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Entertainment of Thursday, 5 August 2021

Source: etvghana.com

The world can’t embrace your music if you don’t push it yourself – Smallgod to Ghanaian artistes

Smallgod,  Artiste manager Smallgod, Artiste manager

Smallgod, one of the biggest artiste plugs or connectors in the African music industry, artist manager and Ghanaian Audiomack ambassador cum artiste, has hinted at one of the most effective ways by which Ghanaian music can reach the worldwide audience.

In an interview with Rev. Erskine on YFM’s Mid-Morning Radio Show, he stated that Ghanaians, both artistes and the media, need to own their songs and promote them wholeheartedly so that its reach gets the audience it deserves.

“It’s for us to understand how the music system works outside. We’re trying but we need to put in more work. As they say, charity begins at home so imagine when people come home (Ghana) and want to listen to our songs but turn on the radio and there’s P Diddy or Jorja Smith. What will they take away?” he quizzed.

“You go to the club and they only play two songs from Ghana. What will the travelers take back? If you don’t own your own sound here, how do you expect the world to embrace it? We need to push our own songs here so that the world can also embrace it”, he advised.

Smallgod revealed that in France, there is a policy that makes sure they play eighty to ninety percent French music and dedicate the remaining percentage to worldwide music and he believes that in Ghana, we only play about two percent of local music, however, if we are to adopt such a policy, then Ghanaian music will attain worldwide recognition.

Smallgod’s debut album, “Building Bridges” is his own alternative way of doing what he does best, connecting Africa and the African diaspora through music. The album features artistes like Kwesi Arthur, Tiwa Savage, R2Bees, among other international artistes. He is the go-to guy when you need a collab with any huge artiste in Africa.

Raised between Ghana, London and the Netherlands, Smallgod, also known as Nana Appiasei, became exposed to different cultures and music at an early age and decided five years ago to drop his real estate and pharmacy practice to help promote African music.