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General News of Friday, 28 May 2021

Source: gna.org.gh

Private Members’ Motions on security agencies in Parliament next week

File photo of Parliament in session File photo of Parliament in session

The Parliament of Ghana is readying itself for an investigation into issues involving state security agencies next week.

Prominent among issues are interferences by members of the state security agencies in Ghana’s 2020 elections; and the recruitment practices of the state security agencies between the period of 2013 and 2020.

The House would lay another Private Members’ Motion calling for an investigation into alleged interferences by some members of the security agencies and some vigilante groups before, during and after Presidential and Elections since 1993 resulting in injuries and loss of lives and make consequential recommendations.

Furthermore, the House would also decide on whether to investigate the ethnic, gender and other sectional backgrounds of persons recruited into the security forces since 1993.

These were contained in the Business Statement of the House, for the Second Week Ending, 4th June, 2021, in the Second Meeting of the First Session of the Eighth Parliament, read on the floor of the House, in Osu-Accra, by Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu, the Majority Leader and Minister of Parliamentary Affairs.

A number of MPs filed joint Private Members’ Motion on the security agencies, and the motion are expected to engage the attention of the House next week.

If the House ayes the motion on the interference of members of the state security agencies, the House would thereafter investigate the violence perpetrated against citizens, causing injuries, and leading to the death of Tajudeen Alhassan (39 years), Abdallah Ayaric (18 years), Emmanuel Dompreh(36 years, Samira Zakaria (36 years)Ibrahim Abass (30 years, Rita Otto (15 years) and Fuseini Musah (14 years ) in the 2020 Elections and make consequential recommendations.

The proposed motion on the interference of members of the security agencies is a private member’s motion that stands in the name of Minority Leader and MP for Tamale South Haruna Iddrisu, Minority Chief Whip Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka, Mr Mahama Ayariga, MP for Bawku Central, Mr Suhuyini Alhassan Sayibu, MP for Tamale North, and Mr James Agalga, MP for Builsa North.

The Motion for the House to investigate the recruitment practices of the state security agencies, again stands in the name of Minority Leader Iddrisu, Minority Chief Whip Alhaji Muntaka, and Mr Sayibu and Agalga.

The proposed motion to investigate the ethnic gender, regional and other sectional backgrounds of persons recruited to the security forces since January 1993, stand in the name of Deputy Majority Leader Alexander Kwamena Afenyo Markin, Majority Chief Whip Frank Anooh-Dompreh, Mr Samaul Samuel Atta Akyea, MP for Abuakwa South, and Mr Osei Bonsu Amoah, MP for Akwapim South Constituency.

Other Private Members’ Motions are a motion to pass a law to mainstream and streamlined Corporate Social Responsibility in Ghana to ensure cogent, equitable and sustainable national development; and a motion to amend Article 97(1)(b) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana to enable an incumbent MP to be elected as Speaker of Parliament without having to vacate his or her seat.
The proposed Private Members’ Motion to mainstream and streamline Corporate Social Responsibility has been sponsored by both Members for the Majority and the Minority Sides.

From the Majority Side are Minority Chief Whip Annoh-Dompreh; Mr Yaw Frimpong Addo, MP for Manso Adubia; Dr Kingsley Nyarko, MP for Kwadaso; Mr Vincent Ekow AssafuA, MP for Old Tafo; Mr Paul Aprkeu Twum Barimah, MP for Dormaa East.

From the Minority Side, the sponsors of the motion are Mr Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa, MP for North Tongu; Mr Rockson –Nelson Etse Kwami Dafeamekpor, MP for South Dayi; Mrs Gizeall Tetteh-Agbotui, MP for Awutu Senya West; and Mrs Eklizabeth Ofosu-Adjare, MP for Techiman North.

The Majority Leader and Majority Chief Whip are sponsoring the Private Members’ Motion on the proposed amendment of the 1992 Constitution to enable an incumbent MP to be elected as Speaker of Parliament without vacating his or her seat.

The Majority Leader drew the attention of the House that a number of Private Members’ Motions admitted by the Speaker were similar, and announced that the Leadership of the House was in consultations with members in whose names the motions stood to consolidate them for a more focused debate towards a unanimous and well-structured recommendation for government action.

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