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NANA ADDO TRULY RUBS JAK THE WRONG WAY

Author:
Mr Bean
Date:
2011-07-10 15:27:42


THAT HE WANTS TO PUT SAND INTO HIS GARI

IT IS OBVIOUS THAT JAK FEELS MORE COMFORTABLE UNDER MILLS THAN HE WILL EVER BE UNDER THE VIOLENT AND VINDICTIVE YENAKANFUO MAN

HIS EXECELLENCY, THE FORMER PRESIDENT MR ADJEKUM KUFOUR INSINUATED IN HIS INTERVIEW WITH FT THAT SOME WITHIN HIS PARTY WANTED HIM TO HOLD ONTO POWER BUT HE REFUSED BECAUSE THAT WOULD AMOUNT TO A CONSTITUTIONAL COUP

NOW WE KNOW THAT GROUP WAS THE DREADED AKYEM MAFIA LED BY THE HOTHED NANA ADDO HIMSELF

AND THIS IS THE ROTTEN POTATO NPP WOULD WANT TO SELL TO GHANAIANS AS A HUMAN RIGHT FIGHTER AND RESPECTOR OF RULE OF LAW

TWEA, NANA ADDO WILL NOT BECOME THE PRESIDENT OF KWAME NKRUMAH'S GHANA

I BRING YOU AN EXCERPT FROM THAT INTERVIEW

Akuffo-Addo embarassed me - Kufuor

Former President John Agyekum Kufour has disclosed that if he ever had an issue with the flagbearer of the New Patriotic Party (NPP), Nana Addo Danquah Akufo-Addo, it would be when Nana took a decision to go to court during the last round of the 2008 elections.

Mr. Kufuor said in interview broadcast on Adom TV on Friday that he thought Nana Addo should have allowed the elections to be carried out since he believed the timing was wrong.

The former President said the timing was too short, and if he (Nana) had issues with the conduct of the then opposition NDC, he could have raised it after the elections.

He said throughout the elections he campaigned vigorously for Nana Addo with all the sources needed, describing as false, assertions that he led the NPP into opposition.

THIS IS THE CONSTITUTIONAL COUP NANA ADDO WANTED TO PERPETUA

TE ON GHANANIANS THAT JAK REFERRED TO IN HIS INTERVIEW WITH FT

FT: Even so, people looking at Ghana, might be worried that the system has become vindictive, that the two main parties are fairly evenly split structurally but venomously opposed to each other not so much on issues but as a result of personalities.

JK: We needn’t be so split. And truly I was hoping my tenure would be like a watershed divide from the earlier politics of coups, vindictiveness and confiscation of assets and detentions without trial. In my time during 8 years none of these things happened. When my term ended, and the votes were declared by the electorate, I obeyed. Even with some of my people questioning. But I said that was the constitution. If anyone felt aggrieved let them go to court.

FT: Some people say this was because you preferred the idea of Professor Mills taking over than your own party candidate, Nana Akuffo Addo?

JK: No. That is far from the truth. I did everything to support my candidate. But at the end of the day the electoral commission declared for Professor Mills so I handed over to Mills. You perhaps don’t want to remember but even before the third round of votes, I felt forced to make a statement that whomever the electoral commissioner would declare winner, I would hand over to in January. Is that a person that would subvert his own candidate? I just wanted the constitution to be respected.

FT: Were you worried during that period? Because some of your own supporters have suggested there was the very real threat of a coup during that period.

JK: The coup would have happened if I had ignored the electoral commission and declared an emergency. The time I made that statement we had only about ten days or so left to the constitutional deadline for transfer of power. We had gone to do that outstanding election that would have been decisive, to canvass for my candidates. Unfortunately I got there and Kofi Busia’s (former Prime minister 1969-72) family had gone to court seeking a restraint order against the electoral commission.

Suppose I had sided with my side going to court to restrain the electoral commission it would have meant frustrating the electoral commission from holding the election and then we couldn’t have met the constitutional deadline of 7th January. So the only way for me to stay on would have been to declare a state of emergency. And on what basis? So I had to consider the whole thing. Then I said 7th of January I will hand over power to whoever the electoral commission announced. Anyone who felt aggrieved could go to court. So I drove back to Accra a distance of some 100 miles. That’s what happened. The implication was that I would be staging a coup.

[This is an authentic posting from Mr Bean (Registered User)]
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christos christoff
07-10 20:38