You are here: HomeWallOpinionsArticles2018 01 29Article 621535

Opinions of Monday, 29 January 2018

Columnist: K. Badu

Exposed! NDC prefers despotism to majoritarianism

It is manifestly true that the surreptitious agreement was never in Ghana’s interest. The U. S. government indeed pulled a fast one on Mahama’s government. Ghana, so to speak, received a raw deal.

Paradoxically, we hear that the U. S. government has washed its hands off the two Guantanamo suspects. According to the agreement, the U. S. government would have nothing to do with the Yemeni suspects after the agreed two years. Ghanaians now have the sole responsibility of catering for the suspects we never dreamt of detaining in the first place. How bizarre?

I had an opportunity to listen to the news file programme on Joy FM on Saturday 27th January 2018, in which the ace journalist, Kwaku Baako, sensationally revealed that in 2014, the Interior Ministry wrote a series of concerned missives to the Mahama’s government to advise against the ostensive dangers in accepting the two Guantanamo suspects from the United States of America.

According to the ace journalist Kwaku Baako, the then Deputy Interior Minister, James Agalga , wrote to the Mahama’s government on behalf of the substantive minister: “The Ministry of Interior appreciates the move by the United States of America government to resettle the Guantanamo detainees in a third country, but I humbly proposed that Ghana is currently not in position to receive the detainees in view of the crucial economic situation that Ghana finds itself in.

“Besides, the resettlement of the detainees will have political as well as security implication for Ghana.”

But despite the prior concerns raised by the Interior Ministry, the Mahama’s government uncharacteristically scoffed at the seemingly poignant advice, disregarded Ghana’s security, self-interest and survival, and, obsequiously acquiesced with the apparent nebulous agreement.

Shockingly, however, the Mahama’s government woefully failed to build consensus with the people of Ghana. Indeed, the NDC government autocratically entered into the agreement with U. S. government without the input of the Parliament of Ghana.

It thus came as no surprise when two patriots took the case to the Supreme Court. To the delight of the litigants and the vast majority of Ghanaians, the Supreme Court condemned the unconstitutionality of the surreptitious agreement between NDC government and the U. S. government.

The Supreme Court rightly upbraided Mahama’s government for trampling upon the Constitution of Ghana by blatantly failing to send the agreement to the Parliament of Ghana for ratification.

Ironically, in spite of the Supreme Court’s ruling that the agreement was unconstitutional and sought the government to either ratify the agreement at the Parliament of Ghana or send the two Guantanamo suspects back, the outgone NDC government clandestinely conferred refugee status on the two Yemenis in July 2016 at the blind side of the parliamentarians.

It was, indeed, undemocratic and must be condemned with no uncertain terms. Well, take my word for it, dearest reader, such an abhorrent behaviour can only be likened to an autocratic leadership.

The fact however is, the outgone NDC government shouldn’t have offered to cumbrously carry the U. S. government’s heavy-laden luggage. Ghana indeed has a fragile neck in comparison with the United States of America.

It is, therefore, puzzling that in spite of their dreadful errors in decision-making, the NDC strident communicators are stubbornly refusing to shoulder the blame and rather trying their level best to shift their unpardonable infelicities onto the problem solver (NPP government).

Never again must we, who have the honour and privilege to protect and defend our sovereignty, behave in such a listless and servile manner.