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Opinions of Saturday, 18 December 2004

Columnist: Asiedu, Emmanuel K.

More Need To Be Done

Now that the elections are over, and we now know who our President is, and who our cabinet members are for the next four years, let us come together as one people to tackle the most urgent problems facing our society today.

During my summer vacation visit to Ghana in August 2003, after five years stay outside, I was fascinated by the new changes and developments in the country.

Some of the things that really captivated me more were the governments? effort to reconstruct the Kwame Nkrumah Circle road leading to Nsawam - Kumasi, and the Tema Round-about to Ningo road, and the Tetteh Quashi Roundabout. These are very important initiatives, which would ensure quality and safe travel in the country, which will lead to economic success and deduction of road accidents.

The Tetteh Quashie Round -About which leads to the Akwapim Mountains, and the Accra to Mankessim road leading to Takoradi should also be a major concern to the government.

The Banking system has improved rapidly, with more sophisticated operating systems and more banks joining the fastest money transfer system. However, personnel at Ghana Commercial Bank?s branch at Liberty House Accra should be thought etiquette, and how to respect people and money.

Another sector which also drew my attention was our sanitary problem. The Vice-President?s initiative to lead the nation to deal with this crucial issue is a good step in the right direction, however, the government need to do more to ensure this initiative yields fruits and not only statements.

On Monday the 25th of August, I decided to go to Kojo Thompson Road Adabraka on a special assignment. I got down at the intersection linking the National Theater and the Cedi House and decided to trek to my destination. I was thirsty so I bought pure water from a vendor. After finishing drinking, I looked around for a trash bin to throw the empty sachet but couldn?t find one. I walked all the way from Cedi house to my destination on Kojo Thomson Road without finding a single trash bin to throw the empty sachet away.

Back at home that evening, I query my brothers and I was told the government had commissioned a minister for the beautification of Accra city. My dear minister if you are reading, this is food for thought. There are hundreds if not thousands or perhaps millions of Ghanaians like myself, who would like to see their capital city in the same standard as other major international cities so please get on your heels and get the job done or simply step down, gone are the days of mediocrity.

Another sector, that also caught my attention, was relationship between commuter transport drivers, their mates and passengers. I observed that most drivers? mates are very rude to passengers, and I also observed that some passengers are impolite towards drivers and or their mates therefore revoking angry responses usually from the drivers? mates. Although I learnt there is a section of the drivers union which oversees these problems, I think it should be taking seriously to avoid serious consequence, as I witnessed on a commuter transport I was traveling in to Nsawam, a passenger said something which got the driver angry, all persuasions and pleas to calm the driver down failed, eventually he had to turn around from the middle of the journey to bring us back to the station, adamantly.

Last but not the least is the dust problem. I noticed that lots of communities-example parts of Lapas, Madina Estate and others have already finished building their houses up to the city planner?s approval, but alleys and divided roads are left dusty making the otherwise beautiful buildings ugly and also causing dust related illnesses. I suggest if the government could put into place a plan and an advising team to ensure those communities get a government subsidy to help deal with these problems.

Apart from these observations of mine, I think my country Ghana is the most beautiful place on earth, and the most peaceful place to live, but that will be internationally recognized if and only if some of the things I have mentioned are dealt with.


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