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Opinions of Thursday, 26 July 2018

Columnist: Mohammed Abdul Hanan EL-Saeed

Ghanaians must be careful not to push the police to become timid

It is okay for the Ghanaian people to criticize or critique the Police for their shortcomings and frailties. After all, the police are humans and are not infallible. They can make mistakes just like any other human institution. Instead of showing how angry they are right now, the public should help the police to navigate itself safely through the difficult challenges it is confronted with currently.

The Ghanaian people as a matter of civil responsibility, must try as much as possible to avoid whilst in their quest to put the police in check, not to force/push the police to become timid in the performance of their duties or even exhibit a shred of fear in their approach towards criminal gangs.

Also, the Ghanaian people must eschew actions thar have the tendency push the police to become apprehensive in confronting people who break the law, afraid to wear their uniforms in public places and or to succumb to unnecessary psychological pressures from people with deliberate malicious intents using social media to pressurize the police to give up on their constitutional duties.

In addition, the public must ensure that their aversion to criticize or critique the Police (rightly or wrongly) to get them to be amongst the most respected or best police institutions in the world, should not be one that is geared towards frightening the police to become timid.

Without doubt, the Ghanaian people have every right constitutionally and morally to demand excellence, good behavior, professionalism, and good service from the police, but in doing so, they must be exercise extreme caution so that they do not end up pushing the police to coil into their shelves.

In recent times, especially following the unfortunate incident at Midland Savings and Loans, some members of the public have taken undue advantage of that unfortunate incident to mock/tease the police, call them names or invite them to come and beat them so that they can get favors from benevolent Ghanaians in the same way as the woman who was assaulted in the Midland case. This is an unfortunate development and has to cease as soon as possible.

The name calling, castigation, plain insults and innuendo I must add, are reaching a crescendo and must cease as early as practicable so that some ill-mannered or hot-tempered young police officers don't feel obliged to get over excited and react to such harassment in town.

It is hoped that just as the Police Administration is advising its men and women to at all times exhibit professionalism in the discharge of their duties, it is absolutely necessary that it advises the public, in the same manner, to desist from unnecessarily pushing the police to the corner.

It is sad that we have gotten to this point where even foreigners have found it convenient to tease the Ghanaian Police Officer in broad daylight and get support from fellow Ghanaians.

Let's watch it!

Mohammed Abdul Hanan EL-Saeed