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'Ghost tower' bought up by foreign money is symbol of housing crisis
Exclusive: Russian billionaire and Kyrgyz tycoon among owners of often empty flats at London’s St George Wharf skyscraper A Russian billionaire whose business partner is a close ally of Vladimir Putin, the former chairman of a defunct Nigerian bank and a Kyrgyz vodka tycoon appear to be among more than 130 foreign buyers in Britain’s tallest residential skyscraper.Almost two-thirds of homes in the Tower, a 50-storey apartment complex in London, are in foreign ownership, with a quarter held through secretive offshore companies based in tax havens, a Guardian investigation has revealed. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:16:30 GMT)

Google offices in Paris raided by tax authorities
About 100 investigators search tech firm’s HQ as part of inquiry into tax payments, reports claimFrench investigators have raided Google’s Paris headquarters, saying the company is now under investigation for aggravated financial fraud and organised money laundering.In a major escalation of France’s long running enquiry into Google’s tax affairs, magistrates revealed Tuesday that the software giant is suspected of evading taxes by failing to declare the full extent of its activities in France. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:36:33 GMT)

Ex-Cameron aide attacks establishment 'bullying' of Jeremy Corbyn
Steve Hilton says he found ‘much to welcome’ in Labour leader’s ascent, and predicts victory for Donald Trump in USSteve Hilton, the prime minister’s former “blue skies thinker,” has said the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has been “bullied” by the Westminster establishment because of his unconventional approach to politics.David Cameron used a Commons encounter with Corbyn in February to take him to task for not properly fastening a tie, saying: “I know what my mother would say. I think she’d look across the dispatch box and she’d say: put on a proper suit, do up your tie and sing the national anthem.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:59:58 GMT)

Eric Cantona: ‘I love José Mourinho but he is not Manchester United’
The French legend, in an exclusive interview on his 50th birthday, says Pep Guardiola is the only manager capable of ‘changing Manchester’ and explains why he will be cheering on England at Euro 2016 – not FranceEric Cantona turned 50 on Tuesday and is still doing what he has always done best: playing the part of Eric Cantona to a tee. For Manchester United fans still digesting the end of the soured Louis van Gaal era and the imminent arrival of José Mourinho, he has a simple diagnosis of what has gone wrong.“They miss me,” Cantona says, playful but serious at the same time. “I think they have lost something. You can feel it. But it’s difficult to come after someone who has been at the club 25 years. Even if you are a great manager, the fans still feel the philosophy of Ferguson.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:43:43 GMT)

Glastonbury festival fined over sewage leak
Judge finds festival had low culpability for incident in 2014 that led to death of 42 fish in Whitelake riverGlastonbury festival has been ordered to pay £31,000 after thousands of gallons of human sewage leaked out of a steel container tank, seeped into a stream and killed fish. The Environment Agency claimed during a hearing that the event had grown more quickly than its ability to deal with so much waste. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:13:16 GMT)

Alleged Bill Cosby victim's 2005 sexual assault report read at court hearing
Andrea Constand was not present when testimony, in which she claims Cosby gave her pills before violating her, was shared as evidence to prosecute comedianAndrea Constand told authorities that Bill Cosby violated her sexually after giving her three pills that made her dizzy, blurry-eyed and nauseated and left her legs feeling “like jelly”, according to a police report read at a court hearing Tuesday.“I told him, ‘I can’t even talk, Mr Cosby.’ I started to panic,” the former Temple University athletic department employee told police in 2005. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:41:50 GMT)

Syrian airbase used by Russia damaged in Isis attack – report
US intelligence company Stratfor says satellite images suggest four helicopters and 20 lorries destroyed at T-4 baseSatellite imagery appears to show extensive damage to an airbase used by Russian forces in Syria after an attack by Isis fighters, the US intelligence company Stratfor has said.The images suggest four helicopters and 20 lorries were destroyed by fire at the T-4 base, also known as Tiyas, which is strategically located in central Syria between war-ravaged Palmyra and Homs. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:33:22 GMT)

Brexit offers no residency guarantees for Britons or Europeans, PM says
David Cameron says vote to leave may lead to loss of rights for Britons living in EU, including over healthcare and propertyMillions of EU workers face uncertainty over whether they can stay in the UK if voters choose to leave the union, while British people living in Europe could also lose the right to remain, own property or get free healthcare, David Cameron has claimed. The prime minister said there was no guarantee either group would maintain their residential rights unless British people voted to remain during the 23 June referendum. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:03:16 GMT)

Surgery should be used to treat type 2 diabetes, say international experts
Guidance says operations to shrink stomach should be offered to anyone with condition who is obese if other methods have not succeededStomach-shrinking surgery should be a routine treatment for people with type 2 diabetes, international experts say, recommending it be offered to as many as 100,000 people in the UK.A mere 6,000 people with the condition have surgery at the moment and the numbers have dropped from 8,800 three years ago as the NHS has comes under increasing financial pressure. But experts say more operations, costing £5,000 to £6,000 a time, would save money in the long term on diabetes medication and the cost of treating complications, which include heart attacks and strokes as well as blindness and foot amputations. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:19:56 GMT)

Google aims to kill passwords by the end of this year
Android users will be able to log in to services using a combination of their face, typing patterns, and how they move Google will begin testing an alternative to passwords next month, in a move that could do away with complicated logins for good.The new feature, introduced to developers at the company’s I/O conference, is called the Trust API, and will initially be tested with “several very large financial institutions” in June, according to Google’s Daniel Kaufman. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 12:54:59 GMT)

The best of the Chelsea flower show
This year’s gold and silver medallists at Chelsea, from the best in show Telegraph garden’s bronze fins to a garden for car enthusiastsDesigner Andy Sturgeon’s “Captured Landscape” is said to have been inspired by the magnitude of geological events that have moulded our landscape over millions of years. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:15:22 GMT)

Tracey Emin: 'The stone I married is beautiful and dignified – it will never let me down'
She may now prefer horse-riding to hell-raising, but Tracey Emin is still full of attitude. As she takes a break from the art world, she talks about the ‘horrible’ press, banning high heels – and why a paleolithic partner is a perfect pick-me-upThe last time Tracey Emin opened an exhibition of her work – in Hong Kong in March – she caused international headlines by announcing that she had married a stone in the garden of her house in the south of France. The artist’s latest exhibition, at Lehmann Maupin in New York, continues the theme. It’s called Stone Love, although the title, picked out in one of her famous neons, is actually taken from the first line of Soul Love, by her late friend David Bowie: “Stone love, she kneels before the grave / A brave son, who gave his life to save the slogans.” Related: Don’t mock the rock – Tracey Emin’s wedding is a message to single women | Gaby Hinsliff Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:30:56 GMT)

Full petal jacket: the new meaning of floral prints
Flowers aren’t just for Chelsea. Thanks to Adele, Gucci and Harry Styles, they’re on-trend and on the catwalk, too. From ditsy florals to succulents, what’s your tribe?‘Florals for spring? Groundbreaking.” Time was when the idea of flowers having any kudos in the world of proper fashion was so risible that it became a crushing one-liner in The Devil Wears Prada. But fast-forward a decade and Miranda Priestly’s put-down to her editorial staff is seriously dated, because in 2016 flowers pack a real punch in fashion. Not such much in that it’s cool to go to the Chelsea flower show or because bouquet-bragging is one of the more nauseating aspects of Instagram, but because flower prints have lost their intentionally inoffensive it’s-just-a-pretty-pattern vibes and have started to actually signify something. They have become a reasonably sophisticated way of semaphoring your wardrobe message: you really can say it with flowers (sorry). Everyone has succumbed to the floral trend in recent months – from Harry Styles on the red carpet, to Adele in the video for Send My Love to Hillary Clinton on some campaign downtime. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:01:58 GMT)

The death of bohemia: can the dream survive in gentrified New York?
As institutions such as the Chelsea hotel struggle to survive, the writer Ed Hamilton is trying to capture the city’s free spirit before it’s lost foreverThe Chelsea hotel, on West 23rd Street, is still standing. But it is much diminished from the glory days when it hosted the likes of Dylan Thomas, Sid Vicious and Warhol’s Chelsea Girls. The halls are dusty from sheetrock; the doors are plastic sheets taped to the wall. Developers are hoping to turn the place into a luxury hotel or condos. But there are still some people still clinging to the place.Ed Hamilton always wanted to be a short-story writer. He arrived in New York a little over two decades ago, at the age of 30, moving with his wife from the Maryland suburbs. “I always wanted to come to New York, my wife always wanted to come to New York, and our jobs ended so we decided to just go ahead and do it,” Hamilton told me on a recent afternoon, sitting in a large, worn red armchair in the room he shares with his wife at the Chelsea. He’s only recently published his first book of short stories, titled The Chintz Age. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:37:53 GMT)

Malachi Kirby on remaking Roots: ‘I could feel the pain, hear the screams'
It was the most-watched show in TV history, a shocking story of slavery – and now it’s back. The British actor relives the ordeal of playing Kunta KinteNobody could say Malachi Kirby hasn’t earned his breakthrough. Over five and a half months, he was shackled, assaulted, abused, imprisoned, beaten, whipped, mutilated and subjected to all manner of psychological torture and torment. On top of that, he went through the physical equivalent of a triathlon: running, swimming, horse-riding, rowing and fighting. “It pushed me to my limits and beyond,” says the 26-year-old Londoner. “There wasn’t one day that didn’t challenge me – physically, mentally, spiritually, emotionally. Sometimes it was the heat, sometimes the cold, the mosquitoes, the horse. Sometimes it was just having to run in shoes that were too big.”Kirby plays Kunta Kinte, the hero of Alex Haley’s Roots – first a Pulitzer-winning, bestselling novel, then a blockbuster TV event of the 1970s. It has now been remade – or rather retold – as an expensive eight-hour miniseries, also starring Forest Whitaker, Laurence Fishburne and Anna Paquin. Haley’s story claimed (though its authenticity has since been disputed) to chronicle the author’s ancestors from 18th-century Africa up to his own life in the 20th-century US. It begins with Kunta, a Mandinka warrior abducted from Gambia and forced to work as a slave on plantations in the American south, and who defies his captors at every stage. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:21:01 GMT)

Ignoring family ties: is it really best for children? | Rosie Lewis
A foster mother – and adopter – on why Cameron’s changes to the adoption process are a step too farI’ll never forget the anguish I felt when I waved goodbye to the children I had fostered for nearly three years. Tess and Harry, gorgeous blonde-haired, brown-eyed siblings, came to stay with our family when they were both less than 18 months old and left when they were almost ready for school.I was so anxious the day I was introduced to their adopters that I burst into tears before we even shook hands. It was the relief as much as anything else; the eagerness on their faces and kindness in their eyes reassuring me the siblings would be safe in their arms. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:00:09 GMT)

Dr Zee, the godfather of legal highs: 'I test everything on myself'
From ‘miaow miaow’ to the methspresso machine, Dr Zee has spent years creating new drugs faster than the British government can legislate against. But is he a freedom fighter – or a brainier version of your average dealer?Dr Zee, the Israeli chemist credited with kicking off the legal highs market in the UK, is showing off his latest invention. Unlike his other discoveries – most notably mephedrone, which caused a media panic in 2009 when tabloids ran scare stories about “miaow miaow” and “plant food” – this one can’t be snorted or swallowed. Instead, it’s a black plastic box that looks rather like a coffee-maker. “I think maybe we’ll call it the methspresso machine,” he says, while showcasing it on a new documentary, The Last Days of Legal Highs. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:32:33 GMT)

Stubble trouble – the meanings of men's wannabe beards
If a man’s face is his personality’s canvas, what do the ‘soul patch’ and the baby tache signify? If the face is a canvas, stubble can have an altering effect, but it can be more of a botch – think of the bizarre amateur restoration of the Spanish Ecce Homo fresco – than a masterpiece. There are no hard-and-fast rules with stubble growth – which might be part of the problem. Unless you are a vigilant self-groomer, the line between “attractive stubble growth” and sporting the look of someone who has fallen into an tar-black pit of endless despair can be indistinct and vague. Here’s what some recent famous stubble growth signifies … Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:13:30 GMT)

Thrinder or Three-Ender: why Tinder’s upset about how you say 3nder
The creators of a threesome app claim to embrace various pronunciations of its name – true to their openminded values – but they are still being sued for trademark infringementName: 3nder.Age: Two. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:14:18 GMT)

How to eat out if you're vegan
Which are the best cuisines for vegans? Our chefs and writers’ tips on what to order, what to avoid and what to ask. Plus, the best vegan-friendly restaurants around the country and where to eat on the high streetShare your own restaurant tips and experiences – good and bad – belowVegetarians are now relatively well catered for in the UK, but if you want to avoid animal products such as eggs and dairy altogether, it’s tougher to find a restaurant to meet your needs. There are lots of great places if you’re open to those that are not exclusively vegan, but it pays to have some careful questions handy. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 09:32:01 GMT)

Brain vs stomach: why dieting is so hard | Dean Burnett
The debate over whether fat is actually bad for our health overlooks a more fundamental issue: if we know something is bad for us, why can’t we stop eating it? The weird relationship between our brains and digestive systems holds the answerA recent report by the National Obesity Forum stated that official advice about low-fat diets is wrong. As ever, there’s now heated debate over how valid/accurate this claim is. But let’s step back a moment and ask a revealing question: why do official government dietary guidelines even exist? Why are they necessary?From an entirely logical position, eating food fulfils several requirements. It provides the energy to do things, helps us build up stores of energy for when needed, and provides the materials required to build and maintain our bodies. Therefore, the human body requires a regular intake of nutrients, vitamins and calories to maintain day-to-day functioning. As a result, the human body has developed an intricate digestive system to monitor and regulate our food intake. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 12:34:18 GMT)

Donald Trump takes poll lead over Hillary Clinton – is it time to panic?
The latest presidential polling average shows the Republican candidate ahead by 0.2 percentage points. But this is not the first indication of a potential Trump winFor the first time, Republican Donald Trump seems to have edged ahead of Democrat Hillary Clinton in presidential polling. But only just. What does it mean and should those opposed to Trump be worried? Related: Reality check: Does the electoral map work in Trump's favor? Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 May 2016 17:32:18 GMT)

How we made the Dyson vacuum cleaner
James Dyson: ‘When I saw industrial cyclones sucking up sawdust, my instincts kicked in’In the late 1970s, I bought the most powerful vacuum cleaner on the market – the Hoover Junior. I got irritated when it started losing suction and tore the bag open. Its pores were clogged with dust: a fundamental flaw, but valuable to the industry because it meant consumers continually had to buy new bags. At the time, consumables were worth something like £500m a year. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:25:44 GMT)

Sleepwalkers' stories: 'I could have died and no one would have known' | Guardian readers and Sarah Marsh
One in 50 adults are believed to suffer from episodes of sleepwalking. Here, five people tell us about their experiencesPolice covered up a naked sleepwalker in Manchester this weekend after finding them wandering the streets.The person in question is said to have seen the funny side of their nocturnal adventures, asking for a selfie from the officers who found them. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 12:28:25 GMT)

'I began to accept the thought of death': Fort McMurray school students on fleeing the wildfire
Three weeks ago a raging wildfire forced a mass evacuation in Fort McMurray, Alberta. A teacher and her students describe the day the fire engulfed their town, how they cope with the loss and and their determination to return and rebuildPatricia Budd is a writer and English teacher at Father Patrick Mercredi community high school in Fort McMurray, a city in the heart of Alberta’s oil sands. On 3 May, she was one of 88,000 people forced to flee the city from unprecedented wildfires. Soon after her escape along with her husband, Simon, and their Maltese terrier, Budd responded to a Guardian callout asking for witness accounts. “This is a tragedy beyond psychological scope,” she wrote. “The mind refuses to take it all in. I find I am addicted to the news and social media. And, like a bad habit, I watch horror scenes and relive fears, emphatically live through the terrors of my fellow citizens until I can no longer cope. I shut off the phone only to masochistically turn it back on. I hate knowing. I desperately need to know.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:01:10 GMT)

Homefront: The Revolution review – an ambitious, but flawed shooter
With its open-world environment and emphasis on crafting, this is an interesting sequel, marred by glitches and frame rate issuesFor years, the mainstream games industry has been accused of lacking ambition. The default strategy is to rely on big-budget franchises that get updated on an annual basis – until they stop selling. It’s refreshing, then, when a developer attempts something that palpably aims to push boundaries. That’s what Dambuster Studios has done with Homefront: The Revolution, a fully open-world first-person shooter with an unusual cooperative multiplayer mode and an eye-catching story premise. Unfortunately, the resulting game is beset by technical problems. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:01:33 GMT)

Explosions in the sky: why Mount Etna erupting is as pretty as a painting
Turi Caggegi’s recent volcanic YouTube footage is uncannily similar to Joseph Wright’s 18th-century art of Vesuvius – both capture an Italian night on fireImages of Mount Etna spewing molten rock and fire in its latest eruption reveal once again the astonishing and dangerous beauty of volcanoes. These living mountains can be colossally destructive, yet Etna’s frequent eruptions are “Strombolian” events, sending superheated rock and fire-lit ash high in the air without the fast-moving pyroclastic flows that can be devastating to human life. Over the weekend, Sicilian journalist Turi Caggegi was able to get near the summit with a video camera and capture the wonder of a night on fire. Apart from their luminous beauty, these images of an Italian volcano vindicate one of Britain’s greatest painters. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:52:41 GMT)

‘Grow three herbs and build up’ – the millennial’s guide to gardening
Horticultural skills are going to pot among people in their 20s and 30s, says the head of the RHS. Here’s a quick guide to getting started for this ‘lost generation’When to prick out and when to pinch out, what to dead-head and what to mulch – the Royal Horticultural Society says a whole “lost generation” of people in their 20s and 30s have no idea when it comes to gardening. It has led to back gardens suppressed by decking, front gardens concreted over and used to park the car. “For a lot of them, their parents just didn’t teach them gardening and we lost a lot of the skills,” Sue Biggs, director-general of the RHS, told the Times. But she also blamed the rise of buy-to-let and the housing crisis, which has made it harder for younger people to buy their own homes, and so literally to put down roots. So how can millennials get involved? Two experts advise: Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 May 2016 17:41:00 GMT)

French Open 2016: Tsonga, Azarenka, Ferrer, Laura Robson and more – live!
Live updates from the third day of play at Roland GarrosAndy Murray fights back to beat Stepanek in five sets at French OpenAustralian Open champion Kerber loses to Kiki Bertens in ParisEmail nick.miller@theguardian.com or tweet @NickMiller79 5.21pm BST And more woe for the Brits - Robson has been broken at the start of the second set - she trails Petkovic 6-2, 2-1 with the German currently serving. 5.19pm BST David Ferrer has won, and at some pace too - he takes the final set to love, beating Donskoy 6-1, 6-2, 6-0.Meanwhile Konta is struggling early doors, having already been broken in the first set - she trails Goerges 4-1. Also, it looks like Azarenka’s injury is a right knee problem, rather than a back issue. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:21:40 GMT)

14 Russians guilty of doping at Beijing Olympics, suggests state media
• Majority of positive samples come from track and field events• News casts further doubts over Russia’s participation in RioFourteen of the 31 athletes found to have doped at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing are Russian, according to the country’s state media.A report by Tass suggests that the majority of those 14 individuals compete in track and field events, putting Russia’s athletics participation at Rio 2016 in further doubt. An International Association of Athletics Federations taskforce has already been set up to decide whether Russia’s athletes will be allowed to compete in Brazil following revelations of state-sponsored doping in the country, with a decision to be made on 17 June. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:58:17 GMT)

Arsenal become first club to top £100m mark in Premier League payments
• Arsène Wenger’s side featured 27 times on live television last season• Champions Leicester received less in total than four other clubsArsenal became the first club in history to receive more than £100m from the Premier League last season, according to figures released on Tuesday.Despite finishing as runners-up to Leicester City, Arsène Wenger’s side were featured live on television in 27 different matches – 12 more than Claudio Ranieri’s title winners. That meant Arsenal’s total earnings from the Premier League amounted to a staggering £100,952,257, including “facility fees” of almost £21.5m, prize money of £23.6m for finishing second and almost £55m for domestic and overseas TV rights and commercial deals. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:08:59 GMT)

Chris Gayle’s latest excruciating interview and his startling race remarks | The Spin
If Chris Gayle wants journalists to stop trying to undermine him, he should probably stop undermining himselfChop, along with bogan, root, and one or two others, is an Australian word you may not know before you go, but will soon pick up after you get there. For the unfamiliar, Freddie Flintoff provided the perfect gloss back in January when he used it to describe Chris Gayle’s behaviour in his infamous interview – “Don’t blush baby” – with Channel Ten’s Mel McLaughlin. “Big fan of @henrygayle,” Flintoff wrote, “but made himself look a bit of a chop there.” So, no need to look it up in the Australian Dictionary of Slang the next time you hear it. Because it fits, in a way its loose English equivalents – prat, wally – wouldn’t quite. Flintoff always did have the happy knack of needling people with a telling word or two. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:57:17 GMT)

Middlesbrough set to sign Viktor Fischer from Ajax for £3.8m
• Denmark international on his way to Teesside to discuss personal terms• Fischer has only one year of contract with Ajax remainingMiddlesbrough are poised to make Viktor Fischer their first signing of the summer after agreeing to pay Ajax €5m (£3.8m) for the Denmark international.Fischer, 21, travelled to England on Tuesday to discuss personal terms after a successful bid from Aitor Karanka’s side beat off competition from the big-spending Austrian side Red Bull Salzburg. The 21-year-old is due to have his medical on Teesside on Wednesday before returning to join the Danish national side ahead of the friendly against Bosnia-Herzegovina next week. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:58:21 GMT)

David Squires on … Louis van Gaal's Manchester United swansong
This week, David Squires looks back at Manchester United’s FA Cup final win … and the end of Louis van Gaal at Old Trafford. And you can find David’s archive of cartoons hereDavid Squires on … the end of the Premier League seasonDavid Squires on … memories of working for West Ham at Upton Park Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 09:24:25 GMT)

Manu Tuilagi to miss England’s Australia tour with hamstring injury
• Centre ruled out after limping out of Premiership semi-final defeat• Coach Eddie Jones: It’s bad luck for Manu so close to the tourManu Tuilagi will miss England’s tour to Australia next month with a hamstring problem, the Rugby Football Union has announced. Related: Rugby union: talking points from the Premiership and Pro12 play-offs Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:12:16 GMT)

County cricket – live!
• Today we have Will Macpherson reporting from Hampshire v Notts• County Cricket: the week’s final over 5.20pm BST Bumble knows what’s what:Cracking Roses match in prospect starting Sunday #spicy 5.17pm BST Right, so Reece Topley’s out for three months. Partial stress fracture of the lumbar spine. No, me neither. Adam Wheater played a very stupid shot to get out to Fletcher, trying to pull but just being caught at mid-on off the top edge. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:20:54 GMT)

BMX star Dave Mirra had brain trauma disease CTE when he died, doctors say
Mirra, 41, killed himself in South Carolina in FebruaryCTE linked to memory loss, depression and dementia Dave Mirra, the BMX icon who killed himself in February aged 41, had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the chronic brain disease that has been found in dozens of former NFL players, a University of Toronto doctor has concluded. Several other neuropathologists confirmed the diagnosis, according to ESPN.Mirra is the first BMX rider to be diagnosed with CTE, a disease tied to repeated brain trauma and associated with symptoms such as memory loss, depression and progressive dementia. Mirra was found dead in Greenville, South Carolina on 4 February from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:30:48 GMT)

José Mourinho dividing opinion among Manchester United’s global fanbase | Paul MacInnes
There are the fans who go to the games, and then there are fans who have never been to England let alone Old Trafford. Don’t expect all of them to agreeSome people are worrying that José Mourinho might mean the end of the Manchester United way. They’re fretting that fast-paced attacking football and the development of local talent might be a thing of the past. They’re looking at the way an (admittedly unloved) manager was effectively sacked behind his back and are concerned about what that says about the club. These people are Manchester United fans and their opinions don’t really matter. Related: Eric Cantona: ‘I love José Mourinho but he is not Manchester United’ Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:41:19 GMT)

Liverpool and Manchester United fined for chants during Europa League
• Both clubs have half of £30,000 fine suspended• Uefa imposes further fines on clubs following last-16 tieLiverpool and Manchester United have been fined €40,000 (£30,565) each – half of which has been suspended – for illicit chanting by their fans during March’s two-legged Europa League clash. Related: Eric Cantona: ‘I love José Mourinho but he is not Manchester United’ Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:25:16 GMT)

'Chewbacca Mom' meets James Corden and JJ Abrams – video
Candace Payne, whose video of herself in a Chewbacca mask video went viral last week, appears alongside Star Wars director JJ Abrams on CBS’s Late Late Show with James Corden on Monday. The video was posted on the official Late Late show with James Corden YouTube pageJJ Abrams: ‘Star Wars fans are passionate and obsessive. And I’m one of them’ Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:15:04 GMT)

Neuro cuisine: exploring the science of flavour – video
Tamal Ray, anaesthetist and baker, Professor Charles Spence, experimental psychologist at the University of Oxford and chef Jozef Youssef embark on a journey to decode the science of flavour. Professor Spence and Jozef challenge Tamal to explore how sight, sound and touch alter his perception of the flavour of food. Supported by SEAT Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 May 2016 06:00:04 GMT)

Tim Burton on Alice Through the Looking Glass – video interview
Tim Burton, the producer of the followup to Alice in Wonderland (which he directed), talks about the enduring power of fairytales and folk stories and about the ‘different energy’ of James Bobin, who has directed this film. Bobin discusses narrative confusion among those who haven’t read Lewis Carroll’s books and how Alice Liddell – who inspired them – was of the same generation as the suffragettes Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:49:48 GMT)

The forgotten children of China's prisoners – video
In a government building in Nanzhao, the Zhang children’s father awaits his fate. He accidentally killed a child and will probably be executed. The Chinese state makes no provision for prisoners’ children. The Sun Village orphanage takes in sisters Wei and Yan and their brother Won, but without their father they cannot verify their legal status. Will the children ever be able to study and work? Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:00:02 GMT)

Exclusive: Pentagon source goes on record against whistleblower program – video
A former Pentagon investigator has spoken on record to the Guardian about major privacy and security lapses within the government’s whistleblower program. John Crane, who for 25 years worked for the Department of Defense inspector general’s office, which helps federal employees expose abuse and corruption, says whistleblowers like Edward Snowden had little choice but to go outside the system. His revelations can now be made public for the first timeSnowden calls for whistleblower shield after claims by Pentagon sourceLong read: how the Pentagon punished NSA whistleblowers Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 May 2016 14:00:05 GMT)

The Safe House: a documentary on the decline of UK libraries – trailer video
Poet and filmmaker Greta Bellamacina has teamed up with journalist Davina Catt to document the history of British public libraries and their current decline. From their Scottish beginnings in the 18th century right up to present day, Catt and Bellamacina chart the history of UK libraries alongside interviews with the likes of Stephen Fry, Irvine Welsh, Amma Asante and John Cooper Clarke, who plead for libraries to be saved from relentless cutsThe Safe House premieres in London on Monday 23 May Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 May 2016 11:45:12 GMT)

Sandra Ávila Beltran, Mexico's former 'Queen of the Pacific', speaks out – video
Sandra Ávila Beltran has lived, worked and loved inside the upper echelons of the Mexican drug world since the late 1970s. Released last year after serving a seven-year prison sentence – including two years in solitary confinement – Ávila, 56, gave her first interview in nearly a decade. She spoke to the Guardian’s Jonathan Franklin in an exclusive three-hour meeting from her home in Guadalajara Continue reading...
(Mon, 16 May 2016 10:56:20 GMT)

Enough hysteria over the migration crisis. It's time to get rational – video
With wars raging across the globe, argues the Guardian’s migration correspondent, Patrick Kingsley, it is impractical to try and stop people coming to Europe. Our best option is to resettle hundreds of thousands of migrants in EuropeThe New Odyssey: the story of Europe’s refugee crisis by Patrick Kingsley is published by Faber Continue reading...
(Wed, 18 May 2016 06:00:21 GMT)

Miss Chubby pageant defies stigmas faced by overweight women – video
Romina Verna is a contestant in Paraguay’s Miss Chubby pageant. As she prepares to take the stage, Verna talks about what the pageant means to her and her ambition to “be a positive influence on all women”. There is widespread discrimination against overweight people in Paraguay, where 60% of the population is considered overweight or obese. Other participants talk about taking part in a competition designed to end the stigma around being fat in a culture where you are only accepted in society if you are thin or on a diet ‘Not your typical pageant’: Miss Chubby contest embraces plus-size beauty Continue reading...
(Fri, 20 May 2016 10:50:11 GMT)

José Mourinho: how would the Special One fare at Manchester United? – video
The Guardian correspondent Dominic Fifield and football writer Jonathan Wilson consider how a newly appointed José Mourinho would settle in as manager at Manchester United. Following United’s FA Cup final win over Crystal Palace, it was revealed that the club plan to replace Louis van Gaal as managerJosé Mourinho set to be appointed Manchester United manager Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 May 2016 20:11:30 GMT)

Why people vote Trump: the death of the American dream – video
Alongside Donald Trump’s nasty rhetoric, the Republicans’ presidential hopeful has been banging on about one huge issue: US firms increasingly moving jobs abroad, and the country’s rising sense of decline. John Harris watches The Donald win the presumptive nomination in Indiana; tells the story of one doomed factory that has become a Trump cause célèbre; and talks to voters who think he’s the only option – as well as the people who think it’s all a conThe Bernie Sanders effect: talking about a revolution in Baltimore – video Continue reading...
(Thu, 12 May 2016 09:21:55 GMT)

Drones are not all bad – but what if Isis starts using them? | Mary Dejevsky
The muted reaction to the death of Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansoor suggests remote killing has lost its shock value – for nowThe leader of the Afghan Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, was killed on Saturday when his car was targeted by a US drone. For western interests generally, it was a significant scalp in a region where American, British and other forces remain active. His death has the potential to change the balance of power in the conflict, which still plagues the country after nearly four decades of outside intervention.For all that, though, the reaction seemed muted. The US secretary of state, John Kerry, justified the strike by saying that Mansoor had posed “a continuing, imminent threat to US personnel”. His death was subsequently confirmed by Afghan officials. Pakistan, on whose territory he had been killed, made a vain complaint about the violation of its sovereignty. And that, pretty much, was that, so far as reporting and reaction were concerned. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:26:41 GMT)

David Cameron’s used-car purchase was an excruciating ​attempt to look normal | Stuart Heritage
Drop the act, prime minister – buying a Nissan Micra looks all too convenient, right down to the £1,495 price tag and your inexplicable failure to haggleShut the doors. Unplug the internet. Up and live in a cave if you have to. For David Cameron has just purchased a secondhand Nissan Micra, and only bad things can happen now. In terms of legitimately awful portents, Cameron’s Micra is up there with the ravens leaving the Tower of London and Boris Johnson deliberately mussing up his hair before a public speaking engagement. Only bad things can happen from now on. We’re doomed.What does Cameron’s Micra mean? There are only two options. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:00:09 GMT)

Children have always used Lego to make weapons – no big deal | David Boyle
As the virtual world increasingly dominates children’s play, Lego is the last game in the real world standing – I can live with a bit of militarisationSomething odd has been happening in the toy business, as a short wander down the aisles at your local Toys R Us will reveal. The first clue is that the place might seem almost empty. The second clue is that the toys seem to be largely absent as well.Yes, there is a smattering of board games, some villages of Sylvanian creatures, and other crafty things to do with wool and paper. But the vast acres of these warehouses seem largely to consist of film and TV tie-ins. If your imagination extends as far as a Star Wars light sabre or a minion from Despicable Me, then the toy manufacturers of the far east can oblige you. Beyond that, well, nothing much. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:19:22 GMT)

The enduring fascination of relics, from Becket’s elbow to Elvis’s Graceland | Lindsey Fitzharris
Holy items – such as the fragment of Becket’s bone returned to England – attract thousands. But ‘secular relics’ carry as much weight for the devotees of science and the artsThis week, a fragment of bone believed to come from the body of Thomas Becket returns to England for the first time in more than 800 years. The relic, which survived the Reformation, will go on a tour through London and Kent before returning to the Basilica of Esztergom in Hungary, where it has resided since the Middle Ages.There are many secular relics around the world that carry as much, if not more significance for their devotees Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:10:02 GMT)

Can the SNP still claim to be doing politics differently? | Libby Brooks
The scandal of Stewart Hosie’s affair and resignation is minor in Westminster terms, but points up the huge changes Nicola Sturgeon’s party is facingReports of “peak SNP” are, like the apocryphal death of Mark Twain, greatly exaggerated. But it is no surprise that those baffled by the overarching success of the Scottish nationalists, doubtful of their progressive credentials, or allergic to pious claims about doing politics differently, are enjoying a moment of not so quiet satisfaction following the resignation of Stewart Hosie as the party’s deputy leader. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:56:42 GMT)

Atheists don’t need faith, any more than we need religion | Julian Baggini
Religion is on the decline in the UK, but any attempt to suggest that non-believers simply have a different kind of faith is misplaced. Our values are rooted in everyday joysReligion is on the decline, with nearly half of us in England and Wales – and more than half in Scotland – saying we have no religion. But is faith also on the wane? Religion and faith are often treated as synonymous. But as an atheist I am frequently told that I must have faith too, since I can no more prove that God does not exist than theists can prove he does.To see if faith is weakening we have to go beneath the apparent mathematical precision of surveys to the vaguer ideas they attempt to quantify. Even religiosity is hard to measure. Around half of us may not be “religious” but other surveys tend to show that a fifth of us at most – probably less – are prepared to call ourselves atheists. The remainder reject organised religion with its hard-to-swallow doctrines and inconvenient rules, but they retain a belief in a spiritual dimension that is more religious than it is secular. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:52:30 GMT)

Children in care need long-term support, not punishment | David Akinsanya
Too often, kids in care are simply contained and criminalised. If a permanent home can’t be found, then having a mentor would make a huge difference to young people’s livesLord Laming’s review for the Prison Reform Trust has found that children in care are six times more likely to be cautioned by police or convicted of a crime than others of the same age. It is a national shame that we allow these young people to fill young offender institutions and prisons after spending so much money “taking care” of them throughout their childhoods.Unlike in your average family home, kids in care are regularly criminalised by those caring for them: police are called out for incidents that happen to many teenagers but especially those who are harbouring pain and hurt from family breakdown, and exposure to violence and abuse. As a result children and teenagers are getting criminal records for throwing plates and smashing up their rooms, and other actions often regarded as domestic by the police called out to help manage such behaviour. But to the child in care, it’s often their first contact with the criminal justice system. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:25:50 GMT)

If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in? | Zoe Williams
We need to rethink our view of jobs and leisure – and quickly, if we are to avoid becoming obsoleteRobin Hanson thinks the robot takeover, when it comes, will be in the form of emulations. In his new book, The Age of Em, the economist explains: you take the best and brightest 200 human beings on the planet, you scan their brains and you get robots that to all intents and purposes are indivisible from the humans on which they are based, except a thousand times faster and better. Related: The Guardian view on artificial intelligence: look out, it’s ahead of you | Editorial Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:00:02 GMT)

Prince Andrew's latest torment is not the only pointer to royals' future
Perhaps when the time comes we should pare down the monarchy to ‘core business’, setting the royal family - and us - freeOh dear, the Duke of York is in trouble again, this time over allegations that he used his contacts book to help facilitate a questionable trade deal in central Asia in the hope of earning a £4m commission to keep him afloat. The deal, which involved a Greek-Swiss infrastructure contract in Kazakhstan, fell through, but the palace failed to prevent publication. That’s not as serious as the Spanish royal family’s corruption problems – now in the courts – nor as terminal as those of earlier dukes of York, as seen in the BBC’s recent Shakespeare history season where, by my count, three end up dead. But it’s bad enough. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:21:07 GMT)

Austerity is far more than just cuts. It’s about privatising everything we own | Aditya Chakrabortty
Desperate for short-term cash, George Osborne is causing long-term damage by selling off Britain’s most prized assets. ‘Everything must go’ is now public policyAlmost everyone who gives the matter serious thought agrees that George Osborne and David Cameron want to reshape Britain. The spending cuts, the upending of the NHS, even this month’s near-miss over the BBC: signs lie everywhere of how this will be a decade, maybe more, of massive change. Yet even now it is little understood just how far Britain might shift – and in which direction.Take austerity, the word that will define this government. Even its most astute critics commit two basic errors. The first is to assume that it boils down to spending cuts and tax rises. The second is to believe that all this is meant to reduce how much the country is borrowing. What such commonplaces do is reduce austerity to a technical, reversible project. Were it really so simple all we would need to do is turn the spending taps back on and wash away all traces of Osbornomics. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 05:00:01 GMT)

Six graduation outfits guaranteed to annoy Edinburgh University | Nell Frizzell
Edinburgh’s advice to female students was to go for ‘sophisticated glamour’, because ‘image is everything’. So, a James Brown sequin cape?There is a very specific charm to standing in the midday sun, holding a tepid glass of white wine, surrounded by people you’ve barely spoken to for the past three years, waiting to be given a rolled-up sheet of A4 by somebody dressed like a wandering Beefeater. And yet, for many, graduation is one of the happiest, proudest days of their life.So it’s such a shame that the University of Edinburgh made the decision to slough a bucket of manure on the whole occasion. I’m talking about the sartorial advice given in the student newspaper, and tweeted by the university. Advice that started “Girls,” for oh how we as grown and educated women like to be referred to as girls. “Girls, this is your time to invest in some sophisticated glamour.” Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:59:40 GMT)

Town halls aren’t to blame for homelessness | Patrick Butler
Although councils are shunting more and more homeless families miles away from home, the reason is a lack of affordable properties nearbyDespite eager anticipation, a commitment to change the law on homelessness failed to materialise in the Queen’s speech last week. This is perhaps surprising, given the chancellor George Osborne’s recent and unexpected recognition that homelessness was “unacceptable”. Even the Treasury, it seems, had sensed that Something Must Be Done.Ministers, however, do not appear to be entirely in agreement on what that something is. It is, of course, always wise not to rush into legislation. The government’s recent history of botched policy – from the much-amended fiasco that is the housing bill, to forced school academisation – are cases in point. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:00:10 GMT)

The death of a friend is always hard to deal with. What if it pops up on your Facebook feed? | Steven Thrasher
There’s no clear etiquette for digital mourning, but it’s something we’re faced with increasingly often. Here’s how I navigate grief in the age of social mediaThe pain of learning that someone I loved has passed on is as painful a feeling as I have ever known. That punch to your heart which makes it surge so hard that you fear it might stop, just as you learn that the heart of that special friend, cousin, or co-worker is never going to pump blood again.But what do you do when you learn this information through social media? How do you react when you’re scrolling through your feed only to discover that death has taken someone you knew or loved? Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:15:10 GMT)

The far right’s narrow defeat in Austria should be a wake-up call for Europe | Owen Jones
The economic frustrations, insecurities and fears that are fuelling the radical right and the new left are set to increase. Social democracy has become a spent political forceEurope’s far right was supposed to be dead and buried, but its coffin has been opened and its proponents stalk the continent once again. This weekend, nearly half the population of Austria voted for a far-right candidate. If it wasn’t for the votes of 31,000 Austrians – out of a 4.64 million-strong electorate – the country’s figurehead would now be Norbert Hofer, a man who wears the blue cornflower, a symbol associated with the Nazis. And here’s a statistic that should terrify anyone who leans to the left: nearly nine out of 10 Austrian manual workers plumped for the far right.Austria is no blip. Not since 1945 have movements of the far right and xenophobic right had such support across the continent. In France, the Front National – a far-right party which has exploited the crisis of French socialism by stealing the left’s economic rhetoric – won the most votes in the first round of regional elections last December. In Germany, polls show the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany creeping up on the beleaguered Social Democrats. Hungary is ruled by an authoritarian rightwing government, and polls show around a fifth of Hungarians support the far right, antisemitic Jobbik party. From Poland to Italy, from Switzerland to Greece, from Sweden to the Netherlands, the radical right is flourishing. It’s not a phenomenon confined to Europe, of course: across the Atlantic, a racist, Muslim-hating “alternative right” is mobilising behind Donald Trump’s presidential bid. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:00:55 GMT)

Schools ministers should explain gaping hole between rhetoric and reality
Education ministers claim to be for flexibility and freedom, but they dictate policy details. And it’s leading to problemsIt has not been the best of times for education ministers. The past few months have been dominated by the fallout from the white paper and a trail of problems and complaints with this year’s statutory tests. It must be tempting to dismiss this overlap of events as no more than a coincidence – after all, it isn’t unusual for departments to have a run of problems once they are in the spotlight. But in this case, it is less bad luck and more evidence of serious cracks beginning to emerge in key areas  of policy.The present ministerial team under Nicky Morgan claim to be devolutionists. They rally around a banner of freeing schools, trusting teachers and schools leading the system. But it is the growing divergence between this rhetoric and the reality that is a major cause of the present crises. While politicians talk about the new freedoms they are giving schools, our teachers are working with a curriculum, assessment and pedagogy that are increasingly directed by ministers’ own priorities and prejudices. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:15:02 GMT)

In the US they even have ‘sub-minimum’ wages for disabled people | Mary O’Hara
Like the UK, the US discriminates against disabled workers in many ways. Everyone, disabled or not, has the right to a genuine job and fair payThe employment of disabled people is currently being paid close attention in the US, even making it into presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton’s speeches on the campaign trail. As in the UK, people with disabilities in the US are less likely to be in work and more likely to live in poverty or be in low-paid or part-time work when they are employed. And, also as in Britain, advocacy groups tenaciously lobby for change, including action from government.One aspect of disability and employment that has come to the fore recently has been the challenges to the ongoing existence of segregated workshops, and the “sub-minimum wage” for disabled people that tends to accompany them. Currently, in the US, with specific authorisation from the federal government under a provision in an old law, some employers can pay disabled people less – sometimes much less – than the national minimum wage. According to the National Council on Disability, an estimated 420,000 disabled workers across America, the vast majority of whom are in sheltered workshops run by non-profit organisations and most of whom have a learning disability, fall under the exemption. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:00:08 GMT)

Together the EU is greater than the sum of its parts | Daina Taimina
When I first visited the EU in 1995, I didn’t really understand it. But once my country, Latvia, joined, its strengths became clear• View all articles in our EU voices seriesGrowing up in Latvia in the 1960s, when it was still a part of the USSR, Big Ben became a symbol for dreams about a different, faraway world. The drawing of the Houses of Parliament on the cover of an English language textbook captured my imagination. If I learned to speak English, someday I could get there. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 08:00:05 GMT)

The Republican party is not dead. Far from it | Trevor Timm
The obituaries that were written in haste when Donald Trump took over were naive. The past few weeks make that abundantly clearReports of the Republican party’s death at the hands of Donald Trump have been greatly exaggerated. The party is just going to concede the presidential election because their voters nominated an unhinged reality television star. Anyone who thinks that clearly hasn’t been paying attention to how the party works. When Trump effectively clinched the nomination, many commentators gleefully wrote fake obituaries for the Republican party, as if one nomination was going to destroy a political party that has been nominating awful people or decades. To be fair, one of the very few redeeming qualities of Trump’s romp through the party this spring was the complete freakout of the Republican establishment. They were rendered completely helpless as Trump tore down their Chosen Ones one after another. But to claim that the party’s members were just going to spontaneously disintegrate after it was over was naive. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:00:10 GMT)

Why British environmentalists should vote for Brexit | Michael Liebreich
From phasing out coal to creating nature reserves, it is the EU which should be taking lectures from the UK, not the other way round The leading lights of the UK environmental movement would have us believe that a win by the Brexit camp on 23 June would be akin to a natural disaster.According to them, it is only our membership of the EU that renders our beaches swimmable, our water drinkable and our air almost breathable. Freed from the noble, ceaseless efforts of the ever-vigilant EU, troglodyte Britain would tear up decades of environmental legislation and return to our 1970s roots as the “dirty man” of Europe. This is complete and utter tosh. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 07:00:03 GMT)

Father of Eleanor de Freitas loses battle for fresh inquest
David de Freitas wanted new investigation into death of 23-year-old who killed herself before facing a false rape claim trialThe father of a woman who killed herself days before she was due in court on suspicion of making a false rape claim has lost his legal battle for a new inquest into her death.David de Freitas wanted the first inquest into the death of 23-year-old Eleanor to be quashed to allow for a new investigation into the Crown Prosecution Service’s decision to prosecute her. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:25:56 GMT)

North Yorkshire council fracking decision a 'declaration of war'
Industry welcomes decision in Kirby Misperton but campaigners vow to fight council’s approvalAnti-fracking campaigners have accused North Yorkshire council of declaring war on people’s rights to clean air and water after it approved the first operation to frack for shale gas in five years. Campaigners opposed to the development outside Kirby Misperton – a village in Ryedale near the North York Moors national park – launched a “people’s declaration” in an attempt to stop the process going ahead. There have also been calls for a judicial review from Friends of the Earth and Frack Free Ryedale, which led the campaign against the application by Third Energy. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:04:21 GMT)

Anti-radicalisation chief says ministers' plans risk creating 'thought police'
Simon Cole, police lead for Prevent programme, says proposals targeting extremists may not be enforceableThe police chief leading the fight to stop people becoming terrorists has said government plans targeting alleged extremists are so flawed they risk creating a “thought police” in Britain.Simon Cole, the police lead for the government’s own Prevent anti-radicalisation programme, said that the plans may not be enforceable and risk making police officers judges of “what people can and can not say”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 09:08:13 GMT)

MoD to investigate claims Saudis used UK cluster bombs in Yemen
Minister says MoD is urgently investigating claims that munitions manufactured in Britain have been usedClaims that UK-manufactured cluster bombs have been used by Saudi forces in Yemen will be urgently investigated, the foreign secretary, Philip Hammond, has said. The use and supply of such weapons is banned under international law but Amnesty International said it found evidence on its most recent visit to the country of a UK-made cluster bomb having been used by Saudi coalition forces. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:58:41 GMT)

Doctor cleared of failing to tell cancer patient her condition was terminal
Medical tribunal finds Dr Mark Bonar gave cancer patient unconventional nutritional treatment when it was dangerousA doctor at the centre of sports doping allegations has been cleared of failing to tell a cancer patient her condition was terminal.Dr Mark Bonar maintained he was fulfilling the woman’s wish to “hold on to as many days as she could in this world” as he administered an unconventional nutritional treatment. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:35:54 GMT)

Telegraph deputy editor and other top staff exit in newsroom cull
String of senior staff cuts follow announcement that publisher is seeking to reduce costsThe Telegraph has started a round of targeted cuts of senior newsroom staff including deputy editor Liz Hunt, feature writer Harry Wallop and foreign chiefs Richard Spencer and Colin Freeman.The cull, which one source referred to as “targeted assassinations” in the newsroom, comes a day after it emerged that the publisher is seeking significant cost savings at its Victoria headquarters. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:15:33 GMT)

Nationwide plans mortgages shake-up to help defend profits
Building society looks at equity release products and ways for parents to help children buy a home but admits fierce competition may dent profitsNationwide Building Society is looking at ways to revolutionise the mortgage market by developing products to let homeowners help their children on to the housing ladder and release value in their properties as they grow old.The UK’s second-largest mortgage lender revealed it was researching new products as it admitted profits will come under pressure in coming months as competition heats up. Even so the mutual’s new chief executive, Joe Garner – who joined from BT earlier this year – said attractive rates could still be offered to the members who own the building society by generating a profit of £1bn-1.5bn a year. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:17:32 GMT)

FCA warns UK banks on using money laundering rules to close accounts
Regulator criticises banks for using rules as excuse to terminate accounts of individuals and businesses they perceive as riskyUK banks have been told by the City regulator that they should not use anti-money laundering rules as an excuse to close accounts for charities, politicians and other clients just because they perceive them as risky.Publishing an assessment of how banks have responded to rules intended to hold them accountable for money laundering offences, the Financial Conduct Authority said: “It is important that banks retain flexibility in setting up appropriate systems and controls to ensure they comply with legislation as well as in making commercial decisions on whether to provide banking facilities that are consistent with their tolerance of risk. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:06:56 GMT)

Birmingham children's services to be run by trust following failures
City council transferring control of department that has been rated inadequate since 2008 Birmingham children’s services department is to be taken out of council control, two years after an inspection found “widespread and serious failures” that left children and young people at risk of harm.The department, which has been rated inadequate since 2008, is to be taken into a voluntary trust, which the council said would put social workers “at its centre”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:58:34 GMT)

Luton Islamic school trust investigated by charities regulator
Inquiry into Rabia Educational Trust follows series of adverse Ofsted findings such as gender segregation of staffThe educational trust behind an independent Islamic school in Luton that has been criticised for segregating staff by gender and treating male and female pupils differently is being investigated by the Charity Commission.The inquiry by the charities regulator into the Rabia Educational Trust comes after a series of adverse judgments by the school standards watchdog, Ofsted, following inspection of Rabia girls’ and boys’ school. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:31:57 GMT)

Pro-Corbyn group Momentum backs remain campaign
Decision may help allay concerns about turnout among young and left-leaning voters in EU referendumMomentum, the grassroots group of Jeremy Corbyn supporters, is to swing behind the campaign to stay in the EU with a month to go before the referendum.In a boost for the remain side, the movement will now mobilise tens of thousands of activists from 120 local groups to campaign for staying in, under an umbrella campaign for leftwingers called Another Europe is Possible. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:30:32 GMT)

Titty's family 'furious' over name change for Swallows and Amazons film
Able seaman Titty Walker to be renamed ‘Tatty’ for BBC Films adaptation of the classic Arthur Ransome children’s novelThe family of the woman who inspired Titty in Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons have hit out at plans to switch the dinghy-loving character’s name to “Tatty” in a new film adaptation.BBC Films announced in 2011 that it was planning a new take on the classic Lake District-set children’s story, with the aim of capturing the imagination of the Harry Potter generation. The first movie in a planned series – Ransome wrote 12 books – will be in cinemas later this year. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 08:55:41 GMT)

Prisons get urgent £10m to tackle suicide and disorder
Justice secretary confirms emergency funds for English and Welsh prisons after spike in suicides and violenceAn extra £10m is to be pumped into English and Welsh prisons to tackle a rising tide of violence and suicides, the justice secretary, Michael Gove, has announced.Gove described the most recent suicide figures – more than 100 in the past 12 months – and increasing number of assaults and disorder in jails as “terrible” and cause for “considerable personal concern”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:12:03 GMT)

Theresa May accuses fire and rescue services of significant failings
Home secretary says lack of diversity and accountability as well as ‘bullying culture’ in parts of country make reform necessaryThe home secretary, Theresa May, has criticised fire and rescue services for being 96% white, 95% male and allowing a “culture of bullying and harassment” in some parts of England and Wales.May said this lack of diversity, the existence of what she described as a toxic and corrosive culture in some parts of the fire and rescue services and a lack of accountability made necessary a programme of reform that was as “radical and ambitious as I have delivered in policing since 2010”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 14:19:09 GMT)

British emigrants lose supreme court EU referendum vote bid
Decision by country’s top court will prevent up to 2 million UK citizens living abroad from voting on 23 JuneBritons who have lived abroad for more than 15 years will not be allowed to vote in the EU referendum, the supreme court has ruled.The highest court in the country upheld earlier rulings of the high court and court of appeal against Harry Shindler and Jacquelyn MacLennan, who were challenging the law. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:33:34 GMT)

Tony Blair: I underestimated Iraq's destabilising forces
Speaking weeks before release of Chilcot report, former PM says his understanding of Middle East now better than during warTony Blair has admitted he profoundly underestimated the forces that were going to be unleashed in Iraq after the war, and says his understanding of the Middle East is much deeper now than at the time of the invasion in 2003. He also revealed the extent to which the mistakes in Iraq had led him to call for a much more evolutionary solution to regime change in the wake of the Arab spring. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:58:55 GMT)

Leytonstone tube attack: man to face trial for attempted murder
Muhaydin Mire admits trying to stab four people but denies attemped murder in attack captured on mobile phone footageA man has admitted trying to stab four people in an unprovoked attack in front of shocked commuters at a London tube station. But Muhaydin Mire, 30, denied trying to murder another man in his fifties during the attack at Leytonstone Underground station on 5 December last year. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:57:59 GMT)

Bank of England governor rejects accusations of bias over EU referendum
Tory MP and Brexit campaigner Jacob Rees-Mogg accuses Carney of becoming ‘politically involved’ during select committee hearingBank of England governor Mark Carney has hit back at critics of Threadneedle Street’s warnings over Brexit, arguing that voters wanted to weigh up the economic risks of a vote to leave the European Union.In heated exchanges at a parliamentary select committee on Tuesday, Carney told MPs the BoE had a responsibility to the British people “who don’t want risks kept from them”. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:49:13 GMT)

No deadline set for final decision on Hinkley nuclear plant
Energy minister tells MPs that no time limit has been set for EDF to make a final investment decision on the much-delayed nuclear plant The UK has set no deadline for the final go-ahead to the much-delayed Hinkley Point C nuclear plant, energy minister Andrea Leadsom told a committee of MPs on Tuesday. The head of the company aiming to build the new reactors, French state-owned EDF, told the same hearing he could not give a date for the decision nor confirm that it would start generating electricity in 2025, as previously pledged. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:26:20 GMT)

Ben Butler trial: partner 'froze' after finding daughter unconscious
Jennie Gray says she did not call for an ambulance for 45 minutes because she feared her partner would be blamedThe mother of a six-year-old girl allegedly murdered by her father has said she did not call for an ambulance for 45 minutes after she found the child dead because she feared her partner would be blamed for the death.Jennie Gray, 36, denied putting the interests of her partner Ben Butler before those of their daughter Ellie, after the prosecutor Ben Fitzgerald put it to her that she was “prepared to say and do almost anything” to protect Butler. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 12:58:04 GMT)

MPs say malaria drug Lariam should only be used by UK troops as 'last resort'
Report says medication, which can have severe psychological side-effects, should be prescribed only under certain conditionsLariam, an anti-malarial drug that can have severe psychological side-effects, should be prescribed to British troops only as a last resort in a very limited number of cases, MPs have said.The risks associated with the drug were deemed to be so great that military personnel threw them away rather than take them, the Commons defence committee heard. Roche, manufacturer of the drug, issues a “prescriber checklist” asking whether the patient has ever suffered neuropsychological conditions. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 10:55:34 GMT)

Tube engineers vote to strike in row linked to night service
RMT calls for resumption of ‘meaningful’ talks in dispute with Tube Lines over pay, staffing and pensionsLondon Underground maintenance and engineering workers have voted to go on strike in a row linked to the new night tube service.In a ballot of members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union, 85% of those who responded backed walkouts, and a bigger majority were in favour of other forms of industrial action. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:35:54 GMT)

George Osborne's new financial year gets off to 'a disappointing start'
ONS reveals government borrowing at £600m more than expected for April with deficit figures for March also revised upThe chancellor, George Osborne, has fallen behind in his deficit-reduction programme just a month into the new financial year, with the government borrowing more than expected in April.The UK government had to borrow £7.2bn last month to plug the gap between spending and earnings, according to the Office for National Statistics. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 11:52:47 GMT)

Clydesdale Bank hit by £450m of new PPI charges
But National Australia Bank, from which Clydesdale was spun out, is covering over £400m of these costsPayment protection insurance (PPI) payouts continue to hang over Clydesdale Bank as it announced a new £450m charge for the mis-selling scandal in its first results as a stock market listed company.Officially known as CYBG since being spun out of National Australia Bank (NAB) earlier this year, the bank is trying to cut costs to bolster its profitability as an independent entity. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 08:37:49 GMT)

Michael Fallon under pressure over fight against Assad and Isis in Syria
Defence secretary faces first Commons examination since 2 December vote to extend airstrikes from Iraq to SyriaThe British defence secretary faces pressure to defend the twin battles to dislodge president Bashar al-Assad and Islamic State in Syria amid signs that UK ministers are looking at a decentralised model that would not guarantee Assad’s departure.On Tuesday, Michael Fallon will make his first formal statement to the House of Commons since MPs voted on 2 December to extend airstrikes from Iraq to Syria. Ministers undertook to give oral statements every quarter on the conduct of the air campaign. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 06:00:02 GMT)

Justin Webb: broadcasters’ pay should 'keep them on the side of the people'
BBC Radio 4 presenter says he understands concern about stars’ pay – but hints he may earn more than David CameronBBC Radio 4 presenter Justin Webb has said that news broadcasters’ salaries should “keep them on the side of the people” – but hinted he may earn more than the prime minister.His comments come in wake of the white paper unveiled by culture secretary John Whittingdale last week, which outlines the future of the BBC. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 05:00:01 GMT)

EgyptAir crash: official dismisses claim that remains suggest blast
Head of Egyptian forensics authority says claim by unnamed official is “completely false” The head of Egypt’s forensics authority has dismissed a suggestion that the small size of the body parts retrieved since an EgyptAir plane crashed last week indicated there had been an explosion on board. All 66 people on board were killed when the Airbus A320 crashed in the Mediterranean early on Thursday while en route from Paris to Cairo, and an international air and naval effort to hunt for the black boxes and other wreckage continues. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 13:12:58 GMT)

Prosecutors suspect mafia of rigging exam for Italian prison guard jobs
Investigation into widespread and organised cheating in test taken by 8,000 people in April centres on the Camorra For almost 8,000 young Italians hungry for work, the exam last month for 400 prison guard jobs was a fiasco. For the mafia, it may have been a great opportunity, prosecutors in Rome have said. They are investigating widespread and organised cheating, after 88 people were caught wearing bracelets or bringing in mobile phones with covers carrying the answers to the test, or with radio transmitters and earpieces thought to have been used to pipe in the answers. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:06:29 GMT)

Daughter of missing publisher calls for international help
Angela Gui says China illegally abducted Gui Minhai from his property in ThailandThe daughter of a Hong Kong bookseller believed to have been abducted last year in Thailand by Chinese security agents has accused China of carrying out “illegal operations” beyond its own borders and urged the international community to confront Beijing over her father’s disappearance.Gui Minhai, a Swedish citizen who ran a publishing house in the former British colony specialising in risque books about China’s political elite, vanished from his beachfront home in the Thai town of Pattaya last October. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 16:00:14 GMT)

Unreliable car emissions tests harming fight against air pollution, expert says
On the road and lab test discrepancies undermining efforts to curb toxic air levels as UN environment assembly admits global response is not up to scratch The growing gulf between laboratory tests and real world air pollution from cars is hampering efforts to cut the toxic air that kills millions of people a year worldwide, a leading expert has warned.The UN admitted on Tuesday that the global response to air pollution is not up to scratch, after it was revealed last week by the World Health Organisation (WHO) that harmful airborne particulates had risen by 8% in cities around the world. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:06:49 GMT)

Colombia launches huge search as two more journalists go missing
Reporters were covering disappearance of Spanish columnistPresident vows to find Salud Hernández-Mora, last seen in lawless zone Two more journalists have gone missing in a lawless region in Colombia where security forces are already carrying out a huge search for a prominent Spanish journalist, according to President Juan Manuel Santos.Santos said on Tuesday that two journalists from the right-leaning network RCN are unaccounted for and now also being sought. The two were part of a group of journalists that had travelled to the volatile Catatumbo region to cover the hunt for Salud Hernández-Mora, a longtime correspondent for Spain’s El Mundo newspaper whose weekly column in Bogotá daily El Tiempo is one of the most read in Colombia. Continue reading...
(Tue, 24 May 2016 15:47:58 GMT)

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