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Opinions of Friday, 23 December 2016

Columnist: Adwoa Kyerewaa Darko

Chicken no longer relevant at Christmas

Christmas today is no longer looked on with as much excitement as it used to be some time ago. In times past the thought of chicken being a major part of meals made many especially, children eager to celebrate christmas. Today with the influx of many fancy restaurants and fast food joints chicken has now become a common part of an everyday meal. Almost all local food joints sell chicken on daily basis and so one does not necessarily have to wait for Christmas to eat chicken.

For most people Christmas is no longer about chicken, fancy food or that Christmas attire because these are things they tend to have on normal days regardless of whether it’s Christmas or not.

Low patronage of live chicken

In the past many hencoops with live chicken could be spotted at vantage points to attract buyers however the situation is completely different this year.

The only bird seller spotted during The Mirror’s visit to parts of Accra, Kojo Asante bemoaned the slow pace of sales this season.

“This year, the general election out shadowed the Christmas but two weeks after the elections, nothing has changed.” Mr Asante said.

Christmas back in the days

In an interview with Mr Kwame Danso, a retired teacher, to find out how Christmas was celebrated in the past, he recounted that Christmas was about family.

‘‘I remember my father would always host other extended family members in our house. Families we have not seen for a long time would all come together to cook, eat, share jokes and various experiences. It was during such times we would discover some cousins or relatives we had no idea existed’’ he narrated.

In another interview, Mr Enoch Wiafe an Evangelist, told The Mirror that he did not have the privilege of receiving gifts during Christmas because of his modest background.

He said although they reared fowls, goats and other animals, they never used any for meat on normal days except Christmas.

‘‘I never understood why and got very upset about that so I asked him and said he needed to sell them together with other farm produce to make enough money to finance our education so if we wanted to ‘‘eat up’’ our education that was up to us’’ he recounted.

Christmas now

According to Nhyira Mills, a third year student at the University of Ghana, Christmas is usually spent with her friends going out to events or other social gatherings.

She said her home has never been one that sits around the table to eat or talk and Christmas is no different.

‘‘I live with only my father and he barely has time so during Christmas I either