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General News of Thursday, 10 November 2016

Source: 3news.com

Akufo-Addo condemns ‘violence’ by Mahama’s cabinet ministers

2016 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo has descended heavily on President John Mahama for recent cases of violence said be instigated by some of his ministers.

Nana Akufo-Addo particularly mentioned Asutifi South Constituency, where the Minister of Local Government and Rural Development is seeking reelection. “You (Collins Dauda) are contesting a woman, and you’re having to employ guns, harmful weapons and the use of macho men in order to win? It is a shame and a disgrace.

What kind of a man are you then? You are employing all of these shameful tactics, not against a fellow man, but, against a woman. This is a disgrace. When such things happen, it means you have already lost.”

Addressing a gathering at Hwidiem in the Asutifi South Constituency of the Brong Ahafo Region, Nana Akufo-Addo condemned President John Dramani Mahama for not calling his minister to order. “The President is going all over the world talking about Ghana, talking about peace and talking about democracy.

And in his cabinet, around the cabinet table at which he is presiding, are people who instigate violence – purveyors of violence, sitting around his cabinet table. He doesn’t care. He doesn’t have the strength of character to reprimand them, and tell them to stop what they are doing. He is simply looking on unconcerned.

Does this mean he endorses this kind of conduct?” The three-time presidential candidate stressed that no one is above the law, to perpetrate violence on another, alluding to recent hapennings in Odododiodio Constituency involving the Minister of Youth and Sports. “We don’t want any trouble in Ghana.

Those who think that violence, through the use of guns and machetes, is the only path to which they can succeed should have a good rethink, because it will not succeed.” The NPP flagbearer asked the constituents “not [to] allow themselves to be cowed by violence, nor will they allow violent people to superintend over them. No one can be kept away from voting.

Everybody is going to have the chance to cast their vote in this election”. He asked them not to be complacent but to make sure the change they are seeking happens. “We don’t want that. Until the ballots are cast and counted, we should not be complacent. If you want change, you have to go and vote for the change.”