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Health News of Monday, 18 June 2018

Source: citinewsroom.com

Johnson & Johnson, Zurak Cancer Foundation to fight prostate cancer in Ghana

Pharmaceutical giant, Johnson & Johnson, has partnered Zurak Cancer Foundation in Ghana to undertake a prostate cancer project across the country.

The project, which involves education and advocacy started on Sunday, June 17, with about 500 men at the Accra Mall.

The awareness campaign formed part of Johnson & Johnson’s corporate social responsibility initiatives, and sought to educate men on the early signs and symptoms of prostate cancer and its prevention.
Education materials such as flyers, were distributed to the men including the Minister of Information, Mustapha Hamid, who was at the Mall.

Aside from the distribution of the educational materials, the staff of Zurak Foundation including its founder, Abdul Samed Zurak, encouraged men to undergo regular checkups to detect and treat cancers early enough.

Mr. Zurak, addressing the media on the sidelines said “the goal of this project is to interact with men and give them much more information about the disease, and also encourage them to screen for the disease which is the most important part of the project.”

He added that “it seeks to also promote our early detection policy by trying to drive screenings and also provide the opportunity for men to be able to screen for the disease in order to ensure early detection.”

About the two organisations

Johnson & Johnson is a New-Jersey-based multi-national manufacturer of pharmaceutical, diagnostic, therapeutic, surgical and biotechnology products, as well as a hygiene company founded in 1886.

It established its Ghana Office in March 2017, and has been sponsoring the Zurak Cancer Foundation with its cancer projects..

The Zurak Cancer Foundation is a policy oriented and service delivery non-governmental organisation (NGO) providing innovative solutions to the cancer prevalence in the country through awareness, education and free screening programs in hard to reach communities.