short time later. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 12:26:42 GMT)

Child treated for HIV at birth is healthy nine years on without further treatment
Researchers say case of child infected at birth but no longer displaying symptoms may spare others long-term therapy A child who was infected with HIV at birth and given a short course of treatment has remained healthy for the last nine years without further drugs, according to scientists at a conference in Paris, in a case that could give hope to children born with the virus.Researchers say they hope to learn from the case of the child, born in South Africa, to save others from having to take powerful daily medication as they are growing up and for the rest of their lives. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 08:00:31 GMT)

'I just want to go home': German teenager who joined Isis speaks of regrets – reports
Linda Wenzel, 16, who is being held in an Iraqi prison after joining the jihadist group, says she wants to get away from the warA German teenager who joined Islamic State is now being held in detention in Iraq and says she regrets joining the jihadist group and just wants to come home to her family, media reported. Der Spiegel magazine reported that four German women who joined Isis in recent years, including a 16-year-old girl from the small town of Pulsnitz near Dresden, were being held in an Iraqi prison and receiving consular assistance. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 01:55:50 GMT)

VW calls crisis meeting to discuss EU cartel inquiry, source says
German auto industry accused of collusion after claims VW, Audi, Porsche, Mercedes and BMW discussed pricing at meetingsVolkswagen is to hold a special supervisory board meeting on Wednesday to discuss allegations that German carmakers operated a wide-ranging cartel, a source familiar with the matter has said. The European commission said on Saturday antitrust regulators were investigating a possible German automotive industry cartel after a tipoff. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:46:00 GMT)

European and African ministers discuss plan to tackle flow of refugees
Meeting in Tunis follows pressure from UN refugee agency, which says EU efforts to train Libyan coastguard are not enoughEuropean and African ministers are to meet in Tunis on Monday to discuss a plan to try to regularise the flow of refugees from Africa to Europe to about 20,000, coupled with a much tougher strategy to deport illegal migrants from Italy and break up smuggling rings.The plan to regularise the migrant flow is being pushed by the UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, which warns that EU efforts to train the Libyan coastguard along with Italy’s intention to impose a new code of conduct on NGO rescue ships operating in the Mediterranean do not match the scale of the problem, or recognise the extent to which the flow of refugees and migrants is likely to become permanent. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 04:00:26 GMT)

Greece plans return to bond market as Athens sees end in sight to austerity
Successful issue of new five-year bonds would help crisis-hit country exit long cycle of austerity and bailoutsAthens has outlined plans to return to the financial markets for the first time since 2014, with a plan to sell new five-year bonds to investors.Existing Greek five-year bonds were trading at 3.6% on Monday morning compared with 63% at the height of the Greek financial crisis in 2012 when the finance ministry was unable to pay public sector wages and there were riots in the streets. Following the announcement that Athens would be returning to the market, the yield fell to 3.4%. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:18:12 GMT)

'We found it rolled up in a tube': Alice Cooper discovers Warhol classic after 40 years
Silkscreen from Death and Disaster series sat in storage among other artefactsRocker became friends with Warhol in New York in the 1960sThe rock star Alice Cooper has found an Andy Warhol masterpiece that could be worth millions “rolled up in a tube” in a storage locker, where it lay forgotten for more than 40 years. Related: Andy Warhol’s Electric Chair, 1964: a dark mirror to pop art Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 06:00:29 GMT)

Turkish activists decry attack on press freedom as journalists stand trial
Charges include claims that Cumhuriyet journalists helped the separatist Kurdistan Workers party and Gülen movementThe trial of 17 reporters and executives from Cumhuriyet, one of Turkey’s last standing opposition newspapers, is set to begin on Monday with rights activists decrying the continuing muzzling of free speech in one of the world’s largest jailers of journalists. The charges include accusations that the newspaper’s journalists aided the separatist Kurdistan Workers party (PKK) and the Fethullah Gülen movement, which is widely believed in Turkey to have orchestrated last year’s coup attempt, and complaints of irregularities in the elections of the organisation’s board of executives. Rights activists say the trial is an assault on freedom of expression and the accusations are absurd, because Cumhuriyet, the country’s newspaper of record that is committed to secularism, has long warned of the dangers of the Gülen movement, which itself has long been at odds with the PKK. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 03:00:25 GMT)

Wall Street duo make $150m each on back of Trump election victory
Shareholdings of CEOs at JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs surged by $314m far outstripping bosses at US and European rivalsThe bankers running JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs saw their shareholdings rocket in value by $314m last year due to the stock market surge following Donald Trump’s election as US president.The JPMorgan boss, Jamie Dimon, and the Goldman Sachs chief executive, Lloyd Blankfein, enjoyed rises of more than $150m (£115m) each in the value of their stock and options in the banks they run, according to an annual review of bank CEO pay by Equilar for the Financial Times (paywall). Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:36:39 GMT)

Rome facing water rationing as Italy suffers driest spring for 60 years
Rainfalls 80% below normal have affected farming across the country and could result in the capital’s famous fountains being turned offScarce rain and chronically leaky aqueducts have combined to put Romans at risk of drastic water rationing as soon as this week.Sky TG24 TV meteorologists noted on Sunday that Italy had experienced one of its driest springs in some 60 years and that some parts of the country had seen rainfall totals 80% below normal. Among the hardest-hit regions was Sardinia, which is seeking natural disaster status. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 02:06:57 GMT)

Greece launches first bond sale since 2014, as IMF cuts UK growth forecasts - business live
All the day’s economic and financial news, as Athens looks to end its three-year banishment from the marketsLatest: Greece to sell debt again.....also offering to buy back some existing debtDeal could help Athens return to the marketsSix banks hired to handle the dealEarlier:Eurozone companies post growth in JulyIMF cuts UK growth forecast to 1.7% this yearIMF report: The Key Points 3.08pm BST Another newsflash from America, but this one is less encouraging. The number of home sales slumped by 1.8% in June, suggesting the housing market may be cooling.US 'Existing Home Sales' lower than expected for June . . . pic.twitter.com/hfFktELuWvExisting home sales fall 1.8% in June, miss estimates at 5.52 million units ...Not looking good ... 2.55pm BST Newsflash! America’s private sector is growing at its fastest pace since JanuaryUS companies are expanding in July, thanks to a boom in new orders that is driving employment up.US flash #PMI surveys signal fastest growth for 6 months in July (though merely signal c2% GDP growth) https://t.co/fuZAZcD1Ow pic.twitter.com/tCq1ez5Jd9“The overall rate of expansion remains modest rather than impressive. The surveys are historically consistent with annualized GDP growth of approximately 2%, but the signs are that growth could accelerate further in coming months.“Most encouraging was an upturn in new order inflows to the second-highest seen over the past two years, which helped push the rate of job creation to the highest so far this year, indicative of non-farm payrolls growing at a rate of around 200,000. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 14:08:12 GMT)

Pokémon Go fans enraged as first festival ends in connectivity disaster
Developer booed on stage as gamers left unable to connect to play popular augmented reality game after mobile networks and servers overloaded The first ever, official Pokémon Go Fest collapsed into chaos on Saturday, after attendees who had queued for hours for the chance to catch Legendary Pokémon Lugia found the game almost unplayable due to overloaded mobile phone networks.Developer Niantic has apologised to fans, offering a full refund on the $20 ticket, $100 worth of in-game Pokécoins, and giving a Lugia to all registered attendees, but the event still casts a shadow over what was supposed to be a very public celebration of the game’s first anniversary. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:00:15 GMT)

Afghanistan: dozens dead in Kabul bombing targeting government workers
The attack mainly killed employees of the Afghan ministry of mines and petroleum, according to Kabul policeThe Taliban have killed at least 38 people and wounded dozens more in a suicide bomb attack against a bus carrying government employees in the Afghan capital, Kabul, according to officials.The attack happened in the western part of the city during rush hour, and mainly killed employees of the Afghan ministry of mines and petroleum, according to Kabul police. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 04:59:24 GMT)

Boris Johnson jokes traditional Māori greeting could start Glasgow pub fight
UK foreign secretary is visiting New Zealand for two days as Britain looks to strengthen its ties with its former colony in preparation for BrexitThe British foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, joked on his visit to New Zealand on Monday that a traditional Māori greeting could be misinterpreted as a head butt in other countries.Johnson is visiting the South Pacific nation for two days as Britain looks to strengthen its ties with its former colony amid a broader reshaping of Britain’s global relationships as it prepares to leave the European Union. Topics on the agenda include trade, foreign policy and international security. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 04:59:42 GMT)

Justine Damond's fiance says he regrets not staying on phone before shooting
Don Damond describes final call as godmother says Justine hoped to return to Australia due to fears of US gun violenceThe fiance of Justine Damond, the woman killed by a Minneapolis police officer, is haunted by their last conversation.On the night of 15 July, she called to tell him she heard what sounded like a rape happening in the alleyway behind their home. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 02:42:05 GMT)

'Human-trafficking' tragedy: nine die in sweltering Texas truck
Police ‘looking at a human trafficking crime’ after driver arrestedWalmart CCTV footage shows vehicles picking up people from trailerAt least nine people died after being crammed into a sweltering tractor-trailer found parked outside a Walmart in the midsummer Texas heat, authorities said on Sunday as they described an immigrant-smuggling attempt gone wrong.The driver was arrested and nearly 20 others rescued from the rig were hospitalized in dire condition, many with extreme dehydration and heatstroke, officials said. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 21:28:36 GMT)

Two killed in shooting at Israeli embassy in Jordan
Israel refuses to allow Jordanian authorities to question embassy guard who killed two men at its Amman compoundAn Israeli embassy security guard shot dead a Jordanian man who attacked him with a screwdriver at Israel’s embassy compound in Amman on Sunday night, police said. A second Jordanian man also died in the incident. Israel is refusing to allow Jordanian authorities to question the security guard under the Vienna convention, claiming diplomatic immunity, and all embassy employees are currently confined to the compound, according to Israeli media. Jordan is reportedly refusing to allow the guard to leave the country. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 07:21:02 GMT)

Feline sad: cat who was 'mayor' of Alaskan town for 20 years dies
Stubbs, who liked to drink water and catnip from a margarita glass, was elected mayor of Talkeetna in 1998 Stubbs, the honorary feline mayor of the Alaska town of Talkeetna, has died at the age of 20.The animal’s owners announced the cat’s death late on Saturday in a statement. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Jul 2017 00:48:02 GMT)

Trump not convinced Russian meddling took place, communications chief says
Scaramucci: Trump’s view is ‘maybe they did it, maybe they didn’t do it’White House sends mixed signals about new sanctions against MoscowDonald Trump remains unconvinced that Russia interfered in last year’s US election, his new communications chief said on Sunday, as the White House gave mixed signals about whether it would approve new sanctions against Moscow. Related: Pardon me? Legal experts doubt Trump could absolve himself in Russia inquiry Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 15:19:53 GMT)

Israel refuses to remove metal detectors from mosque despite rising violence
Israelis and Palestinians braced for further confrontations in Jerusalem as death toll rises in wake of new security crackdownIsraeli officials have said they will not remove metal detectors from outside a Jerusalem mosque, despite their installation triggering rapidly escalating confrontations with Palestinians.Amid a mounting toll of deaths and injuries in the crisis, Israelis and Palestinians are braced for weeks of confrontation, as both sides appeared to dig in to their positions. Continue reading...
(Sun, 23 Jul 2017 12:53:55 GMT)

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