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General News of Sunday, 15 September 2019

Source: Stephanie Birikorang

UPP recommends the use of technology to address road carnage in Ghana

Kenneth Nana Kwame Asamoah Kenneth Nana Kwame Asamoah

The United Progressive Party (UPP) is calling for a digitised approach to monitor the flow of traffic in the country to reduce indiscipline on the roads.

The scientific approach, when incorporated, according to the party, would among others protect lives and properties as the country positions itself to improve upon the quality of life of the citizenry.

The Chairperson of UPP Mr Kenneth Nana Kwame Asamoah who made the recommendation in an interview recently indicated that it had become necessary to as a matter of urgency implement measures that would mitigate the risk of casualties and wastage of lives across the country.

He bemoaned the high rate of accidents on the roads, saying many of the accidents were preventable.

β€œIt is long overdue for Ghana to have a database system to reduce road carnage. The problem is not only about bad roads but also about the high level of indiscipline and lack of respect for the laws of this nation,” he added.

He was of the view that if measures were put in place to punish road traffic offenders by slapping them with huge fines, accident rates would drastically reduce and the amounts accrued from the accumulation of the fines could be used to promote economic development.

He said the UPP, when voted into power would prioritise the welfare of the public and ensure there was a centralised database system for all drivers in the country where their information including insurance, vehicle number, and monitoring devices would be installed.

This, he said, would make it easy to track persons who flouted traffic regulations and also serve as a deterrent to others.

Mr Asamoah also assured Ghanaians that when voted into power, UPP would in the first six months create 12,000 jobs for drivers who will be assigned to emergency stations we would create at vantage points of major roads across the country to respond to distress calls.

These stations, he said, would have experienced and competent people including fire fighters, police and health practitioners.

Alse, he promised that 1,000 fire fighting trucks, 1000 ambulances, four helicopters and 1000 tow trucks who would be readily available at all times to tackle emergencies.

"We will make provisions for all these and more because we believe that the tax payers not be taken for granted, they must feel the positive impact of the monies they pay as tax," he added.

Mr Asamoah, the National Road Safety Commission had failed in its mandate and called for its closure, saying it was irrelevant since it no longer served the purpose for which it was established.

He was of the view that fighting indiscipline on the roads could not be successful without laying down strict rules and regulations for vehicle insurers to follow since some of such institutions were fraudulent and do not pay compensations to clients at the right time.

"We will ensure insurance companies do not neglect their customers who have been involved in accidents. Those with comprehensive insurance would be given a vehicle by the company to use for at least a month in case their vehicle is damaged as a result of any accident. Drivers who get involved in too many accidents too would be forced to pay more to the insurance companies so that they would be more careful on the roads. It is everybody's responsibility to help curb road crashes," Mr Asamoah added.

So far, a total of 1,430 people died and 8,325 were injured in 7,993 road accidents, across the country from January to August, this year, as against 1,546 deaths and 8,674 injuries in the same period last year.

The accidents involved 4,852 commercial vehicles, 5,627 private and 2,645 motorcycles.

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