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Regional News of Thursday, 3 November 2011

Source: GNA

Rush in policy formulation the bane of Ghana’s poor education - Prof Flolu

Kumasi, Nov. 3, GNA – Professor James Flolu, Principal of the College of Technology Education, University of Education, Kumasi, has identified rush in policy formulation as a key factor undermining the quality of the country’s education.

Added to this, he said was the lack of flexibility, limited opportunities for adult learning and continuous education as well as “the failure to link all dimensions and tracks of education together.”

He said there was also “the enduring cancer of emotionalism and sentimentalism which continue to characterize educational debates.

“We make decisions today, change them tomorrow, and the issue becomes ding-dong affair because at each point the decisions are not objectively derived and so they lack legitimacy” he noted.

Prof Flolu was speaking on the topic: “Ensuring quality education for our people – The role of stakeholders – parents, teachers and students” at a colloquium held at the Centre for National Culture in Kumasi.

This was part of the maiden Ashanti Regional Policy Fair that highlighted the achievements and giant strides being made by the Government to transform the socio-economic conditions of the people.

Prof Flolu complained about the primary education system, describing it as “very weak” – a development that had led to the inability of many of the Junior High School (JHS) products to read or write well.

He criticized the situation where Senior High School (SHS) students, who did not qualify for admission into tertiary institutions, enrolled for remedial classes in privately-run schools.

"Remedial schools have become a continuation of the SHS and this is telling something about the education system. If parents could afford to pay fees for remedial classes then they could pay extra money, if their wards are given the opportunity to continue in the public system.”

Prof Flolu underlined the need for students to be actively involved in the entire educational enterprise including the curriculum development process.