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Ed Miliband: Labour faces a fight to save its Scottish MPs
Labour party leader reacts after poll suggests Scottish National party could win up to 54 Scottish seats in 2015 electionEd Miliband has admitted that his party must fight for every hour and every day to hold on to its Scottish MPs after a shock poll predicted Labour could be wiped out by the Scottish National party next year.The dramatic poll for STV said the SNP could win up to 54 Scottish seats and said Labours popularity was its lowest level since 2007, only a month after Labour had spearheaded a victorious referendum campaign against independence. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:00:05 GMT)

Re-written letter adds to questions over child abuse inquiry head
Fiona Woolf re-wrote letter to Theresa May seven times playing down links to Lord Brittan, who is at centre of cover up claimsThe head of the governments inquiry into historic child sexual abuse allegations repeatedly re-wrote a letter to Theresa May, the home secretary, to play down her links with former home secretary Lord Brittan, it has emerged.Fiona Woolf has faced calls to resign over her close personal relationship with Brittan, who was in charge of the Home Office in the 1980s when it is alleged there was a coverup at the department of sexual abuse. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:39:05 GMT)

Foreign jihadists flocking to Iraq and Syria on 'unprecedented scale'  UN
UN report suggests decline of al-Qaida has yielded an explosion of jihadist enthusiasm for its even mightier successor organisations, chiefly IsisThe United Nations has warned that foreign jihadists are swarming into the twin conflicts in Iraq and Syria on an unprecedented scale and from countries that had not previously contributed combatants to global terrorism.A report by the UN security council, obtained by the Guardian, finds that 15,000 people have travelled to Syria and Iraq to fight alongside the Islamic State (Isis) and similar extremist groups. They come from more than 80 countries, the report states, including a tail of countries that have not previously faced challenges relating to al-Qaida. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:13:49 GMT)

Put calorie labels on beer, wine and spirits, say public health experts
Alcoholic drinks are fuelling obesity epidemic and most have no idea how many calories their drinks containBeer, wine and spirits are fuelling the obesity epidemic and should be labelled with the calories they contain, say public health experts.A large 175ml glass of 13% ABV (alcohol by volume) wine contains 160 calories, a bottle of alcopop contains 170 and a pint of 4% ABV beer contains 180. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 05:59:04 GMT)

David Cameron accused of getting sums wrong on spending cuts claims
Thinktank claims that not even half of the austerity measures mentioned by the prime minister would be implemented by 2015David Cameron has been accused of getting his sums wrong, after appearing to suggest the government had already made most of its proposed spending cuts.The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) said not even half of the austerity measures would be implemented by 2015. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 23:35:33 GMT)

Explosion at Stafford fireworks factory leaves four injured and one missing
Eight fire engines fight blaze while police plan to search scene once flames are out and area made safeOne person is missing and at least four others have been injured after an explosion at a fireworks factory. Residents described hearing a loud bang, before a huge fire ripped through the warehouse in Stafford on Thursday night.Police said two men suffering from serious burns and smoke inhalation were taken to hospital, while two women were treated by paramedics at the scene. A spokeswoman said a fifth person is unaccounted for. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:35:43 GMT)

Education study finds in favour of traditional teaching styles
Report from Sutton Trust and Durham University says way that pupils learn remains a mysterious subjectSchools need to put more effort into evaluating what makes effective teaching, and ensure that discredited practices are rooted out from classrooms, according to a new study published by the Sutton Trust and Durham University.The study suggests that some schools and teachers continue using methods that cause little or no improvement in student progress, and instead rely on anecdotal evidence to back fashionable techniques such as discovery learning, where pupils are meant to uncover key ideas for themselves, or learning styles, which claims children can be divided into those who learn best through sight, sound or movement. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:00:05 GMT)

DfID not doing enough to protect poor from corruption, says aid watchdog
Independent Commission for Aid Impact says women bearing brunt of corruption as department gets second-worst ratingThe UKs Department for International Development (DfID) is failing to address the petty but widespread corruption that blights the daily lives of the worlds poorest people and has a particularly corrosive impact on women and girls, Britains aid watchdog has warned.In a report published on Friday, the Independent Commission for Aid Impact (Icai) acknowledges the departments awareness that everyday corruption is a critical challenge for development, but says it has neither developed an approach equal to the challenge, nor focused its efforts sufficiently on the poor. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:01:08 GMT)

Tony Blair warns curbing immigration would be disaster for Britain
Former prime minister tells Ed Miliband chasing Ukip support would take UK backwards economically and politicallyTony Blair has intervened in the increasingly fractious debate on how to counter Ukips appeal over immigration by saying any attempt by Labour to chase its policies would only validate the argument of Ukips leaders.He said ending immigration would be a disaster for the country, and urged the Labour party to show greater clarity. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:59:00 GMT)

Fighting Ebola in Sierra Leone: The world is not safe
Sparsely-equipped hospitals and beleaguered staff battle a disease whose victims outpace the number of beds being builtAll over Freetown, buildings, vehicles and people are being commandeered in the fight against Ebola. In the suburb of Wilberforce, in an old building for the telecommunications company Airtel, a dozen students loiter on a wall waiting to relieve staff from the trauma at the Ebola hotline they are manning.Outside, the din of ambulances would not be noteworthy until the driver and passenger appear in regulation yellow overalls, mask, goggles, hood and visor. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:17:56 GMT)

China upholds death penalty for three who led mass stabbing in Kunming
Intermediate court rejects appeals by terrorists convicted over railway station incident in which 31 people were killedA Chinese appeal court has upheld death sentences for three people convicted over a mass stabbing this year in which 31 people were killed, say state media.The higher peoples court of Yunnan province rejected Hasayn Muhammads appeal and upheld the penalty meted out by the Kunming municipal intermediate peoples court last month, Xinhua said in a dispatch from Kunming. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:06:52 GMT)

MH370 passenger's family sue Malaysia Airlines and government
Lawyers claim negligence in disappearance of Jee Jing Hang, one of 239 people on board plane when it vanished A Malaysian family is suing the countrys government and Malaysia Airlines for negligence in the disappearance of flight MH370.The suit was filed by lawyers on behalf of the two young sons of Jee Jing Hang, who was on board the plane when it disappeared on 8 March with 239 people on board. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 05:54:00 GMT)

Bank of Japan expands monetary stimulus, sending shares soaring and yen tumbling - business live
Nikkei hits seven-year high, and yen hits seven-year low, as Japans central bank stuns markets by extending its monetary stimulus programme.Bank of Japan expands monetary stimulus <- new readers start hereComing up, eurozone unemployment and inflation data at 10am 8.08am GMT The London stock market has opened, and shares are surging as investors welcome the news that Japans central bank has boosted its stimulus plan.The FTSE 100 jumped 85 points at the open, with almost every share gaining ground. Thats a 1.2% gain, to 6549 points. 8.02am GMT The Bank of Japan has also halved its growth forecasts for this financial year.It now expects growth of just 0.5% in the year to March, down from 1.0% three months ago. 7.58am GMT The BoJ got the timing of todays surprise stimulus boost just right, reckons Eric Burroughs of Reuters, as the markets were adjusting to the end of Americas QE programme.Pretty cheeky of Kuroda, yet again playing on lack of/low expectations and timing it with shift at Fed for maximum impact 7.48am GMT FTSE 100 forecast to start +70 at 6534 after Bank of Japan surprise move. 7.48am GMT Another morning, another profit warning from a UK retailer.As widely reported by other retailers in the apparel sector, after a strong start to the quarter, September and October have both seen an exceptional period of warm weather across the UK and the rest of Europe which is expected to continue into November. 7.39am GMT In other news... Royal Bank of Scotland has just become the latest bank to make provisions for a fine over the foreign exchange-fixing scandal.RBS latest bank to make provision for forex: £400m. And more for PPI: £100m"Some of the bills are already in the post" says RBS boss Ross McEwan in reference to up-coming fines 7.32am GMT More reaction to the BoJs move:Aggressive move by the BOJ this morning. Perhaps policymakers are reconsidering implementing the second half of the scheduled sales tax.BoJ, Fed, BoE all done several rounds of QE. The ECB will follow, even if they don't want to. The big boys have probably already decided it. 7.30am GMT 7.18am GMT Financial experts are scrambling to react to the surprise news that Japan will launch a more aggressive stimulus programme.Junko Nishioka, chief economist at RBS Securities Japan, says (via Reuters):It was a total surprise that the BOJ eased further at this time given that BOJ executives have not voiced such pessimistic views lately. The move was apparently made in response to underlying weakness in prices. Governor Kuroda couldnt be bullish anymore -- inflation has slowed to 1 percent and oil prices are going to weigh on prices, Kuroda also thought about Abes decision on the sales tax. He really didnt want Abe to postpone it.More BOJ QE has whiff of panic. Yen down, of course, but more widely the contrast with QE-ending Fed is sending $ up across the board.Two days after the Fed stops easing, Bank of Japan boosts monetary stimulus. #QE4EVA.Asia stocks surged overnight and the resultant rally is likely to filter through to European markets this morning as investors cheer a further bout of monetary largesse, as the stimulus jamboree continues. 7.07am GMT There was euphoria on trading floors across Tokyo after the Bank of Japan announced it will extend its stimulus programme: 7.00am GMT The new Japanese stimulus plan has send the yen tumbling to a seven-year low.It slumped to as low as 111.22 yen to the US dollar, the weakest level since 2007.Yen hits 110 against the dollar, its weakest level since 2008: pic.twitter.com/VY5gNF6Dgc 6.54am GMT Good morning.Big news from Tokyo - the Bank of Japan has bowed to pressure and extended its stimulus programme in a renewed bid to stave off deflation, stunning the markets.Japans economy has continued to recover moderately as a trend and is expected to continue growing at a pace above its potential. However, on the price front, somewhat weak developments in demand following the consumption tax hike and a substantial decline in crude oil prices have been exerting downward pressure recently.If the current downward pressure on prices remains, there is a risk that conversion of deflationary mindset, which has so far been progressing steadily, will be delayed.Impressed that Kuroda is willing to push through more easing with just a 5-4 majority. Thats how you do it. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:08:13 GMT)

Nato frontline in life-or-death war on cyber-terrorists
From attackers trying to bring down planes to criminals targeting banks, the danger is growingIts been a busy week in the skies above Europes periphery, as Nato has repeatedly scrambled jets to track unusual sorties by Russian bombers.However lively the aerial game of cat and mouse has been, it is nothing compared to the digital skirmishing that goes on in and around the servers and systems that sustain the western alliance. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 23:52:07 GMT)

Aung San Suu Kyi meets with Burma's president in milestone talks
Former military commander Thein Sein greets political rival as Barack Obama, soon to visit, calls for fair election in 2015Burmas president, Thein Sein, has opened unprecedented talks with Aung San Suu Kyi and other political rivals as Barack Obama called for inclusive and credible elections in the country in 2015.Thein Sein and Aung San Suu Kyi walked into the meeting together on Thursday to begin talks that are the first of their kind as Burma emerges from decades of outright military rule. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 05:09:06 GMT)

French investigate drones spotted over nuclear plants
Greenpeace denies involvement in pilotless flight activity over state-owned DF plants and expresses concernFrench authorities have launched an investigation into unidentified drones that have been spotted over nuclear plants operated by state-owned utility EDF, its interior minister said on Thursday.Seven nuclear plants across the country were flown over by drones between 5 October and 20 October. An EDF spokeswoman said they had no impact on the plants safety or functioning. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:39:07 GMT)

Russian gas set to flow to Ukraine again after new supply deal agreed
EU steps in as guarantor for Kiev in three-way agreement, with sanctions against Russia in place as Ukraine conflict continuesUkraine, Russia and the European Union signed a deal on Thursday on the resumption of Russian natural gas supplies to Ukraine for winter after several months of delay during the conflict in Ukraine.European commission president José Manuel Barroso, who witnessed the three-way signing ceremony in Brussels as he prepares to leave office on Friday, said: There is now no reason for people in Europe to stay cold this winter. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 23:10:30 GMT)

Violent clashes in Burkina Faso over plans to extend presidents rule
At least three people reported dead in fighting, while Blaise Compaoré backtracks and says he will stand down Burkina Fasos revolution 2.0The iron grip of one of Africas longest serving rulers was weakening on Thursday as tens of thousands of protesters clashed with security forces outside the presidential palace in Burkina Faso, demanding that Blaise Compaoré step down.Compaoré, who has led the west African nation for 27 years, declared a state of emergency after protesters stormed parliament and torched other state buildings. At least three protesters were shot dead and scores were wounded by security forces, emergency services said, as the crowds forced Compaoré to dissolve the government and pledge talks with the opposition. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:35:06 GMT)

Ex-archbishop of York quits church position over report into alleged abuse
Lord Hope steps down from role following finding of systemic failures by the Church of England over child abuse allegationsA former archbishop of York has resigned from his position as an honorary assistant bishop after a report into into allegations of child abuse by a former cathedral dean found systemic failures by the Church of England.Last weeks report by Judge Sally Cahill QC said Lord Hope of Thornes failed to follow policy and take advice after he was informed of complaints against Robert Waddington relating to boys in Manchester and Australia. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:19:24 GMT)

Israel closes Al-Aqsa mosque compound to all visitors
Closure of Temple Mount site denounced by Mahmoud Abbas as tantamount to a declaration of warIsrael on Thursday ordered the first full closure of the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalems Old City in 14 years, in a move denounced by Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas as tantamount to a declaration of war.The closure of the religious site, venerated by both Muslims and Jews, came after anti-terrorist police shot dead a 32-year-old Palestinian man on Thursday morning who was suspected of having tried to kill a far-right Jewish activist the night before. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:15:38 GMT)

Libyas highest spiritual leader banned from UK over support of Islamists
Sheikh Sadik Al-Ghariani used website based in Devon to celebrate violent capture of Tripoli by militia force Libya DawnLibyas highest spiritual leader, the grand mufti Sheikh Sadik Al-Ghariani, has been banned from entering the UK after it emerged he had been helping direct the Islamist-led takeover of Tripoli from England.Ghariani fled the UK in August after the Guardian revealed that he was broadcasting to militants in Libya using an internet television station owned by a relative in Devon. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:58:57 GMT)

Renters will outnumber homeowners in 104 parliamentary seats by 2021
Campaign group Generation Rent says MPs will have to adapt their priorities to renters needsRenters will outnumber homeowners in 104 of the UKs 650 parliamentary constituencies by the year 2021, according to research from the campaign group Generation Rent. This will mean a large increase in the political power wielded by those who rent their homes.The number of MPs with a majority of constituents who rent their homes has risen from 38 in 2001 (6% of MPs) to 65 in 2011 (10% of MPs). The report calculates that if this trend continues and house prices remain unaffordable to many people then renters will outnumber homeowners in 16% of constituencies by 2021. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:05:42 GMT)

US and Australia lift Fiji sanctions
Thawing of diplomatic relations follows democratic elections in September that brought coup era to an endThe US and Australia have removed sanctions against Fiji following democratic elections.Australias foreign minister, Julie Bishop, on Friday began a two-day visit to Fiji, describing it as the start of a new era in the relationship between the two countries. She announced that Australia had lifted all remaining sanctions, including on weapons sales. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 03:29:16 GMT)

Policy guide for civil servants to boost family life in the UK
Guidelines set out five questions that all civil servants need to consider before they go ahead with a policy changeCivil servants are to be required for the first time to check their policies to ensure they will promote family life in the UK.The initiative is the brainchild of the work and pensions secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, who is in charge of family policy. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:00:05 GMT)

Sunny summer of sport takes toll on UK cinemas
Unexciting films are to blame, says Variety critic, as showreel of major releases is produced to try to boost takingsThis may have been a summer filled with sunshine, sport and an excess of strawberries, but one industry has not been basking in the unseasonably warm glow.The World Cup, Commonwealth Games and high temperatures have taken their toll on UK cinemas this year, who have faced a decline of almost 8% in admissions on 2013. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:57:35 GMT)

From Network to Nightcrawler: why has Hollywood got it in for TV news?
Jake Gyllenhaals accident-chasing cameraman is a direct descendant of characters in classics such as Network, Broadcast News and even Anchorman. Steve Rose scans cinema history for a small-screen newshound who isnt an amoral egomaniac Interview: Jake Gyllenhaal on NightcrawlerHere are the headlines: the TV industry is solely concerned with ratings; it puts garish entertainment over principled journalism; corporate interests trump public interest; and news networks are largely populated by vain airheads, borderline sociopaths and ambitious screw-ups with no lives outside their careers usually women. At least thats what its like according to the movies. The dynamics of TV news have made for some of the best cinema of the past 50 years, but when it comes to being fair and balanced, you start to wonder.The latest recruit to this shady industry is Jake Gyllenhaal in Dan Gilroys bracing new satire Nightcrawler. Armed with a camcorder, a police radio and a head full of secondhand business tips, he cruises the Los Angeles night like a vampire, feeding off the blood of murder and car-crash victims, all the better to rejuvenate the career of his producer Nina Romina, played by Rene Russo. Russos dream footage is a screaming woman, running down the street with her throat cut, she says, and Gyllenhaal goes the extra distance to get it for her. Its a match made in TV hell. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:00:12 GMT)

24 Hours in A&E review a measured, moving series that doesnt mess with the formula
This emergency department show is wonderful, allowing stories to unfurl naturally and letting people even stroppy madams keep their dignityTwenty-four hours, seven days a week, says the receptionist, before putting the phone down and turning to her colleague. I love that question, Whens your opening hours?So begins the seventh series of 24 Hours in A&E (Channel 4). The scenery has changed, slightly we are now in St Georges emergency department in south-west London rather than Kings College hospital in the south-east but the makers have, refreshingly, had the confidence not to fix something that isnt broken, so the format remains the same. Tales of two major events in this episode, a motorbike rider who has been brought in after a crash with half her leg amputated at the scene and a boy with learning difficulties and severe epilepsy admitted after a massive fit are interspersed with staff talking about their work, and relatives talking about their injured loved ones, while the hospital drama is leavened with scenes of the treatment of someones more minor injury. This week, the latter came courtesy of the marvellously stroppy and ungrateful little madam Tina, who had a sewing needle stuck in her foot and whose mother was on the other end of the phone telling her that she would probably die from an infection if the doctors who would want to hack her to pieces to get it out didnt kill her first. Afterwards, the saintly registrar who deals with her, Mo Tahir, just grins and shrugs. Mothers, he says. They always have the edge on you. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:00:07 GMT)

Halloween: the science of cashing in
Halloween is increasingly popular, so you can expect to see countless articles, adverts, TV shows, product offers and more all themed around it, even if the association is extremely tenuous. Why does this happen? And isnt this article just another blatant example of it? Yes, yes it is.Its Halloween again. It feels like its only been a year since this blog last clumsily tried to combine science and Halloween in a desperate bid to gain extra traffic from the fleeting society-wide interest in commercially-acceptable occult. Fat chance of that, by the way; given the onslaught of all-things Halloween, youre just adding to the noise. Its like sneezing into a hurricane and hoping someone says bless you. Where does all this come from though? Halloween is confusing enough as it is when you think about it logically. Its nominally meant to be scary, but its also strongly emphasised as being child-friendly. Thanks to Halloween it is now perfectly acceptable to dress small children as a vampire or a devil, a reanimated corpse that sustains itself by feasting on the blood of unwilling victims, and the biblical manifestation of all that is evil and responsible for the suffering of mankind (respectively). You wouldnt normally get away with that sort of thing. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 23:04:14 GMT)

Monstrous Science: How the Yeti gets research funded
Struggling to find research funding? Have you considered adding a Yeti hunt to your grant application? Read on to see how it has worked for some scientists, as well as having a rather surprising connection to superspy James Bond and some missing plutoniumThe 1960-61 Silver Hut expedition was an extraordinarily ambitious physiology research programme, which provided significant insights into human adaptation to altitude, and kick-started the careers of some of the twentieth centurys leading physiologists. It was also expensive, and part of the funding came from a promise by mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary to organise a hunt for the Yeti.Silver Hut was dreamt up by Hillary and the physiologist Griff Pugh the man responsible for much of the research that allowed Hillary to climb Everest in 1953. Inspired by time spent in the Antarctic as part of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition , Pugh suggested that a team of explorer-scientists could go to the Himalaya and overwinter in specially designed huts, in order to study the long-term effects of adaptation to high altitude. By promising a Yeti hunt, and an attempt on one of the nearby high peaks, the team managed to get funding from a publishing company, Marshall Field Enterprises of Chicago....all one had to do on coming face to face with a Yeti was to estimate the body weight of the creature, carry out a small mental calculation, enabling one to set the correct amount of drug so as not to kill the beast, load the gun and fireIn any event I found myself quite unable to do the mental sum required and on the one occasion when I did manage it, took a full six minutes Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:00:08 GMT)

I dont want my kid to end up on the scrapheap. So I send her private
Middle-class parents who choose state schools for their kids shouldnt be so smug. It does little for equalityToday thousands of parents seeking a secondary-school place for their children will be having a final mini-panic. The fiercely competitive application process for admissions is at an end, along with the seemingly endless school open-day trips and the scrutiny of Ofsted reports and league tables. Theyll have to wait until March to find out whether their child is to be offered a place at their first preference.Among them will be middle-class liberal-progressive types who could afford private education but choose to send their kids to state schools as a sign of solidarity with those of less privileged backgrounds. In their eyes, theyre doing their bit to address Britains huge and growing inequality gap. But what impact does this really have on equality? Do children from rich, middling and poor backgrounds all enjoy similar life chances by attending the same state school? Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:52:48 GMT)

Has Amelia Earhart's plane finally been found? Not so fast
A small group of wreckage hunters purports to have found a bit of Earharts Lockheed Electra aircraft. Its a good story, but critics of the find are more vocal than everA metal sheet, some small bones and an ointment pot may be the final artifacts of Amelia Earharts failed 1937 journey around the world, if a small group of wreckage hunters is to be believed. They could also be the remains of some other plane, a turtle and trash. But the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (Tighar), which first found the warped bit of aluminum on a 1991 trip to the tiny atoll of Nikumaroro, in the Republic of Kiribati, says the 19in-by-23in slab has to be part of Earharts Lockheed Electra aircraft, which disappeared while she was flying over the Pacific. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:20:26 GMT)

When the time comes, who will succeed Irans Ayatollah Ali Khamenei?
His succession is taboo in Iran, but when he dies his countrys political trajectory will change at home and on the world stageIn a closely-guarded compound in central Tehran, often referred to simply as Beyt (the house), lives a 75-year-old man whose tenure as Irans supreme leader will expire only on the day he dies. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, one-time revolutionary, has maintained his job-for-life as the politician with ultimate power in Iran for nearly 25 years. But recent news about the ayatollahs health has revived debate on who will eventually replace him and what it will mean for the future of Iran.Although the topic of succession remains taboo at home, when its time comes Irans political trajectory will change after a quarter of century, domestically and at international levels. In September, pictures of an ailing Khamenei in a Tehran public hospital following prostate surgery triggered speculation about the succession. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:00:14 GMT)

The Premier League's 91 goalscoring nations
Victor Wanyamas goal made Kenya the latest nation to have a goalscorer in Englands top flight. Find out when each country scored and which club has introduced the most new goalscorersQuiz: test your knowledge of the Premier Leagues global scorersEric Cantona for France, Fabrizio Ravanelli for Italy, Danny Higginbotham for, um, Gibraltar these are some of the iconic (and not so iconic) players who have netted their affiliated nations first goal in the Premier League. Since the new incarnation of the English top division began in 1992-93 there have been goalscorers from 91 different countries, according to data sourced from Opta. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:19:21 GMT)

Tory MP mistakes stop and search campaigner for Mario Balotelli
Conservative Party MP Guy Opperman tweeted claiming to have seen the Liverpool striker in the Commons public galleryIts not a place youd expect to find a Premier League striker, but today Conservative Party MP Guy Opperman was so convinced hed seen the Liverpool footballer Mario Balotelli in the Commons public gallery that he tweeted to his 5,000 followers: Liverpool striker Mario Balotelli has popped in to Commons Gallery to watch the Drug Policy debate -wearing sharp suit, pink shirt &a poppy. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:38:34 GMT)

Helen Grant: deplorable comment highlights work left to eradicate sexism
Sports minister hits out after county FA officials comments Interim report published into development of womens sport Female referee told her place was in the kitchenMore work must be done to eradicate sexism in sport following the deplorable and disgraceful comments by a Northumberland County Football Association official towards a female referee, according to the sports minister, Helen Grant.John Cummings, the Northumberland FA vice-president, was this week suspended for four months by an independent regulatory commission after telling a female referee in March that a womans place is in the kitchen and not on a football field. Lucy May, a referee development officer, had asked about the possibility of officiating in the North East Sunday League at a workshop event. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:24:31 GMT)

Fifa apologises for video showing Crimea as part of Russia
Governing body has expressed regret over mistake Video was shown at launch of logo for 2018 World CupFifa has expressed regret after its video launching the logo for the 2018 World Cup showed the disputed Crimean peninsula as part of Russia.The video, broadcast as the logo was beamed on to Moscows Bolshoi Theatre on Tuesday, included a map of the host nation Russia, including Crimea. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:18:01 GMT)

Brendan Rodgers: Daniel Sturridge out of Real Madrid and Chelsea games
Liverpool forward still not recovered from calf strain Rodgers side begin demanding week at Newcastle Sturridge: my injury problems may be hereditaryBrendan Rodgers expects Daniel Sturridge to miss Liverpools most demanding week of the season as they play Newcastle United, Real Madrid and Chelsea in quick succession.Sturridge has not featured for Liverpool since 31 August because of a thigh injury suffered on England duty plus a calf strain sustained before his first full training session back with the club. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:30:06 GMT)

QPRs Harry Redknapp hits out at FA over Rio Ferdinand ban for tweet
Three-match ban does not equate, says QPR manager QPR consider appeal and defender could face Chelsea Ferdinand banned for three games over sket tweetHarry Redknapp said he was dismayed at the Football Associations decision to hand Rio Ferdinand a three-game ban and £25,000 fine for his controversial sket tweet, claiming the severity of the suspension did not equate to offences such as violent conduct.The 35-year-old former England captain directed a jibe at a follower who criticised him last month containing the word sket, which means a promiscuous girl or woman, leading to the FA charge. It is the second time Ferdinand has been reprimanded by the governing body for his use of Twitter following his endorsement of a choc ice description of Ashley Cole in 2012. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:30:06 GMT)

Austrias Matthias Brändle sets hour cycling record of 51.85 kilometres
24-year-old beats record set by Jens Voigt last month I had a difficult period in the middle of the race Wiggins sets sights on world hour record for June 2015Austrias Matthias Brändle set a new hour record of 51.85 kilometres on Thursday to eclipse Jens Voigts mark established last month.Competing at the World Cycling Centre in Aigle in Switzerland, the 24-year-old from IAM Cycling was up by almost a minute on Voigts time set on 18 September at the halfway stage and managed to hold on in the dying stages. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:41:01 GMT)

Think before you tweet: FA has made £350,000 in Twitter fines since 2011
Governing body has investigated 121 cases in last three years Ashley Coles £90,000 fine is highest paid so far Harry Redknapp defends banned Rio Ferdinand It is the fundamental rule of Twitter: Think Before You Tweet. Yet scores of people in football, ranging from global superstars to non-league officials, have broken it after they have felt the red mist descend. The consequences have included the placement of further pressure on the Football Associations compliance unit and the realisation that an ill-advised click of a button can prove damaging and rather expensive.Rio Ferdinand became the latest player to be punished for overstepping the mark on Wednesday when the FA fined him £25,000 and suspended him for three matches for a tweet that represented an aggravated breach of its rules as it included a reference to gender. More specifically, the Queens Park Rangers defender had referred to the mother of a Twitter user with the Caribbean slang term sket, which means promiscuous girl or woman. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:09:38 GMT)

Football Weekly Extra: Manchester City's slump continues
Dumped out of the Capital One Cup by Newcastle and with the Manchester derby next, can City nip their crisis in the bud? Plus, Balotelli finds the net at last, and why size does matter for Spurs Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:36:22 GMT)

Andy Murray beats Grigor Dimitrov to qualify for ATP Tour Finals
Murray wins 6-3, 6-3 in third round of Paris Masters Victory seals Murrays place at season-ending event in LondonIf there is one thing well known about Andy Murray by now, it is that he comes out swinging when his back is up against the wall. Or, indeed, when it has been under a surgeons knife. Murray was under supreme pressure when he dropped to 12th in the world after losing to Novak Djokovic in the US Open and he was given no more than an outside chance of qualifying for the ATP World Tour Finals next month. Whatever happened, he was going to have to do it the hard way.So, true to form, that is precisely what he did and on Thursday Murray was rewarded for the incredible commitment he has shown to his sport over the past six weeks when he became the fifth man to secure his place in London by reaching the quarter-final of the Paris Masters with a serene 6-3, 6-3 victory over the gifted Bulgarian, Grigor Dimitrov. In doing so, Murray ended Dimitrovs slim hopes of making it to the seasons final tournament. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:22:56 GMT)

Lost and exhausted wanderers
South Uist: For many, these island landfalls, far from their intended destination, will prove to be their lastLately, like many areas of the country, the islands have been repeatedly drenched with rain and blasted by gales. As is sometimes the case, these conditions have affected travel plans as ferry services have been disrupted, despite the best efforts of the operator.But while humans on the move have merely been delayed by the winds, for some avian travellers, the weather has had far more seriously implications, delivering them to destinations far from those they had intended to reach. Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 05:29:03 GMT)

Top 10 budget hotels and B&Bs in Mexico City
Mexico Citys hotels are as characterful as the place itself. From boutique B&Bs to palaces with old-school charm, theres much to explore without busting your budgetOpened in 1907, this design classic recalls the opulence of turn-of-the-20th-century Mexico City. Replete with overstuffed furniture, oil paintings, and stained-glass ceilings, the lobby (which also doubles as a small museum) is remarkably well preserved, as is the adjoining atrium restaurant filled with leafy plants and singing birds. Small, carpeted guestrooms show their age more readily than the common areas, with many boasting furnishings from when the hotel opened. Yet the rooms are well-priced, considering their history and the hotel has a fantastic location in the heart of the Zona Rosa. Though not as upscale as it was, this pretty neighbourhood is central, safe, and a major shopping and nightlife destination. Doubles from £72, +52 55 50 800 800, hotelgeneve.com.mx Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:00:04 GMT)

Knives out: why we love reading cruel restaurant reviews
As a food critic, I know that people love the negative reviews and that its more fun to read and write about the bad meals than the good onesWhere restaurant criticism is concerned it is hate that springs eternal. Sure, people may enjoy restaurant reviews in general, but what they really love are the takedowns. Pete Wells of the New York Times is undoubtedly well read, but it was his 2012 review of cable TV star Guy Fieris American Kitchen and Bar, phrased as a few dozen questions Did panic grip your soul as you stared into the whirling hypno wheel of the menu ? which became a national talking point. Times restaurant reviews tend to attract a few dozen comments; the Fieri review garnered over a thousand. I had a taste of that a couple of weeks ago. My somewhat negative review of Beast, an unintentionally hilarious steak and king crab place in London, went viral. It may have had something to do with my suggestion that the beef was so expensive they should, for the price, install the animal under the table so it can pleasure me while I eat. Usually my reviews are shared a few hundred times on Facebook. This one has been shared 17,500 times and has been viewed around 10 times more than any other. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:46:42 GMT)

Does Kim Kardashian have her eye on your bottom?
The celebrity is attempting to copyright her bum. How long before she comes after yours?To Los Angeles, where Lost in Showbiz learns that a landmark court case may be brewing. It derives this knowledge from a feature in leading legal periodical Closer magazine, headlined KIM KARDASHIAN FUMES OVER BOTTOM COPYCAT. We wont go into too much detail here, because quite frankly, reading the whole article made Lost in Showbiz worry that civilisation as we know it is doomed and that brimstone is going to start raining from the sky any minute. Suffice to say, the general thrust is that Kim Kardashian is angry at a woman the piece refers to as internet bottom sensation Jen Selter. Selter has been posting photographs of her large buttocks on Instagram, an activity Kardashian apparently feels is an unacceptable infringement upon her very raison detre: one of the gangplanks of Kim Kardashians global celebrity being her nonpareil ability to take photographs of her own large buttocks with a cameraphone. Kim thinks Jen copies all her poses she is fuming as she feels her curvy bum is one of her most unique selling points and feels that Jen is just trying to cash in.By this point in the article, Lost in Showbiz was losing the will to live, but the next line brought it up short. Insiders say Kim has sought legal advice to see if they can stop Jen, it read, raising the very real possibility that, somewhere in California, a crack team of lawyers may at this very moment be working around the clock to copyright buttocks on behalf of Kim Kardashian. You may say this is an entirely ridiculous scenario we are all, God willing, born with buttocks, Kanye Wests wife cant just carry on as if she personally invented the concept of having an arse. To which Lost in Showbiz can only respond: do you know how much money these people have? They can bankroll the best legal minds in America! Frankly, if anyone can copyright the concept of buttocks, its the West-Kardashians. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:41:29 GMT)

Horns review sympathy for the devil? Nope
Theres a smart black comedy trying to get out of this lumbering horror, but it and Daniel Radcliffe is devilishly dull First look review of Horns by Henry Barnes Daniel Radcliffe discusses Horns at Comic-ConSomewhere inside this lumberingly long fantasy-horror is a smart little black comedy trying to scuttle out. French scare specialist Alexandre Aja directs from an adaptation of the 2010 novel by Joe Hill, son of Stephen King. Ig Perrish is a troubled young guy played fervently, if somewhat blandly, by Daniel Radcliffe. He is hated by the community for allegedly killing his girlfriend, Merrin (Juno Temple), and then somehow beating a murder rap with the help of a smart lawyer. But  Ig is in anguish; he is entirely innocent, tormented with grief for Merrin. At the nadir of his spiritual agony, he develops two odd protuberant growths on his forehead that give him a diabolic sort of authority, hypnotising people into asking his permission to do bad stuff. Ig tries to use his new power to discover what happened to Merrin.There are a few laughs and sharp moments, but this film outstays its precarious welcome by about half an hour and strays into some weirdly humourless YA romance territory. Radcliffes performance is dull, and Temple is not allowed to do anything other than the same old wild-child routine. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:15:06 GMT)

Homeopaths offer services to help fight Ebola epidemic in west Africa
Scientists condemn homeopaths as irresponsible and cruel for offering victims false hope and for putting lives at riskHomeopaths have offered their services to prevent and treat Ebola in west Africa, claiming their remedies can work in serious epidemics of infectious disease.Homeopaths worldwide have been mobilising their efforts toward gaining entrance in those countries affected, the National Center for Homeopathy in the US said on its website. The overriding goal is to investigate Ebola firsthand, and thereby determine which remedy or remedies are best for treating this disease. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:56:20 GMT)

RT: Russia Today's six most memorable moments
As a UK version of the Kremlin-backed news channel launches, we look at its top clips, including Steven Seagal and Vladimir PutinRussias state funded news channel RT, formerly Russia Today, launches its dedicated UK news channel on Thursday, which aims to dissect the implications of major international developments for UK audiences. To mark its arrival, we look at back at some of its most memorable moments.In August 2013 journalist and foreign correspondent James Kirchick was invited on to RT to discuss Chelsea Mannings sentencing. He decided instead to use the opportunity to attack Russias anti-gay laws: Being here on a Kremlin-funded propaganda network, Im gonna wear my gay pride suspenders, and Im gonna speak out against the horrific anti-gay legislation that Vladimir Putin has signed into law, that was passed by the Russian Duma, that criminalises homosexual propaganda [and] that effectively makes it illegal to talk about homosexuality in public. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:21:48 GMT)

How to make the perfect cinder toffee
Do you use butter and honey or keep it simple with sugar? Is there anything finer to eat around the bonfire, and do you make any other recipes that are more akin to a science experiment?How to make the perfect tabletCinder toffee (also known as puff candy or sea foam, depending on where you are in the world) is best described, to the uninitiated, as that stuff you get inside a Crunchie bar. It is brittle yet sticky, with an airy, honeycomb-like texture that makes it well-nigh impossible not to eat one piece too many, and an addictive slightly bitter edge, thanks to the caramelised sugar and the bicarbonate of soda that creates all the holes.Along with the similarly bitter but rather chewier treacle variety, and the smothered-apple sort, cinder toffee is a popular choice for those commemorating the grisly downfall of Mr Guy Fawkes (or, at least, enjoying some fireworks and an almighty bonfire) on 5 November. It is certainly one of the most fun things you can make in the kitchen, more akin to a chemistry experiment than a recipe, but with rather more delicious results than even the infamous exploding custard tin. But whats the best way to make it? Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 07:00:35 GMT)

Rosie the Riveter's old Michigan factory to become aviation museum
Yankee Air Museum to move into old Willow Run plant following campaign to save building as commemoration of womens contribution to second world war effort Rosie the Riveter and other women workers in picturesA second world war aircraft factory in Michigan that was home to Rosie the Riveter has been saved from the wrecking ball following an $8m campaign to relocate a nearby aviation museum.Yankee Air Museum board chairman Ray Hunter signed papers on Thursday to take ownership of a 144,000sq ft slice of the former Willow Run plant, where Rose Will Monroe and other workers built B-24 Liberator bombers during the second world war. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:02:57 GMT)

Learning a language 10 things you need to know
Thinking about learning a foreign language? From ignoring your age to avoiding the F-word, our multilingual experts share their tips1. Make realistic, specific goalsYou have decided to learn another language. Now what? On our recent live chat our panellists first piece of advice was to ask yourself: what do you want to achieve and by when? Donavan Whyte, vice president of enterprise and education at Rosetta Stone, says: Language learning is best when broken down into manageable goals that are achievable over a few months. This is far more motivating and realistic. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:00:01 GMT)

British food winning over the French
Shorter lunch breaks mean young French people are aping Britons with Pret A Manger and Marks & Spencer filling the gapYou cant trust people whose cuisine is so bad. It was 2005 when Frances president Jacques Chirac made his infamous put-down of his British neighbours.But almost 10 years on, British food is flying off French shelves so much so that posh crisps from companies such as Tyrrells are known as English crisps and Marks & Spencers bestselling ready meal in Paris is that British classic, chicken tikka masala. The home of camembert, brie and roquefort is even buying British cheese. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:04:53 GMT)

What kind of Nigeria will the Chibok girls come back to?
Hopes of release faded into weary cynicism this week. Its a feeling Nigerians have grown used toThe news that the Nigerian government and Boko Haram had reached a deal that would secure the release of the Chibok girls was received with excitement all over the world. I landed in Nigeria the day the news broke, and my phone was flooded with texts and messages to the effect of Have you heard?. Then, as the days passed and the girls did not materialise, anticipation cooled into watchfulness and watchfulness soured into cynicism. Theyre always releasing false statements, a relative of mine said the other day. Just let us know when they get home.The Chibok girls have become a symbol of everything that is wrong with Nigeria. They were abducted because the state failed to protect them. They have remained in captivity, first because their disappearance was not treated as an issue of national significance and then because despite pouring billions of dollars into defence, the army tasked with finding them is worse equipped than Boko Haram. Almost the entire population of this country can give instances where state neglect or state greed or state indifference has led to calamity in our lives. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:00:04 GMT)

How Winston Churchill is making life difficult for David Cameron
Boris Johnsons new book lauds a model of leadership no modern politician can live up toAmid the splendour of Blenheim Palace, west Oxfordshire, an area we might reasonably describe as David Camerons manor, Boris Johnson will on Friday night weave his spell. The mayor of London is promoting his new book a thing he rattled off to suppress the ennui of running the capital The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History.Johnsons theme is leadership, and as he visits the great mans birthplace, he considers two leaders. One returned from exile to save the nation in its darkest hour. The other, more contemporary, will arrive dramatically, on a zip wire perhaps, to save the Conservative party. The nations salvation will be as much a certainty as night following day. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:40:48 GMT)

Zambians dont care about our new presidents skin colour
The world may be shocked that Guy Scott is white but for Zambians its a sign of political progress, akin to the US electing ObamaOne of the most insidious forms of prejudice is the inability to see beyond ones own understanding of what prejudice even looks like. Consider the media flurry over the death on Tuesday of Michael Sata, the fifth president of Zambia. Major news outlets the BBC, al-Jazeera and CNN have dutifully reported the facts: Sata, who concealed his terminal illness for months, was known as King Cobra for his vitriolic tongue; his politics entailed aggressive, sometimes racially inflected, jabs at ruling and infiltrating powers (the Zambian elite, the Chinese); he did some good, he did some bad; he fell short, he will be missed. But most of these reports have also placed curious emphasis on Satas vice-president, Guy Scott, who will now step in as interim president for the 90-day period mandated by the constitution before a general election is held.Untimely presidential death by illness has happened in Zambia before, as recently as 2008. When Levy Mwanawasa died halfway through his second term, the vice-president, Rupiah Banda, stepped in and won the interim election. So why is the world so interested in this old story from this young country? Well, as the BBC put it: Zambian President Sata death: White interim leader appointed. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:14:48 GMT)

The Guardian view on Halloween: a game we all can play
We need a festival for autumn, death and darkness. But does it have to be so tacky?This year, Americans will spend nearly $7.5bn on a dressing-up game played for one day a year. Halloween is an occasion to make an anthropologist salivate, and a humanist despair. There is an element of seasonal melancholy or nostalgia to this complaint: 1,700 years ago there were probably pagans to lament the way that shallow Britons, aping the fashions of their Roman colonial masters, had taken up ridiculous made-up Christian saints to replace the depth and richness of the old pagan rituals.Yet there is something dispiriting in the shrunken imagination of commercial Halloween. Soon everyone will recognise that the true colours of autumn are black and orange plastic. This is an impoverishment of older and richer traditions but it cant really be blamed on commercialism. The old traditions died because they no longer literally moved anyone. Commercial Halloween is popular because it is a game that anyone can play. Children and adults all find themselves doing things: walking around, talking to strangers, exploring and claiming their neighbourhoods. Its true that Halloween reduces death and evil to a joke, where the solemnities of All Souls Day and traditions like picnicking in graveyards took death and loss and darkness much more seriously. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:14:01 GMT)

The Sistine Chapel in 3D? The Vatican must think we are all idiots
3D experiences cannot replace seeing Michelangelos wonderful art in the flesh. Does Italy just hate tourists?Does the Vatican think everyone who visits the Sistine Chapel is an idiot?New arrangements to see Michelangelos frescoes in the Vatican seem to view tourists as the enemy, to be fobbed off with 3D spectacles and virtual reality while perhaps being allowed to spend only a limited time looking up at Michelangelos real paintings. Yet meanwhile, the pope is allowing the chapel to be used for corporate events. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:28:29 GMT)

Martha Fernbacks tragic experience proves the need for drug reform
Lets be honest about the damage caused by drug laws that fail to protect and can proliferate criminalityOn 20 July 2013, Martha Fernback swallowed half a gram of MDMA powder and died. She was 15 years old. Martha should be celebrating her 17th birthday today. She isnt because the current drug laws failed to protect her. Because prohibition hasnt stopped risk taking, but it has made those risks worse.On Marthas birthday her mother, Anne-Marie Cockburn, will be in parliament to listen to MPs debating whether or not the terms of the Misuse of Drugs Act should be based on an assessment of the best possible evidence. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:17:13 GMT)

The Guardian view of the US midterms: plenty to shout about
Barack Obama has a good record. The Democrats should defend it more assertivelyDavid Camerons government presides over a British economy that has grown by 3% in the past year, figures published last week said. Across the Atlantic, though, Barack Obamas administration presides over one that is doing even better than that. Figures released on Thursday showed the US economy growing by 3.5% over 12 months. This followed Wednesdays vote of confidence in the economy embodied by the Federal Reserves decision to end quantitative easing after six years. So is it celebratory diet colas all round?Hardly. The prime minister and the president also have other things in common. Each in his very different way lacks the common touch. And neither seems able to leverage a strengthening economy into political popularity. In fact, quite the reverse. In the US, Mr Obamas Democrats seem to be heading for a clunking defeat in the midterm elections next week. This disjunction between economic performance and political success would seem to upend one of the great cliches of modern politics. These days its the economy stupid except when it isnt. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:14:30 GMT)

Samaritans Radar is a crude tool for flagging suicide risks - but it will save lives
The suicide prevention app has been clumsy with user privacy, but online warnings are an important step towards the harder work of supporting people offline Mental health among Britains youth is shockingly concerning. Suicide is the leading cause of death in men under the age of 35 in the UK, while it is estimated that 9.6% of young people aged 5-16 have a clinically recognised mental health condition.Anything that helps to better this situation is great, and particularly as it is crucial to catch mental ill health early on. Struggling with a serious mental health condition as a young person can seriously impact a persons future I speak from experience.As @susanhalluk points out #SamaritansRadar takes automated decisions by processing personal data. So I've sent this https://t.co/x9ArIfZaGRWhen we've received your DM we will add you to our whitelist and your Tweets will no longer trigger #SamaritansRadar alerts. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:27:14 GMT)

Lets embrace our grumpiness. We cant help it its the British way
Our alleged predisposition for depression could be viewed more positively. For a start, cynicism is good for democracyAs studies have shown, science stories go, Thursdays report that happiness relates to our genetic heritage may appeal to our desire for explanations. It links happiness with an alleged British predisposition for depression as arising from a particular form of the serotonin gene. The Express goes a stage further and links this to grumpiness and being miserable.Leaving aside the science, there is something revealing about the delight taken in declaring this apparent genetic determinism. Unsurprisingly. Seeing ourselves as grumpy, miserable and cynical is a part of our cultural construction that many of us in the UK revel in. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:23:51 GMT)

The Guardian view on protests against taxing the internet in Hungary: Europe needs to show its support
The net is the last platform for criticism and dissent in Hungary. Europe should back the protests against taxes that would limit its useHungarians came out on the streets of Budapest and other cities this week demonstrating against prime minister Viktor Orbáns plans to tax internet use. Long accused of centralising power and eroding the countrys democratic institutions, Mr Orbán is now charged by his critics with plotting to restrict access to the internet, the only significant information space still largely uncontrolled by the government, by making it too expensive for many users.Mr Orbán may well believe that he can weather this outbreak of discontent, as he has done with earlier protests on issues ranging from the recruitment of the judiciary to the regulations governing tobacconists shops. After all, his dominance of the Hungarian political scene is all but complete. In April his Fidesz party won its second consecutive two-thirds majority in parliament, and most of the media have been bullied into subservience. Yet the internet issue could nevertheless be a turning point because the net is seen as the last platform for dissent, accurate reporting, and opposition to what Mr Orbán himself has described as his project to create an illiberal state. The mix of nationalism, autocracy, and anti-western ideology he says is necessary to equip Hungary for the rigours of global competition recalls that of his model and political ally, Vladimir Putin. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:14:16 GMT)

The 10 greatest changes of the past 1,000 years
In Europe, the last millennium has been shaped by successive waves of change, but which shifts, in which centuries, have really shaped the modern world? Historian Ian Mortimer identifies the 10 leading drivers of change Ten of the worst years in British historyMost people think of castles as representative of conflict. However, they should be seen as bastions of peace as much as war. In 1000 there were very few castles in Europe and none in England. This absence of local defences meant that lands were relatively easy to conquer William the Conquerors invasion of England was greatly assisted by the lack of castles here. Over the 11th century, all across Europe, lords built defensive structures to defend them and their land. It thus became much harder for kings to simply conquer their neighbours. In this way, lords tightened their grip on their estates, and their masters started to think of themselves as kings of territories, not of tribes. Political leaders were thus bound to defend their borders and govern everyone within those borders, not just their own people. Thats a pretty enormous change by anyones standards. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 11:34:53 GMT)

How insects could feed the world
Is eating bugs the solution to feeding the worlds growing population of human beings and livestock? Emily Anthes chews on locusts, beetles, mealworms and more as she tries to find outAt first, my meal seems familiar, like countless other dishes Ive eaten at Asian restaurants. A swirl of noodles slicked with oil and studded with shredded chicken, the aroma of ginger and garlic, a few wilting chives placed on the plate as a final flourish. And then, I notice the eyes. Dark, compound orbs on a yellow speckled head, joined to a winged, segmented body. I hadnt spotted them right away, but suddenly I see them everywhere my noodles are teeming with insects. I cant say I wasnt warned. Ive agreed to be a guinea pig at an experimental insect tasting in Wageningen, a university town in the Netherlands. My hosts are Ben Reade and Josh Evans from the Nordic Food Lab, a non-profit culinary research institute. Reade and Evans lead the labs insect deliciousness project, a three-year effort to turn insects into tasty treats. The project began after René Redzepi (the chef and co-owner of Noma, the Danish restaurant that is often ranked the best in the world) tasted an Amazonian ant that reminded him of lemongrass. Redzepi, who founded the Nordic Food Lab in 2008, became interested in serving insects at Noma and asked the researchers at the lab to explore the possibilities. The Food Lab operates from a houseboat in Copenhagen, but Reade and Evans are in the Netherlands for a few days, and theyve borrowed a local kitchen to try out some brand new dishes. Along with three other gutsy gastronomes, I am here to taste the results. We take our seats at a long, high table as Reade and Evans wheel in a trolley loaded with our meals. We each receive a different main course. I get the Asian-style noodles and fixate on the bug I can see. Thats a locust, Reade says. [It] was alive this morning. Very fresh. But hes much more excited about another, hidden ingredient: fat extracted from the larvae of black soldier flies (or, to put it less delicately, maggot fat). The whole dish has been stir-fried in it.I believe youre the first human being on the planet to have ever been served anything cooked with this, Reade tells me. But not to worry: Ive eaten some of it myself, an hour ago. Im still alive.Yellow jacket wasp larvae are big in Japan, cicadas are treasured in Malawi, and weaver ants are popular in ThailandIn some ways, roaches are no different to gorillas, gerbils or iguanas, or any creatures that we dont routinely eatThe mealworm quiche tasted fine, the mealworms had a slightly nutty, toasted flavour, but it still made my stomach turn Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 06:00:37 GMT)

Muhammad Ali through the eyes of the photographers who know him best
Muhammad Ali has been the subject of some of the most celebrated photographs ever taken. To mark the 40th anniversary of one of his most bruising fights, the Rumble in the Jungle, our sport picture editor, Jonny Weeks, has talked exclusively to several of the photographers who have known and shot Ali among them, Neil Leifer, Carl Fischer and Thomas Hoepker to hear their experiences and to learn the stories behind the iconic photos they capturedMuhammad Ali 25 of the best photographs of the legendary boxerThink of a photograph of Muhammad Ali besides those pictured above I suspect theres a good chance you thought of that wonderful shot of Ali towering over Sonny Liston in the first round of their heavyweight title fight in 1965, where Ali, visibly irate, is beckoning his opponent up from the canvas with a digger-like swing of his right arm. If not, then you doubtless know the photograph Im talking about: its that famous. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:00:04 GMT)

Politics Weekly podcast: Scottish Labour, Mediterranean migrants and US midterms
Libby Brooks, Anne Perkins, Ken Rudin and Martin Kettle join Hugh Muir to discuss Labour's Scottish meltdown, migration across the Mediterranean Sea and the US mid-term elections Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:39:00 GMT)

Will coal or solar power fuel Indias drive to bring electricity to its villages?
Narendra Modi says 400 million Indians without electricity will be connected, but plans for new coal mines are controversialThe village of Geer in Madhya Pradesh is about to undergo the simplest of revolutions. After 25 years of being told electricity is coming, it is finally here. After sunset we cant do anything so we sit in the darkness. The children cannot study. We go to bed early, says Chotelal Gupta, who runs the nearest thing Geer has to a shop. It is no more than a cupboard really, selling sweets and biscuits. But in the last few weeks Gupta has started to stock lightbulbs as the villagers wire up their homes.A small crowd of villagers stand around the transformer for the big switch-on. This is India, where no such moment can happen without a few prayers, the breaking of a coconut and the burning of incense. In the absence of a local dignitary they turn to me to do the honours. It reminds me of my wedding; I had no idea what was going on then either. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:03:50 GMT)

London housing crisis: seven bright ideas from Islington
The Labour-run borough of Boris and Blair has some imaginative policies for meeting local affordable housing need The cluster of predicaments that make housing too expensive for so many Londoners manifests in Islington with striking clarity. The birthplace of Blairism, the home of Boris Johnson and the sixth most deprived local authority area in the UK, the borough is as trendy as it is pricey as it is poor. Like other inner London boroughs, Islington knows both the gains and the strains of gentrification. Indeed, it can claim to be the phenomenons spiritual home, the place where the lately deceased architect Harley Sherlock helped pioneer it by reviving neglected streets and sociologist Ruth Glass critiqued it. As London entered the 1980s, Upper Street, linking Highbury to the Angel by way of the Town Hall, was one of its most bohemian avenues, all alternative theatre, radical book shops and social deviants. I know all about those - I was one of them. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:19:44 GMT)

Not just a girls' problem: the economic impact of menstrual shame
Traditions around menstruation mean the majority of Nepali girls miss days of school. Can education change beliefs?During our periods, we used to have to clean our sleeping areas with leaves and werent allowed to enter the house, says 12-year-old Sushila who lives in Gorkha district, central Nepal. Now, we can sleep in our beds. We must be open about menstruation. When Sushila first got her period, she had to stay home from school for 11 days. She wasnt allowed to touch books. Sushilas situation is common in much of Nepal: 95% of adolescent girls surveyed in the mid and western regions practice some kind of restrictions during their periods, from staying home from school or temple to having to sleep outside. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:26:56 GMT)

China's obsession with vertical cities
By the end of next year one-in-three of the worlds 100m+ skyscrapers will be in China, as its state-orchestrated urbanisation drive prompts a megacity building bonanzaIn late September, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, a non-profit organisation that keeps the worlds largest database on skyscrapers, held its annual conference in Shanghai two years after its last meeting there. Weve never done that before, gone back to the same city, says Antony Wood, the councils executive director. But right now, most of the major advances in the typology, in design or in technical terms, are happening in China.As the global population rises and cities become more crowded, the fabric of urban centres is changing. Nowhere is the phenomenon more pronounced than in China, where a state-orchestrated urbanisation drive has prompted a megacity building bonanza characterised by skyscrapers and sprawl. By the end of 2015, one in three of the worlds buildings over 150-metres will be in China. Construction of the worlds second-tallest building, the 632-metre tall Shanghai Tower, is due to be completed next year. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:54:05 GMT)

Private zoos boasting exotic animals the new status symbol of Armenia's elite
Government accused of turning blind eye to importation of endangered species with cheetahs, lions, tigers and bears kept as pets. EurasiaNet.org reportsThe neighbours of Mher Sedrakian, an MP in Armenias ruling Republican party, have a persistent problem with noise. But this is not about wild parties or car horns. Rather, it is about lions.The lions that Sedrakian allegedly keeps as pets at his home in the Armenian capital Yerevan roar continuously, his neighbours complain. Increasingly, many Armenians can understand that concern. Private zoos with lions, tigers and bears are emerging as a popular hobby for the wealthy and powerful, and the government does not seem inclined to intervene. Instead, recent amendments to wildlife legislation seem to facilitate this pastime. Private citizens are allowed to own wild animals, including endangered species, as long as they provide areas for the animals that ensure their life, health and safety, and prevent escape from captivity, the law says. Supervision is supposed to be constant. But it is not. Last November, tiger cubs were found in the streets of Etchmiadzin, a town about 12 miles from the capital, Yerevan, local media reported. Although tigers, as an endangered species, cannot be exported from the wild, their import from zoos is allowed. A search of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites) database for 2008 to 2013 shows the import of six tigers to Armenia, including three Siberian tigers from Ukraine. The others came from Belgium, Chile and Kazakhstan. An Armenian border guard official, who declined to be named, said that a tiger can be brought into the country if documents show its country of origin and demonstrate that it is the third generation of a zoo-based line. A Cites certificate that authorises the animals shipment is also required, said Hovhannes Mkrtchian, head of the ministry of agricultures food security department, which checks import documents and verifies the animals health. Yet investigative reports by the news site Hetq.am indicate that not all of the exotic animals imported into Armenia for example an endangered bonobo end up in the Cites database. Similarly, though crocodiles were offered for sale in Yerevan supermarkets last December for New Years celebrations, the database contains no mention of their import as food products. It does, however, show an array of exotic imports. Cheetahs topped the feline list, with 18 imports from the United Arab Emirates and South Africa between 2008 and 2013. Nine lions were brought in during the same period; most from the United Arab Emirates. Forty-one dumbo-eared fennec foxes, natives of the Sahara, entered Armenia between 2009 and 2010, while 21 rheas, ostrich-like birds from South America, made the trip in 2012. Whether or not these animals were meant for the Yerevan zoo was not immediately clear. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:33:40 GMT)

Nicola Sturgeon on tour
The SNPs incoming leader meets new party members in Edinburgh, but can she transform them into an election-winning army?Big Country has been playing on a loop for what feels like my entire life but is probably only ten minutes. So when the audience get to their feet for Nicola Sturgeon at the Edinburgh Corn Exchange, its hard to tell if they are simply relieved that the eighties rock anthems have ceased.When I interviewed her the other week, Sturgeon seemed a wee bit allergic to the word tour, perhaps because it conjures images of blouson jackets with Team Nicola on the back. But thats what it says on the press release for her - um - tour of the country to meet the thousands of new members who have joined the SNP since the referendum. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:29:16 GMT)

Bob Dylans back pages: the truth behind the Basement Tapes
The Basement Tapes have never before been heard in their entirety. Now, with the official release of all 138 songs, Dylan expert Clinton Heylin examines the myth and the reality of one of rocks seminal long-lost masterpiecesIn June 1975, between Blood on the Tracks and Desire, Bob Dylan approved the release of the most famous publishing demos in pop. The Basement Tapes, recorded off the radar in the summer of 1967, in the garage of the Bands rented house in West Saugerties in upstate New York (which a previous owner had painted a gaudy pink), are seen as the missing link between the expansive Blonde on Blonde and the pared-down simplicity of John Wesley Harding. They were also the first music Dylan made as he recovered from a serious motorcycle accident on 29 July 1966, even as the dust of rumour conspired to cover him.For six months after the accident Dylan, recuperated by cutting himself off from music, as he had done once before, after the Kennedy assassination, just jotting down lyrics. The rest of the time Dylan spent poring over books by people you never heard of, thinking about where Im going, and why am I running and am I mixed up too much and what am I knowing and what am I giving and what am I taking. Or so he told the one journalist he spoke to on the record at the time, Michael Iachetta of the New York Daily News. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:26:27 GMT)

FGM: Ban Ki-moon backs Guardians global media campaign
UN chief launches grants initiative in Kenya as part of Guardian-UNFPA push to change how female genital mutilation is reported and perceivedThe UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, is backing a groundbreaking global media campaign led by the Guardian to revolutionise how female genital mutilation is reported and perceived across the world, with the aim of ending the practice.Speaking at a key meeting with the heads of all of Kenyas main media organisations at the UN headquarters in Nairobi, he announced five international FGM reporting grants co-funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Guardian which will see key journalists in Kenya focus on FGM in an attempt to eradicate the harmful practice within a generation. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:22:01 GMT)

Young Fathers: Winning the Mercury doesn't tell us anything we didnt already know
This years prizewinners refused to crack a smile at the ceremony, but theyre more than happy about the recognition and now theyre off to Berlin to make a totally different albumHello Young Fathers! Congratulations on your album Dead winning the Mercury music prize wheres the award going?Graham G Hastings: Its going home, to my mums. [Fondles spike on the award] It looks quite dangerous actually (1) its definitely more dangerous than the nominees award. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:32:31 GMT)

What have Katie Price and Oscar Pistorius been chatting about?
The star and the athlete swapped messages on Twitter, Price has revealed at her latest and inexplicably low-key book launch, which featured not one single black stallionThis week, Lost in Showbiz arrives bearing important news for the intellectuals among its readership: no, it cant imagine there are many of them either, but lets press on. Thinkers and scholars, stop whatever it is that youre doing! Put down that copy of the Paris Review, cease making notes in the margin of The Kreutzer Sonata, press pause on that podcast about triangulation and the intersections between languages and literary traditions. Pray silence, bibliophiles, for the literary event of the year is upon us: Katie Price has published her ninth novel, and Lost in Showbiz couldnt be more excited.Yes, there are those who churlishly make a song and dance about the fact that Price doesnt actually write her novels, who raise a knowing eyebrow when the question of authorship crops up in interviews (Have you always channelled your life into your books? Not completely.). It can only direct them to the recent interview in which, challenged to prove she could actually write, Price came up with the opening paragraph to a novel: Im sitting on a swing in the garden with the wind hitting my face and the grass freshly cut and it smelled nice. I had my hair in pigtails with red bows with bright polka dots, with suspenders on and no knickers. And I lifted the dishwasher open and it smelled like wet labradors. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:10:40 GMT)

Top literary agent Andrew Wylie calls Amazon Isis-like distribution channel
Wylie calls for fellow publishers to stand firm and not to blink during negotiations over ebook royalties with digital retailerHe is the sinister jackal of the literary world who counts Salman Rushdie, Philip Roth and Martin Amis among his formidable roster of clients.Andrew Wylie, arguably the most powerful literary agent in the world who once described himself as a ravenous dog has now sunk his teeth into Amazon, describing the online retailer as a sort of Isis-like distribution channel. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:53:09 GMT)

Hillary Clinton heckled by immigration activists at latest stop in campaign tour
With the possible exception of husband Bill, Clinton has been in demand in the lead-up to the midterm elections to bolster Democratic candidates chancesHillary Clinton was repeatedly heckled during a campaign stop on Thursday after immigration reform activists took turns to interrupt her speech before being escorted out of an auditorium by police.The coordinated protest during a rally for Maryland gubernatorial candidate Anthony Brown, involved about two dozen students dotted around the audience who intermittently shouted at Clinton and held aloft placards that read Put Families Over Politics. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 23:35:00 GMT)

Togo Igawa: how I became the RSCs first Japanese actor
Sean Bean whispered when we passed each other in the corridor: Togo, the Queen laughed at your twitching.After I moved to England from Japan in 1983, I was asked to audition for the RSC. I had to prepare a set piece. As I had belonged to one theatre company for 13 years in Japan, I had never had an audition and didnt know what a set piece was. I was one of the founding members of Black Tent theatre. We travelled all over Japan with an enormous tent that could seat 500 people.While I was waiting for my turn in the green room at the Barbican, there were other actors with Shakespeares sonnets in their hands who were waiting for their turn. The piece I prepared was not Shakespeare but a short scene with Japanese soldiers and an American POW in Hiroshima Castle. I played all three characters and wore a Japanese army headband, which also became a black blindfold. It was a very physical piece, with Japanese dialogue and a part of the Lords Prayer in English. John Barton, who is really a living encyclopedia of Shakespeare, might have felt it was unique. Anyway, he made the mistake of choosing me for the company. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:29:41 GMT)

Meet Ibeyi: French-Cuban twins with a musical sixth sense
The daughters of a famous Cuban percussionist, Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz have won attention transforming their fiery relationship into electro-tinged contemporary negro spiritualsSometimes Lisa-Kaindé Díaz will be wandering around her apartment, singing to herself, only to find twin sister Naomi singing exactly the same song, at exactly the same part.It is not strange to us for that to happen, she says. Or at least I think Lisa-Kaindé says it their tendency to complete each others sentences, disagree furiously mid-sentence, or just tumble their thoughts over the top of each others makes it hard to untangle exactly who is saying what. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:28:26 GMT)

Game of Thrones stars reportedly sign up for seventh season
Actors including Lena Headey and Kit Harington reported to have negotiated huge salary increases in return for re-signing with HBOs hugely popular showGame of Thrones looks set to return for a seventh season netting its stars a bumper payday.The Hollywood Reporter writes that the shows lead actors have renegotiated their contracts, which only covered six seasons of the show, to include an option for a seventh. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:33:17 GMT)

Michael Bay to direct drama about killing of US ambassador in Benghazi
Transformers director to take on adaptation of Thirteen Hours: A Firsthand Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi, which tells of the killing of four men on 11 September 2012With the Transformers movies, the Bad Boys films and Armageddon on his list of directorial credits, Michael Bays reputation has not been one founded on diplomatic nuance. But the US director will hope to show off a hitherto unheralded knack for subtle political drama after entering talks to direct a new film about the fatal 2012 terror attacks on a US compound in Libya.13 Hours is titled after Mitchell Zuckoffs book Thirteen Hours: A Firsthand Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi, which details the assault by local insurgents on 11 Sept, 2012, the anniversary of 9/11. The initial attack left US ambassador J Christopher Stevens and diplomat Sean Smith dead, with a second assault on a separate CIA compound one mile away later killing two CIA contractors, Tyrone S Woods and Glen Doherty. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:24:00 GMT)

How Interstellar made Michael Caine think again about climate change
Mother natures going to be fine but we might not be, adds Matthew McConaughey, star of film that addresses humans place in the cosmosIn Christopher Nolans new movie, humanitys hope for survival is pinned on one man: Matthew McConaughey, pilot of a last-ditch mission to find humans a new home as Earth becomes uninhabitable. And in turn, Interstellar, which opens worldwide on 7 November, heads towards cinemas heavy with expectations.In a year strikingly light on both critical and commercial hits, its down to this three-hour Imax epic to save cinema as the clock ticks on the last quarter. Nolan has millions of devoted fans from his Batman trilogy, plus the rare clout to get studio backing for adult blockbusters which dont feature superheroes. Early screenings have attracted very warm reviews, Oscar buzz and comparisons to Kubricks 2001, whose extended deep space sequences Nolan appears to ape. Continue reading...
(Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:43:31 GMT)

Football transfer rumours: Arsenal to sign Stephan Lichtsteiner and Virgil van Dijk?
Todays rumours are mesmerised by No1The Mill suspects that Arsène Wenger has a vast collection of a certain type of magazine. Model-building magazines, of course! You know, the ones where the first issue is cheap and comes with the first part of a magnificent ship or tank or rocket or something, the second issue is a little more expensive and includes another part of the model, and then each subsequent issue is really quite dear because the publishers reckon youll want to complete your creation so you can display it proudly on your mantelpiece alongside all the candlestick-holders/empty wine bottles. But most people never get round to buying the full series of magazines and so have homes full of half-ships and quarter-trains, just as Wenger has for several years had a football team just a couple of pieces short of completion.Well, now we read that Wenger has been nagged into doing something about that! The relentless complaining from Arsenal fans has, apparently, convinced the manager to spend January tracking down the parts missing from his model team although the first step, we read, will be to buy another right-back to go with the two he bought last summer. But the acquisition of Stephan Lichtsteiner from Juventus could allow Callum Chambers to be converted permanently into a centre-back. Similarly, the arrival of another centre-back, Celtics Virgil van Dijk could allow Chambers to be pegged permanently as a right-back. So what were saying is, Wenger seems set on building baroque defence with many extravagant embellishments. Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 09:22:58 GMT)

An American horror story: 'real' haunted houses in pictures
Halloween special: Photographer Seph Lawless whose eerie images of abandoned shopping malls we featured this summer has explored houses blighted by tragic histories in his new book, 13: An American Horror Story Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:18:20 GMT)

Shoshana Roberts speaks out about New York street harassment video video
Shoshana Roberts, the actor in the two-minute New York street harassment video released this week, defends the project. Roberts says the video didn't show all the incidents of harassment or document more serious cases of harassment, such as groping or sexual assault. She says harassment causes 'unnecessary stress' and that people need to be told to stop doing it Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:24:00 GMT)

Halloween preparations around the world in pictures
Halloween is almost upon us. Heres a look at how guys and ghouls around the world are getting ready for this freaky FridayEmma Brockes: What your offensive Halloween costume says about you Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:49:40 GMT)

Diva bunnies and unicorn haters: David Shrigley is back!
Full of his trademark subversive surrealism and edge-of-madness rants, artist David Shrigleys new screed is his biggest, and most laugh-out-loud, yetWeak Messages Create Bad Situations: A Manifesto is out now Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 07:00:40 GMT)

How to build a business: 'Accept all the blame and defer all the praise'
In the debut of the Guardian's Small Business Conversations video series, Wayne Sosin, the owner of Worksman Cycles, compares experiences with Kent Kilroe, owner of bespoke menswear maker Freemans Sporting Club Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:55:00 GMT)

The UK mountain photo of the year awards in pictures
The winner of Trail magazines UK mountain photo of the year was taken on a £10 camera. We take a look at the spectacular winning shot, as well as the runners-up in the competition Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:38:59 GMT)

Mercury music prize 2014 finalists in pictures
The Roundhouse in London played host to the annual Mercury music prize last night with Edinburghs experimental trio Young Fathers scooping the prestigious award. Heres the rest of the nominees on the red carpet Young Fathers: misfits deserving of their Mercury prize win Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:10:56 GMT)

Behind the rise of nanobreweries: 'The challenges of making beer on this scale are endless' - video
New York got a late start in the craft beer market, but the city is making up for lost time. The number of microbreweries jumped from three in 2011 to 14 this year. Small brewers benefit from tax breaks, but they still face many challenges. 'Real estate is one of the biggest obstacles you have in the city,' says NYC Brewers Guild president Kelly Taylor. 'That's why I think you are going to see a lot more 'nanos' in New York City.'Nanobreweries produce a small quantity of beer per batch fewer than five barrels per batch. Some of them are small enough to fit into a family garage, as the Guardian's Ana Terra Athayde finds out Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:32:00 GMT)

Bruce Springsteen in pictures to mark 30 years since Born in the USA
On 30 October 1984, Born in the USA was released. To coincide with the anniversary, a new book charts Bruce Springsteens musical career, influences, lyrics, politics and cultural impact. The book contains over 250 images, spanning his 40-year career here are some of the bestSpringsteen: Album by Album by Ryan White is out now (Carlton, £30) Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 07:00:35 GMT)

Muhammad Ali's 'Rumble in the Jungle' revisited  video report
Muhammad Ali and George Foreman's 'rumble in the jungle' in Kinshasa took place 40 years ago on Thursday. The fight on 30 October 1974 was Ali's chance to regain his world heavyweight title. Foreman was the favourite for the clash but Ali managed to win, knocking his opponent out in the 8th round of a 15-round bout, to reclaim the title Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:33:00 GMT)

What happens to your Facebook account when you die?
When a Facebook user dies, there are two options: delete the account or memorialise it. How can people plan for their digital legacy? Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:41:55 GMT)

Steven Gerrard: its up to Liverpool whether Im at Anfield next season
Former England captain has yet to sign contract extension I wont be retiring this summer. I will play beyond this season Continue reading...
(Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:16:20 GMT)

Stephen King: Religion is a dangerous tool but I choose to believe God exists
Blockbuster author reveals his spiritual side in lengthy Q&A to launch new novel that deals with a ministers loss of faith Continue reading...
(Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:02:35 GMT)

Australians think Muslim population is nine times greater than it really is
International Ipsos Mori poll shows Australians are also wildly wrong in their estimations on teen pregnancy, immigrants and unemployment How well do you know Australia? Take the quiz Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 02:47:05 GMT)

Tim Cook: 'I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me'
Apple CEO Tim Cook has written about his sexuality for the first time, in the hope that he can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is Continue reading...
(Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:58:33 GMT)

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