You are here: HomeNewsWorld NewsThe Guardian (United Kingdom)
PreviousHeadlines United KingdomNext


Brexit deal: May wins cabinet support but hints at ministers' reservations – Politics live
PM announces she has secured backing for plan after ‘long, detailed and impassioned debate’Full report: May secures cabinet backing for Brexit dealTheresa May’s Brexit deal: everything you need to knowLabour confident its Brexiters will vote down May’s dealLatest summaryMay’s statement in full 10.31pm GMT Sky News’ Political Editor Faisal Islam reporting that Jeremy Corbyn is now in talks with Theresa MayNew: Understand Opposition Leader @jeremycorbyn is meeting the PM now privately in the Commons on Brexit Deal. 10.15pm GMT It looks like anyone staying up for dramatic resignations can turn in for the night after allNo *do* stand down (I think...)! Had heard the Brexit secretary was on the brink, but friends say absolutely not. Let's all reconvene tomorrow, shall we? https://t.co/oOZE8jW3ZJ Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:31:43 GMT)

Brexit deal: key points from the draft withdrawal agreement
Brexiters will find many contentious clauses difficult to stomach within the 585-page draft document The 585-page draft withdrawal agreement negotiated between the European Union and the United Kingdom contains several highly contentious points that supporters of Brexit in particular will find hard to stomach. Here are some of the points that may cause problems for the prime minister, Theresa May, in parliament: Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:08:15 GMT)

Government makes U-turn over delay to £2 FOBT maximum stake
Reduction to take effect in April 2019 after MP rebellion and minister’s resignationA cut in the maximum stake on fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) will be brought forward to April 2019 after the government backed down in the face of a growing rebellion that made allies of MPs across the political spectrum.The chancellor, Philip Hammond, said in the budget that a reduction in FOBT stakes from £100 to £2 would not take effect until October next year, a decision that handed bookmakers a £900m windfall and triggered the resignation of the sports minister, Tracey Crouch. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 14:27:17 GMT)

Impact crater 19 miles wide found beneath Greenland glacier
Crater appears to be result of mile-wide iron meteorite just 12,000 years agoA huge impact crater has been discovered under a half-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet.The enormous bowl-shaped dent appears to be the result of a mile-wide iron meteorite slamming into the island at a speed of 12 miles per second as recently as 12,000 years ago. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:00:12 GMT)

Kweku Adoboli deported to Ghana on flight from Heathrow
Former UBS rogue trader fought deportation having lived in the UK since childhoodThe convicted former UBS trader Kweku Adoboli has been deported from the UK to Ghana, his country of birth, after Home Office officials put him on a flight from Heathrow airport on Wednesday afternoon.Adoboli, who was arrested in Glasgow on Monday when he went to report to the Home Office, was taken to Harmondsworth immigration removal centre on Monday. He was not informed about when and how he would be deported but on Wednesday afternoon he was taken by five escorts to Heathrow airport and was due to be put on a flight at about 5pm to be returned to Ghana, where he has not lived since the age of four. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:06:02 GMT)

Debenhams shares fall by 21%
Department store chain’s sharp decline came after very poor weekly sales Debenhams shares plunged by more than a fifth on Wednesday amid fears for its financial health, as a grim year for some of the high street’s best-known names threatened to get even worse.The 240-year-old department store chain was valued at just £65m by the end of the day, after its shares fell by 21% amid reports that it was now being shunned by suppliers. It was the biggest one-day fall recorded by the retailer for more than a decade. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:26:45 GMT)

Prince Charles is a duchy original, Queen says at birthday dinner
Toast to ‘passionate and creative’ son before family and friends at Buckingham PalaceThe Queen has paid tribute to Prince Charles on his 70th birthday, calling him a “duchy original” and an heir to the throne comparable with any in history.At a Buckingham Palace dinner, the 92-year-old monarch raised a toast to her son and heir before family, friends and members of European royalty. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:00:16 GMT)

Taskforce warns of risk to children from 'county lines' gangs
Professionals and parents warned that children from all backgrounds are at risk of exploitationPolice, teachers and parents should be aware that all children, including those from well-off families, are at risk of grooming by criminal gangs running illegal drugs from cities to rural areas, according to a multi-agency taskforce investigating “county lines” networks.The report into child exploitation and modern slavery by inspectors from four agencies – including police and probation services – said some children drawn into working for criminal gangs were being overlooked, including “affluent children attending public school”, seen as less likely to be identified as drug runners by the police. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:30:03 GMT)

France accuses Trump of lacking 'decency' over angry tweets on Paris attacks anniversary
Macron spokesman says Trump’s attacks on president came as France marked anniversary of Bataclan attacks in which 130 people were killedA French government spokesman has criticised Donald Trump for displaying a lack of “common decency” when he attacked Emmanuel Macron on the anniversary of the 2015 Paris terror attacks. Related: Trump ramps up Macron spat by mocking France in world wars Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:38:46 GMT)

Man charged with murder of schoolgirl Lucy McHugh, 13
Stephen-Alan Nicholson charged with murder and rape of Southampton girl found stabbed to deathA 24-year-old man has been charged with the murder of schoolgirl Lucy McHugh.The body of the 13-year-old was found in woodland at Southampton Sports Centre on 26 July. She had been stabbed to death. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:49:16 GMT)

Woman on trial over child found in squalid car boot in France
Partner and sister of accused say they had no idea she had given birth to fourth childRelatives of a woman who hid her baby in the maggot-infested boot of a car have said they had no idea of her secret, during a trial that has drawn horror in France.Rosa-Maria Da Cruz, 50, is accused of keeping her daughter Séréna hidden away until she was nearly two, leaving her with serious learning disabilities. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:01:16 GMT)

Western lifestyle may cause blood pressure to rise with age
Study of remote communities in Venezuelan rainforest sheds fresh light on hypertensionA western lifestyle might be the reason blood pressure tends to rise with age, according to a study of remote tribal communities.Hypertension is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and in many developed countries, including the UK, the likelihood of developing increases with age. More than a quarter of adults in England have high blood pressure, with recent figures showing the proportion rises to 58% among those aged 65-74. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:00:08 GMT)

The plastics conspiracy: who is to blame for the waste crisis?
The world is waking up to the danger posed by single-use plastics to the environment. But consumer pressure is not enough to reverse the decades of plastic waste that litter the globe and clog up the oceans. Stephen Buranyi tells Anushka Asthana how an anti-plastic revolution is under way but the plastics industry is in no mood for retreat. Plus: George Monbiot on why climate change is a crisis that requires a response of civil disobedienceWho is really to blame for the crisis in plastic waste across the globe? And is it too late to fix it? Stephen Buranyi explains how the rise of the plastics industry since the 1960s created a culture of disposable consumerism that has generated a global crisis of plastic waste. He describes how the industry in response poured money into anti-littering campaigns, but did not apply the same standards of waste control to itself. Plus: the Guardian environment correspondent, Matthew Taylor, explains who is responsible for the “tsunami of plastic” coming our way and what may be our only hope to stop it. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 03:00:04 GMT)

Can Theresa May deliver Brexit?
Once Theresa May brings her Brexit deal to parliament it will face a crucial vote. The Guardian’s political editor Heather Stewart looks across the House of Commons at the warring groups the prime minister will need to win over to seal a deal before the deadline of 29 March 2019. Plus: Caroline Davies on Prince Charles at 70As Brexit negotiations continue in Brussels, the clock is ticking and the deadline for an agreement is looming. But when the dotted line is signed, Theresa May will then have to sell the package to parliament – where she no longer commands a majority. That’s when all hell could break loose as MPs split into ideological groups that don’t necessarily follow traditional party lines. The Guardian’s Heather Stewart describes a febrile atmosphere in parliament as each Brexit tribe attempts to assert its authority, despite none having the numbers to strike a knockout blow. And if parliament can’t agree a deal, Britain could quickly enter a new crisis that could lead to new elections, a second referendum, a new prime minister or a disorderly, chaotic Brexit. The stakes could barely be higher. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 03:00:31 GMT)

The cocaine trade: a global trail of violence – podcast
Anushka Asthana traces the production of cocaine from coca plantations in Colombia with the journalist Joe Parkin Daniels, Adeolu Ogunrombi from the West African Commission on Drugs and the author JS Rafaeli. Plus: Rafael Behr on why we need to look beyond the notion of the ‘will of the people’ if we value democracyCocaine use among Britain’s middle classes has risen in recent years prompting rebukes from police chiefs and politicians and accusations that rising demand is fuelling violent crime.In today’s episode, Anushka Asthana hears from the journalist Joe Parkin Daniels in Bogota, Colombia, where record crops of coca are being harvested and farmers face growing intimidation from armed groups. Continue reading...
(Mon, 12 Nov 2018 03:00:26 GMT)

Becoming by Michelle Obama review – race, marriage and the ugly side of politics
This revealing memoir offers new insights into her upbringing on the south side of Chicago and the highs and lows of life with Barack ObamaBefore I tell you how much I love Michelle Obama, let me tell you what I have against her. The former first lady is a woman capable of muddying your stance on things you stood firmly against. First on the list is the very concept of a first lady. Just think about this. For feminists, or anyone frankly with a 21st-century grasp of gender equality, it is a highly troublesome concept. It is a position that involves a woman – no matter the glorious complexity, glittering accomplishment or human drama of her prior life – being shoehorned into a role that is, by definition, about the man to whom she is married.Her role has never been defined, because, I suspect, to do so would involve the awkward truth – that it’s essentially to make her husband look good. First ladies both feed into, and reflect, our patriarchal values, and so, in this world still so intolerant of female domination, making their husbands look good inevitably involves diminishing themselves, and a decoupling from their own achievements, so as not to outshine the president. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 13:35:13 GMT)

Cars without drivers still need a moral compass. But what kind? | David Edmonds
Humans will soon subcontract their ethical dilemmas to machines. We must be prepared to make some tough choicesLoved by some philosophers, loathed by others, the so-called trolley problem is the quintessential moral puzzle. A runaway train is heading towards five people tied to a track. You can change a signal, diverting the train down a spur, so saving five lives. Unfortunately, one person is on the spur, and would die. What should you do? Most people – young and old, rich and poor – believe you should divert the train.But what if a runaway train is heading towards five people, again tied to the track, and you are standing on a footbridge overlooking it, next to an overweight man? Once again you can save five lives, but only by toppling the heavy-set man over the bridge: he will die, but he is large enough to slow the train to a stop. What should you do? This time, almost everyone agrees that you should not kill one person to save the five lives. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:11:47 GMT)

Ed Sheeran: the man most likely to send us to sleep
A new study on what music we reach for to help us sleep suggests that, along with Mozart, Chopin and Coldplay, Sheeran is a favourite choiceThere is something rather lovely in finding that, as adults, we still choose to send ourselves to sleep with a lullaby – even if it is more likely to be Ed Sheeran’s hit Galway Girl than Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.A new study by researchers at the University of Sheffield, published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, sought to discover how people use music to help them get to sleep. Of the 651 respondents, 62% reported listening to music to drop off, claiming they believed that it stimulated sleep and allowed them to shut out external distractions. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:00:12 GMT)

Robin Robertson wins Goldsmiths prize for innovative fiction with The Long Take
Scottish poet wins £10,000 prize for his ‘narrative poem’ about a D-Day veteran in search of a home in postwar AmericaThe Scottish poet Robin Robertson has won the Goldsmiths prize for the year’s most innovative fiction for his debut novel The Long Take, the story of a D-Day veteran written in a mix of verse and prose.Robertson, who has won many awards for his poetry, turned to fiction to tell the story of Walker, a D-Day veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder who can’t return home to Nova Scotia after the war and searches for a new way of life in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:01:13 GMT)

How Trump's presidency has divided Jewish America
After the Pittsburgh shooting the divide in America’s Jewish community is in ever sharper focus. At the heart of that divide is President TrumpPicture the scene: Michael Peinovich, an American neo-Nazi, stands beneath the Lincoln Memorial in Washington during summer 2017 warning of a “white genocide”. “Who controls the media?” he bellows, call-and-response. “Who controls Hollywood? Who controls Wall Street?” The Jews, the Jews, the Jews. Beside him stands a man with a placard reading: “Jews for Trump”.Next up is white nationalist Richard Spencer: “Remember everyone, see you in Charlottesville.” A month later, many of the same people marched by torchlight, chanting “Jews will not replace us”. After the violence that ensued, the president whose name was on that placard in Washington infamously blamed “both sides”. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 11:00:03 GMT)

Shut out of society, young Londoners talk to UN poverty envoy
Philip Alston hears about overcrowded housing and the lure of crime on his austerity tourA tide of gentrification is rising around the Bollo Brook youth centre in Acton, an area of west London troubled by gang problems and poverty. New flats costing up to £675,000 ring the centre’s temporary cabins, which more new homes will soon sweep away.Unlike at least 81 other youth projects doomed by council cuts in the capital since 2012, the Bollo is not closing for good but will squeeze into a smaller space at the base of one of the new builds. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 15:32:15 GMT)

'More than just a newspaper': Guardian writers thank readers for their support
As we reach the milestone of 1 million supporters globally, our journalists explain how your support has had an impact on their reporting and the real world beyond our pagesTo support The Guardian, please contribute or subscribe todayOne million thank yous to all our wonderful Guardian supporters. Where would we be without you? No, literally: where? You’re the lead in our pencil, the oil in our engine, the wind beneath our … my God, I sound like Boris Johnson. I can’t apologise enough. I will endeavour to continue writing columns that DON’T sound like Boris Johnson – though may sometimes be about him – as long as you will have me.Marina Hyde, Guardian columnistI never cease to be amazed at the loyalty, strength and passion of Guardian supporters and I want to say thank you to each and every one of you. Without your incredible support it would be that much harder to fund the painstaking work of investigations – such as the work we did recently into the treatment of rape survivors in the criminal justice system. Knowing that our readers support our work helped make that series of stories possible, and feedback from our readers gives us the motivation to keep on pushing to find out more and do our part to challenge injustice.Alexandra Topping, senior reporter Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 10:41:42 GMT)

Katharine Viner: 'The Guardian's reader funding model is working. It's inspiring'
The Guardian’s editor-in-chief reflects on the state of media today and explains how the support of 1 million readers has enabled us to report and investigate the most important stories of our time To support The Guardian, please contribute or subscribe todayThree and a half years ago, when I took over as editor-in-chief, we were faced with the urgent challenge of how to make the Guardian sustainable.The situation looked bleak across the media. Print advertising was in steep decline, and digital advertising growth was going almost entirely to Google and Facebook. News organisations everywhere were searching for answers to the challenge that they were being read more than ever before, but with fewer ways to cover costs. Month by month, more and more news outlets went behind a paywall. Continue reading...
(Mon, 12 Nov 2018 09:32:52 GMT)

From Iceland to India: the global community supporting the Guardian
Our interactive map shows the countries where Guardian supporters are, and why some decided to help fund our workTo support the Guardian, please contribute or subscribe todaySince 2015, the number of Guardian supporters has grown to include readers, listeners and viewers from across the world.Thanks to their financial support, we have been able to keep our quality, independent journalism open to everyone, free of charge, wherever they are. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 12:06:10 GMT)

Supporting the Guardian: how to make the most of our website and app
Over one million of our readers have supported us financially, and there are a number of advantages to doing so – including getting closer to our journalists and reducing the number of requests you see on our articlesGuardian supporters help us keep our journalism open for everyone through regular financial contributions, or single payments. By making these contributions, you support the Guardian’s quality journalism and independent voice, which is free from commercial or political interference.We’re keen to help you make the most of theguardian.com and our award-winning app, and also hope you will participate in our journalism, by leaving comments, taking part in our podcast featuring supporters’ voices, or alerting us to a story. Find out more about how to get the most from supporting the Guardian below. Continue reading...
(Fri, 09 Nov 2018 13:12:31 GMT)

Theresa May’s Brexit deal solves nothing: open warfare is about to begin | Polly Toynbee
Number 10 will arm-twist, bribe and cajole MPs. But the prime minister has united her enemies against herAs rumours flew that her Brexiter enemies were calling for her head in no-confidence letters, out she stepped alone. After five gruelling hours convincing her cabinet, a beleaguered prime minister stuck to her friendless deal: sticking is what she does best.Now the arm-twisting, the bribery and the for-the-good-of-the-country cajoling of every last MP begins in earnest. Pinned to the wall, each must finally reveal their true colours; some will be principled, some not: Tories must reckon if the future is with Theresa May and her deal, or with Brextremists in their constituencies. Any Labour would-be defector must reckon whether their local party could ever forgive them for voting to keep this government in power. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:46:27 GMT)

The Guardian view on Theresa May’s deal: reset the debate | Editorial
For too long Brexit has been a matter of conjecture and myth. Now MPs get a glimpse of where Mrs May wants to go for the next two yearsFor years, Eurosceptics complained that EU membership depleted national sovereignty by imposing alien rules without parliament’s consent. That was always a misrepresentation, ignoring the influence that UK politicians and officials exercised in Brussels. But leaving the EU guarantees Britain loses its voice in the room where the rules are written, while still having to implement those rules to gain market access. Brexit engineers the very subordination that was cited as a reason for leaving the club. From what is known of the deal that Theresa May has agreed, it seems the UK will spend at least two years in rule-taking orbit around Brussels. This problem of “vassalage” is not Mrs May’s fault. There was nothing she could have done about an imbalance of power in a negotiation between one country and a continental bloc of 27.During the referendum campaign, Brexiters predicted that continental capitals would yield to pressure from their own exporters, eager to retain access to UK consumers. Pro-leave propagandists never understood the European project. The integrity of the single market and the principle of solidarity between states was more valuable to every member of the union than the bilateral trade with any “third country”. By surrendering its privileges as a member, the UK was never going to “take back control”. On the contrary, Brexit guaranteed that control would bleed away from Westminster, as has been the case since the moment article 50 was triggered. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:34:05 GMT)

Brexit diva Theresa May sings her cabinet encore at last | John Crace
Queen of referendum and blues manages to get her backing group to play the same tuneCall it a stay of execution. Theresa May exists on a different time scale to most ordinary people. While the rest of us try to plan weeks, months – sometimes even years – ahead, the prime minister has a much narrower focus. Minutes, hours and days. Just getting to the end of any given 24-hour period with her job still intact is cause enough for celebration. Even if the cold sweats are sure to begin again at dawn the next day.No wonder then that May seemed relieved – if mentally drained – when she eventually appeared outside Downing Street to give a brief statement. Her Brexit deal, which even she wasn’t sure she fully understood – other than it was better than no deal, worse than what the UK already had and nothing like what she had promised – had survived its first contact with her cabinet. She was still just about in the game. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:24:16 GMT)

Seamus Jennings on Melania Trump's spat with senior aide – cartoon
Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:52:54 GMT)

At 70, Prince Charles has waited long enough. The Queen should step aside | Christina Patterson
He’s fully trained for the job, and it would be a terrible shame to see his mother do it badly nowHe has at least four magnificent homes. He has 134,000 acres. He’s a duke. He’s an earl. He’s a lord. He has a lovely wife, who cheers him up. He has two handsome sons, each of whom has a beautiful wife. He has three grandchildren who adore him. He has an awful lot, this mild-mannered Englishman who turns 70 on Wednesday. Oh, and he has a rich mum. He has a really, really rich mum. I wonder what she’ll give him for his birthday?Since 1976, Prince Charles Philip Arthur George, Prince of Wales, Earl of Chester, Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland, has been helping young people into work. The charity he founded, the Prince’s Trust, has helped more than 900,000 young people into education or employment. But his own apprenticeship has gone on for a very, very, very long time. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:43:00 GMT)

If celebrity victims of climate change can’t silence the deniers, who can?
The California wildfires have shown that even the rich and famous are not immune to climate change – and the authentic response of many of them is a message to us all“Wildfires don’t care about wealth or status,” began the New York Times this week, describing the celebrity homes obliterated by fire in California. But what the report didn’t add, leaving it instead to Neil Young’s website, was that climate change cares even less. As President Trump took time out of his busy schedule protecting his hair and insulting the French to blame poor forest management, Young laid it on the line: “As a matter of fact this is not a forest fire that rages on as I write this. We are vulnerable because of climate change.”In the early stages of the climate crisis, it often felt as if the opposite were true: floods, droughts and heatwaves were always somewhere else’s problem, usually the global south, where they could be chalked up to some pre-existing vulnerability, in a shoulder-shrugging: “OK, so earthquakes aren’t great, but if they’d had better building regulations …” Times moved on. This year, the global heatwave was so pronounced that even habitual climate sceptics – the Sun newspaper, for example – felt moved to point out that the world appeared to be on fire. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:40:40 GMT)

Fifa investigating five Premier League clubs over youth transfers
• Chelsea confirm they are one of the teams under scrutiny • The quintet risk transfer bans if found guiltyFifa is investigating five Premier League clubs over possible violations of rules on the signing of foreign players under the age of 18 with the quintet risking transfer bans if found guilty by the governing body’s disciplinary committee.Chelsea are one of those clubs, as reported by the Guardian in January, and the French investigative website Mediapart reported on Wednesday that Fifa’s Integrity and Compliance unit would seek to impose a two-year transfer ban to stretch across four windows, and a fine of 500,000 Swiss francs. Mediapart is one of the outlets publishing documents obtained by Football Leaks. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:00:16 GMT)

Eddie Jones steps up preparations for Japan by having a sushi night
• Head coach wants to minimise ‘cultural stress’ of World Cup• Jones surprised players with sushi meal on TuesdayEddie Jones has stepped up his efforts to help his squad acclimatise to playing next year’s World Cup in Japan by arranging a sushi night as part of a week designed to prepare England for their first two fixtures of the 2019 tournament.While New Zealand have played two Test matches in Japan this autumn and a number of England’s other rivals including Australia, Ireland and Scotland have visited next year’s host nation since the last World Cup, Jones has failed in his previous attempts to take his squad to the country. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:00:16 GMT)

F1 finally admits concern over woman jailed for Bahrain Grand Prix protests
• Najah Yusuf jailed for three years over 2017 protests• F1 says it is making ongoing enquiries in BahrainFormula One chiefs have admitted for the first time that they are “concerned” that an activist who protested against the Bahrain Grand Prix on Facebook was jailed for three years by the country’s authorities.F1 has traditionally been reluctant to intervene on politics and human rights cases but has made a rare exception in the case of Najah Ahmed Yusuf, who claims she was beaten, sexually abused and imprisoned following a series of posts in April 2017 that were critical of the race and the regime. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:43:00 GMT)

‘Cowardly’ Wada betraying clean athletes over doping, says Robertson
• Accusation made by former chief investigator Jack Robertson• ‘Russia has never admitted guilt, lied and destroyed evidence’The World Anti-Doping Agency has been accused of having a “cowardly” attitude towards Russia and “betraying” clean athletes by the investigator who exposed Russian state-sponsored doping.Jack Robertson, who was Wada’s chief investigator until January 2016, also said the decision by the organisation’s executive committee to reinstate the Russian Anti-Doping Agency in September had “tarnished Wada’s reputation forever”. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:27:00 GMT)

Blow for IOC as Calgary set to be latest city to stop bid for 2026 Winter Olympics
Referendum looks likely to oppose bid for GamesOnly two cities have officially declared for hosting rightsCalgary’s bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics was rebuffed on Tuesday when local voters said “no” in a non-binding referendum. Unofficial results showed that 56% voted against bidding for the Olympics. Results showed that out of 767,734 eligible voters, 304,774 cast ballots and 171,750 of those voted against the Olympic bid.The city council is expected to address the results on Monday, but the bid appears dead. The council has already shown skepticism, with eight of 15 members voting last month to scuttle the public vote. Ten votes were required for the vote not to be held. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:29:11 GMT)

Chelsea to let Gary Cahill leave on loan in January as a reward for his service
•Defender has hardly featured this season under Maurizio Sarri•Cahill helped Chelsea to Champions League glory in 2012Chelsea are to reward their captain, Gary Cahill, for six years of fine service with a loan in January to secure more regular first-team football in a move which will effectively bring the curtain down on his career at Stamford Bridge.The former England centre-half is out of contract next summer and will depart on a free, with Chelsea, who normally insist their players sign new deals before sanctioning a loan in order to protect their value, making an exception for the 32-year-old. That is a reflection of his achievements since joining from Bolton for £7m in January 2012. Cahill, capped 61 times, has won two Premier League titles, an FA Cup, a League Cup, a Champions League and a Europa League over a glittering career at the club. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:40:11 GMT)

Players called for Rooney to captain England and wear No 10 against USA
• Rooney will be given armband when he comes on as substitute• Gareth Southgate says players called for a fitting tributeWayne Rooney will end his glittering England career wearing the No 10 shirt and the captain’s armband against the United States after the squad’s senior players determined that would be the most appropriate way for the side’s record goalscorer to bow out.Gareth Southgate will hand Rooney a second-half cameo in Thursday’s friendly fixture at Wembley, 734 days after he earned his 119th and most recent cap, having described the 33-year-old as the best striker he ever played alongside. The current captain, Harry Kane, who will not start against the US, had led the player delegation championing the returning forward to reclaim the No 10 shirt he wore over much of the second half of his England career. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:30:20 GMT)

Novak Djokovic fears for Davis Cup as rival event crowds tennis calendar
• Serb says World Team Cup will be threat to old competition• Djokovic into semis of ATP Finals with win over ZverevNovak Djokovic, who famously said winning the Davis Cup with Serbia in 2010 changed his career, gave voice day to the widely held but rarely spoken fear that the largest annual international team competition in sport – and one of the oldest – is fighting for its life.On the eve of the ATP launch here of their own World Team Cup in January 2020, Djokovic, the president of the association’s players’ council, said tennis will have to choose sooner rather than later between the new competition and the 118-year-old Davis Cup, which is being re-booted as a round-robin event next November. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:30:49 GMT)

Fight or flight: the veterans at war with PTSD - video
One hundred years on from the end of the first world war, a group of veterans in Dorset are torn between their pride in their military careers and their anger over the lack of psychological support provided to them by the Ministry of Defence. With many feeling abandoned and left to battle significant mental health issues such as PTSD alone, former soldier Andy Price decides to take matters into his own hands, launching the Veteran’s Hub, a peer-to-peer support network for veterans and their families. Over the course of a year, the Guardian’s Richard Sprenger follows Andy on his journey.You can contact the Veterans Hub here.In the UK, contact the Samaritans for free from any telephone on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14.Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org Continue reading...
(Thu, 08 Nov 2018 12:03:26 GMT)

The new green superpower? Oil giant Kazakhstan tries to wean itself off the black stuff – video
Kazakhstan is rich with oil, gas and coal but Nursultan Nazarbayev, its president for life, has committed the country to a dramatic shift from fossil fuels to green energy. Is this huge nation, which is beset by rural poverty, major infrastructure challenges and environmental crises, able to realise his vision? Phoebe Greenwood travels to  the Kazakh capital, Astana, and the Aral Sea regionMany thanks to Kunzberg spatial communications for the use of music from the Future Astana Expo installation Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 10:56:47 GMT)

The climate protesters ready to go to prison for the planet – video
With only 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, according to a UN report, a group of activists called Extinction Rebellion ​have launched a campaign of civil disobedience across London in an attempt to provoke actionToday in Focus podcast: George Monbiot says climate crisis requires civil disobedience Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:12:01 GMT)

La caravana: On the road with the migrant caravan – video
Thousands of migrants from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala head north hoping to find work and a better life in the US. The largest Central American caravan in decades keeps growing as thousands more join this journey – but when they reach Mexico, the migrant caravan starts taking different directions Continue reading...
(Mon, 05 Nov 2018 15:44:03 GMT)

Why we should be paying more for parking – video explainer
Charging more for parking could save the environment, ease congestion and inject energy back into the high street. But how? The Guardian's Peter Walker explains that we've been thinking about parking all wrong: it's not a right, but rather an over-subsidised waste of spaceSources: The High Cost of Free Parking (2011) - Donald Shoup; Psychology of the Car (2017) - Stefan Gössling; Research into the Use and Effectiveness of Maximum Parking Standards - Department of Transport Why forcing cyclists to wear helmets will not save lives – video explainerAfter you: the psychology of queues and how to beat them - video explainer Continue reading...
(Tue, 30 Oct 2018 11:24:43 GMT)

Beto 2020? Why some think Beto O'Rourke has what it takes to become president - video profile
O'Rourke's bid to unseat Ted Cruz in the US midterms narrowly failed – but his audacious grassroots campaign sprinkled seeds of Democratic rebirth and has drawn whispers of a presidential run. What is it that makes people think the Texas congressman has what it takes to get into the White House?Beto 2020? How O'Rourke became a Texas sensation who could shape the future of the Democrats Continue reading...
(Sat, 10 Nov 2018 10:28:25 GMT)

Stacey Abrams v Brian Kemp: inside the bitter battle for Georgia's soul – video
The winner of the midterms race to become governor of Georgia has yet to be declared, with Stacey Abrams, vying to become the first female African American governor, trailing Brian Kemp by just under 100,000 votes. Abrams believes there are still enough ballots left to be counted to take the contest to a runoff. The battle between the Trump-aligned Kemp and the firebrand Democrat Abrams symbolises many of America’s deepest divisions. The Guardian’s Oliver Laughland and Tom Silverstone were in Atlanta in the run-up to the vote to find out what’s at stake Continue reading...
(Thu, 08 Nov 2018 10:23:14 GMT)

Visiting Julian Cole: the man paralysed after being tackled outside a nightclub - video
In 2013 Julian Cole was arrested by six police officers outside a nightclub in Bedford. His neck was broken. He is now paralysed and suffers from severe brain damage. In this film, made in 2016, his mother, Claudia, continues her years of visiting him in a care home twice a day. His friends also drop by. We experience these visits with Claudia and three of Julian’s closest friends, witness the trauma this event has caused in their lives and wait with them as they hold out hope that justice will come from the Independent Police Complaints Commission.In 2018, three police officers were sacked for lying in relation to this incident. Continue reading...
(Thu, 25 Oct 2018 13:09:10 GMT)

'Those horrible pink hats': midterms divide women in era of #MeToo – video
With record numbers of female candidates in the US midterm elections, Paul Lewis travels to New Mexico, where both the Democrat and the Republican standing for a House seat are women. He finds women divided – over Trump, the MeToo movement, and Deb Haaland, a Democrat campaigning to be the first Native American woman elected to Congress'The dirt poor will eat the filthy rich': How a Democrat can win in Trumpland – video Continue reading...
(Fri, 02 Nov 2018 09:37:16 GMT)

Slavoj Žižek tells Owen Jones: 'Clinton is the problem, not Trump' - video
The philosopher Slavoj Žižek says the collapse of the centre-left welfare state consensus has led to the global rise of the new right. He argues the left 'ceased to question the fundamentals of the system' and that the crucial political battleground in the US is within the Democratic partyAn extended version of this video is available on Owen Jones' YouTube channel Continue reading...
(Wed, 24 Oct 2018 12:02:59 GMT)

'Absurd and degrading': how universal credit can ruin lives – video
The government's controversial welfare overhaul has been plagued with difficulties from the outset. Payment delays have left people with mounting debt and facing eviction as demand for food banks soars. Trent from Doncaster tells us how he has been affected Continue reading...
(Wed, 24 Oct 2018 13:01:48 GMT)

Looking for cheap rent? Try a haunted house – video
Comedian Tanishi Matsubara has an unusual system for renting cheaply in Osaka - he seeks out 'stigmatised property': places in which the previous inhabitant has died. In Japan, the belief that such properties are haunted has even led to a law which means potential tenants must be informed Continue reading...
(Wed, 31 Oct 2018 07:00:11 GMT)

'A well kept secret': Mike Leigh on the Peterloo massacre – video
Mike Leigh talks about his new film Peterloo, which tells the story of the 1819 massacre during a rally calling for political reform. The director spoke at the Toronto international film festival as part of the Guardian Tiff Talks seriesJohn Harris: Peterloo shaped modern Britain, as much as any king or queen didMike Leigh's Peterloo: first trailer for film about the notorious massacre Continue reading...
(Thu, 01 Nov 2018 16:19:29 GMT)

Steve Bannon greeted by protesters and scepticism in Edinburgh
Former Trump aide tells audience his populist nationalism is ‘exact opposite of racisim’Steve Bannon, the former Donald Trump strategist, was greeted with protests, scepticism and occasional derisive laughter when he spoke at a European media conference in Edinburgh on Wednesday, where he assured his audience that the populist nationalism he espoused was “the exact opposite of racism”.Scotland’s first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, pulled out of the News Xchange conference, co-hosted by the BBC, last month when she discovered that Bannon was attending, stating that while she believed passionately in free speech she would “not be part of any process that risks legitimising or normalising far-right, racist views.” Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:57:44 GMT)

Police spy should face charges for sexual relationship with activist, court told
Environmental activist tries to overturn CPS decision not to prosecute Jim Boyling for sexual offencesA woman who was deceived into an intimate relationship by an undercover police officer has gone to court to try to compel the state to prosecute him.The environmental activist is one of a number of women deceived into intimate relationships by undercover officers. The Crown Prosecution Service has so far decided not to prosecute any of them. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:02:35 GMT)

Libya says Manchester bomber's brother will be extradited this year
Hashem Abedi was arrested shortly after his older brother killed 22 at Manchester ArenaThe younger brother of the Manchester bomber, Salman Abedi, will be extradited to Britain before the end of the year, according to the Libyan prime minister.Hashem Abedi, 20, was arrested in Libya shortly after his older brother blew himself up at the Manchester Arena on 22 May last year, killing 22 people. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:07:08 GMT)

Birmingham University warned of risk to LGBT rights at Dubai campus
Staff and students say new campus lacks safeguards against strict local lawsStaff and students at the University of Birmingham have warned that LGBT rights are not adequately protected at its new campus in Dubai where being gay or transgender risks imprisonment, flogging and execution.They have called on the university to make clear what safeguards staff and students have in the Gulf emirate given that same-sex behaviour, identifying as transgender, and LGBT advocacy are illegal on the campus, which is classified as a public space subject to Dubai laws. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 15:19:28 GMT)

Judges get counselling because of 'relentless' stream of serious cases
Stress management and resilience sessions available to help with low moraleJudges are receiving therapeutic support from psychologists because of the strains of their workload, the number of sexual abuse cases they have to hear and threats made against them, the lord chief justice has revealed.In his annual report, Lord Burnett of Maldon says “low morale” among the judiciary is also due to “poor physical working conditions” and unsatisfactory levels of pay and pensions. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:24:18 GMT)

Bristol plans to become carbon neutral by 2030
Decision gives city the most ambitious emissions targets of UK’s core cities groupBristol has declared a “climate emergency”, with the council unanimously backing a commitment to be carbon neutral by 2030 in an effort to avoid catastrophic climate breakdown.The motion put forward by Green party councillor Carla Denyer and passed on Tuesday means the city has the most ambitious emissions targets of the UK’s core cities group – with radical policy implications in the coming years. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:00:05 GMT)

Sark's electricity provider threatens to cut power to island
Dispute over tariff means government may be forced to evacuate island’s residentsThe tiny Channel Island of Sark promotes itself as a retreat from the bright lights and noise of the city but it could be about to become much darker and a lot quieter after its sole electricity provider threatened to pull the plug.Sark Electricity Ltd, which has powered the island for decades, has said it will be forced to cut the supply on 30 November after a bitter dispute with the authorities over its pricing system. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:08:37 GMT)

Laura Mitchell loses appeal against Andrew Ayres murder conviction
Court of appeal’s judgment criticised by campaigners seeking changes to ‘joint enterprise’ rulesA trainee midwife sentenced to life imprisonment for murder, who claimed she was looking for her shoes in a car park when the fatal attack occurred outside a Bradford pub, has failed to overturn her conviction.The court of appeal’s ruling in the test case of Laura Mitchell was greeted with dismay by supporters who have been campaigning for changes to the controversial “joint enterprise” rules. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:58:05 GMT)

Zimbabwean generals deny soldiers shot civilians during election unrest
Commanders tell inquiry their troops were not responsible for death of six people in HarareSenior military commanders in Zimbabwe have denied their men were responsible for the shooting of six people in Harare just days after the country’s historic election in August.The killings caused significant political difficulties for the government of Emmerson Mnangagwa. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:35:58 GMT)

Photo of new House members shows big gap in diversity between parties
Proportion of Democrats who are white men will drop from 41% to 38% while Republican figure will climb from 86% to 90%Pictures of the newly elected members of the House of Representatives have highlighted a stark difference between the diversity of incoming Democrats and incoming Republicans.The 2018 midterm elections helped Democrats elect a diverse class of incoming members but the losses suffered by Republicans made their House caucus even more white and male. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:13:57 GMT)

Climate change is making hurricanes even more destructive, research finds
Hurricane rainfall could increase by a third and wind speeds boosted by up to 25 knots if global warming continuesClimate change worsened the most destructive hurricanes of recent years, including Katrina, Irma and Maria, by intensifying rainfall by as much as 10%, new research has found. Related: 'It's hyped up': climate change skeptics in the path of Hurricane Florence Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:00:10 GMT)

Jim Mattis defends deployment of US troops to Mexico border
Defense secretary said move was ‘absolutely legal’ and a ‘moral and ethical’ mission despite critics calling it a political stunt US defense secretary Jim Mattis has defended the deployment of thousands of troops to the border, despite persistent condemnation of the move which critics have described as a political stunt. Related: US toughens border as first members of migrant caravan reach Tijuana Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:30:45 GMT)

Israeli defence chief Avigdor Lieberman quits over Gaza truce
Lieberman says Egyptian-mediated ceasefire with Hamas is ‘a capitulation to terror’Israel’s hawkish defence minister, Avigdor Lieberman, has announced he is resigning from the rightwing coalition government led by Benjamin Netanyahu in protest at a Gaza truce.Announcing his decision, Lieberman called Tuesday’s Egyptian-mediated deal with the Palestinian militant group Hamas “a capitulation to terror” and called for elections. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 14:14:40 GMT)

Eight-legged bus is caught trying to cross vehicle-only bridge in Russia – video
The plan by a group of men to cross the Golden Bridge in Vladivostok is foiled by a security guard who notices something amiss. The 1.4km-long bridge, which opened in 2012, is the quickest route to the city centre Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:09:56 GMT)

California wildfires: death toll at 50 as sheriff releases names of missing
Thousands are displaced and the danger from fires in the state’s north and south is ‘far from over’ The statewide death toll in California’s wildfires reached 50 late on Tuesday, as authorities reported six more deaths in the Camp fire in the north of the state.The deaths from the Camp fire, the deadliest wildfire in the state’s history, have increased to 48, the Butte county sheriff, Kory Honea, said. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:39:45 GMT)

El Chapo trial: judge rebukes defense attorney over opening statement
Judge said Jeffrey Lichtman went ‘far afield’ of proof after he accused two Mexican presidents of taking bribes in statementA US judge has admonished the lawyer for drug smuggler Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán over his opening statement in which he accused two Mexican presidents of taking bribes. Related: El Chapo: trial of Mexican cartel boss begins in New York Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:08:25 GMT)

From the human eye to Hubble: a brief history of our quest for better vision
Technology today enables us to ‘look’ millions of light years across the universe, but up until 400 years ago we didn’t even have telescopes. The scientific search for ways to improve our sense of sight is truly inspiring Continue reading...
(Thu, 13 Sep 2018 14:13:45 GMT)

Road safety: why we underestimate hazards – and how to spot danger
When it comes to our perception of modern-day traffic threats, our brains are still operating in primeval savannah mode. So how can we improve our focus – and to what extent can technology help?Do you see yourself as a bit of a risk-taker? Are you living on the edge, using your wits and wisdom to survive in this harum-scarum world? Or are you cautious and prudent, playing the long game, buying low and selling high? It’s a continuum obviously, and we’re all somewhere on it. You probably think you know where you sit and you’d be so, so wrong – because you almost certainly haven’t got a clue. How could you? You’re human. You’re hard-wired to detect snakes and spiders – all primates have some fear of both and detect them rapidly – but everything else is a mess, especially when it comes to driving a car. Continue reading...
(Mon, 24 Sep 2018 16:19:27 GMT)

The auto innovations driving one of today’s most technologically advanced cars
Volkswagen’s new Touareg is packed with futuristic driving aids, including everything from night vision to an infotainment system controlled by gestures – and some models can even give you a massage Continue reading...
(Tue, 16 Oct 2018 10:00:42 GMT)

From Snow White to militarised robotic dogs: a history of gesture-capturing technology
Hand movements are thought to be the genesis of human communication, which is why scientists, creatives and designers have been obsessed with capturing human motionBy Stephen Armstrong Continue reading...
(Thu, 13 Sep 2018 14:12:55 GMT)

'A horror story': history of Chernobyl nuclear disaster wins Baillie Gifford prize
Ukrainian author Serhii Plokhy, who grew up downstream from the damaged reactor, wins £30,000 prize for Chernobyl: History of a TragedyA Harvard history professor’s “haunting” account of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, which delves into the “heartbreaking stories of heroism” from the people who helped to prevent the whole of Europe from becoming uninhabitable, has won the £30,000 Baillie Gifford prize for non-fiction.Serhii Plokhy’s Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy opens as a radiation alarm goes off in a power plant in Sweden, and as staff begin to suspect a Soviet accident. It goes on to lay out what led to the worst nuclear disaster in history, telling the stories of the firefighters, scientists, soldiers, engineers and policemen who worked to extinguish the nuclear inferno in Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. One of more than 200 books submitted for the Baillie Gifford prize, it beat a shortlist that also featured Carl Zimmer’s look at the science of inheritance, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh; Stephen R Platt’s history of the first opium war, Imperial Twilight; and Hannah Fry’s exploration of what it means to be human in the age of the machine, Hello World. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 22:15:15 GMT)

Architects: the British rock stars confronting the hell of grief
Just as they became arena-massive, the British metalcore band lost their founder songwriter Tom Searle – twin brother of drummer Dan – to cancer. They explain how the nightmare led to their new albumIn the summer of 2016, Architects were on a winning streak. The Brighton band, founded by twin brothers Tom and Dan Searle in the early 00s, had spent years slogging away on the metal circuit: now, they had two Top 20 albums under their belt, as well as the respect of their peers. Life inside the band, however, was less rosy – in fact, it was nightmarish. Unbeknown to fans, the group’s guitarist and main songwriter, Tom, had spent the past three years suffering from cancer. In August 2016, he died, aged 28.For Dan, devastation came with a sense of duty. He needed to inform the band’s devoted fanbase – none of whom had the faintest idea Tom had been ill. So, against all his instincts, he broke the news in a long and heartrending Facebook update the next day. Posting something so intimate online felt “totally gross”, he remembers, sitting beside Architects frontman Sam Carter in a stifling east London office. “But what do you do? You have to address it, you have to say something”. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 13:43:20 GMT)

Bird Box review – Sandra Bullock's Netflix thriller is a bird-brained mess
Despite some tense moments, this apocalyptic shocker is a disappointingly clunky waste of a star-studded castAt the start of Susanne Bier’s apocalyptic thriller Bird Box, Sandra Bullock’s face fills the screen, daring the camera to break eye contact. Her Mallory is stern and commanding – Bullock’s in drill sergeant mode, not America’s sweetheart – and she doesn’t care about sounding kind. Outside, there are creatures who will kill you with a gaze. The audience never sees them ourselves, but we catch glimpses of their presence: the leaves rustle, the birds squawk and the unlucky victim’s pupils glaze over, turning red and watery as the viewers instantly kill themselves with the closest weapon: a window, a car, a desk – whatever’s handy, bloody and smash-y. Related: On the Basis of Sex review – patchy Ruth Bader Ginsburg biopic Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:02:04 GMT)

Lenny Henry: 'Classical music belongs to us all. Just look at Samuel Coleridge-Taylor'
The performer salutes the black British classical composer whose work inspired him to unpack the stereotypes often associated with the genreI never let myself forget that I’m really lucky in my work to be able to discover so many people and places, and to have the opportunity to bring some of their stories to new audiences. That’s what all of us, as writers, actors and comedians, set out to do – shine a light on new perspectives. So it was fascinating this year to find that one of these stories challenged my own set of stereotypes about classical music.Over the past few months I have been enthralled and captivated by the story of a man from Croydon in south London who died more than 100 years ago and who wrote one of the biggest musical hits of the 20th century. He was a total genius – a bit like Prince, but for late 19th-century London rather than 1980s California – and his name was Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:16:17 GMT)

A Small Place review – Jamaica Kincaid's passionate polemic brought to life
Gate theatre, LondonThis inventive performance of Kincaid’s celebrated 1988 essay has the barbed satire and bold message of the original‘The thing you have always suspected about yourself the minute you become a tourist is true: a tourist is an ugly human being.” So wrote the Antiguan-American writer Jamaica Kincaid in her 1988 polemical essay A Small Place. Her target was the wealthy western consumer travelling to the Caribbean island of her birth but she also took in former British colonial rule and corruption inside the Antiguan government.This staging of Kincaid’s book is so faithful an adaptation that it performs the text in its original and entire form, spoken to the audience with no dialogue between actors. Director Anna Himali Howard underlines, rather than hides, the fact: the opening scene features an unnamed actor (Cherrelle Skeete) reading from the essay by torchlight. She puts the book away when a second actor (Nicola Alexis) joins her, but they narrate every word of the essay together. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 21:00:14 GMT)

Stan Lee was working on a new superhero called Dirt Man, says daughter
JC Lee says the late co-creator of Marvel was helping her develop Dirt Man, after ‘trying to get him to do a character with me my entire life’The late Stan Lee’s daughter has revealed that the comics legend was working on one final superhero before he died: Dirt Man.JC Lee told TMZ that she had been “trying to get [Stan Lee] to do a character with me my entire life”. “We have been working on a character called Dirt Man. The last little angel we’ve got tucked away is called Dirt Man,” she said. “I said, ‘Daddy please, no clatter, no steel, no any of that. Let’s get down and dirty … Let’s do Dirt Man.” Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 14:56:57 GMT)

Are we really in the middle of a global sex recession?
Around the world, younger people seem to be having less sex than was the case 20 years ago. What’s going on?Name: The sex recession.Age: Eighteen to 29 and upwards. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:47:19 GMT)

Testosterone therapy could help tackle depression in men – study
Researchers find improvement in symptoms among men given hormoneTreatment with testosterone could help tackle depression in men, according to a review of studies which found supplements of the hormone appear to improve mood.About 100 million men around the world are thought to have depressive disorders, and almost 17% of men in the UK are thought to have symptoms of depression or anxiety. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:13:19 GMT)

Watermelon 'ham' – the vegan alternative to turkey this Thanksgiving
Think the ‘bleeding’ vegan burger about to hit Tesco shelves is a bold move? How about a brined, smoked watermelon?The announcement this week that Tesco is to stock “bleeding” vegan burgers in UK stores was welcomed as an ingenious move by some but dismissed as a food crime by others. In the latter camp was Guardian columnist Suzanne Moore who wondered why a vegetarian feels the need to replicate animals’ body fluids.For Americans, the only response is “you ain’t seen nothing yet.” US chefs have been experimenting with the concept of “bleeding” plant-based foods for a while. At Ducks Eatery, a brick-lined bistro in New York’s East Village, a prime example is on the menu … Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 13:59:46 GMT)

‘Do people like me?’ Why we ask Google unanswerable questions
From the meaning of life to whether we are good in bed, we expect the search engine to be omnipotentWhat question do you wish Google were able to answer? If the survey commissioned by the TV channel Dave is to be believed, chances are your burning questions are what tomorrow’s winning lottery numbers will be, do aliens exist and what will happen to you when you die.The top 25 questions mostly fall into four categories: conspiracies (Who shot JFK? Did Donald Trump rig the election?); desires for worldly success (Will I ever be rich? What will tomorrow’s winning lottery numbers be?); anxieties (Do people like me? Am I good in bed?); and curiosity about the ultimate questions (What is the meaning of life? Is there a God?). Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:12:27 GMT)

An affordable way to sample white truffles: ice-cream
This gelato is the ‘affordable’ way to sample such a decadent flavour and it’s so rich that one scoop is plentyTruffles are not a regular item on my plate and, at London’s Soho delicatessen Gelupo, I get a reminder why not. They sell top-of-the-range white truffles, sourced from Alba in northern Italy, and they come with a price tag to match their scarcity. The customer queuing in front of me snatches up one of the few remaining pots – 21.2g of the stuff – and the till rings up £69.96. Gulp!But if I could afford to eat truffle every day I surely would, such are its uniquely aromatic and enchanting properties. And it was with people like me in mind that the folk at Gelupo had a brainwave: how can we give people a taste of these truffles without forcing them to remortgage a property? The answer lay in their other area of expertise – gelato. By combining the two, they arrived at white truffle ice-cream. It is, says Richard Crampton-Platt, Gelupo’s operations manager, a way of letting people sample these truffles for the (relatively) affordable price of £4 a scoop. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:00:08 GMT)

'It's changed how I see the world': readers' views on parenthood and being child-free
To coincide with the Maybe Baby podcast, readers reveal why they chose to be parents – or notEvalina, 37: ‘Being a parent is the most intimately emotional relationship’ Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 12:53:35 GMT)

Share your Caribbean highlights for the chance to win a £200 hotel voucher
Send us a tip on affordable experiences in the Caribbean, be they places to stay, activities and attractions, or bars and restaurantsPalm-fringed beaches, rum punch and infectious reggae beats … Carnivals, rainforest and a laid-back vibe … The Caribbean is one of the world’s most alluring holiday destinations, and we want to hear your highlights – especially for those not on an A-lister budget. It might be a cosy guesthouse, a hidden beach, a seafood shack or a wildlife-rich jungle trail.Please be specific about locations, and include prices and websites were appropriate. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 16:19:49 GMT)

Tell us: What impact is private tuition having on education?
We’d like to find out from parents, teachers, students – and tutors about why private tuition is on the rise. Share your experiencesIn recent years there has been a sharp rise in private tutoring of children from infant school to university. Research from the Sutton Trust this year found that more than a quarter of state-educated 11 to 16 year olds in England and Wales pay for private tutoring. The charity, which measures social mobility, found that in London as many as two out of five children had been given private tutoring at some point.It’s not just pupils facing public exams that are being tutored; infant and junior school children are also having private tuition, sometimes from as young as five. And at the other end of the age spectrum, university students are also receiving one-to-one tuition to help with essays and exam revision. Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 14:07:21 GMT)

'He saved my life': readers' memories of Stan Lee
We asked you to share your tributes and memories of the comic book legend. Here’s what some of you saidI was blessed to meet him a few years ago, when I was costuming as Wolverine. At that time, multiple sclerosis had really taken a grip on me, and Stan took the time to step away from his photo shoots, sit me down and have a lovely chat. I’ll never forget, when thanking him for filling my childhood and beyond with tales of such amazing superheroes, he told me that people like me in his words, who put disability aside to help others and push through adversity, “were the true superheroes”. Those words stay with me every day. Bless you Stan for being such inspiration. tachikoma Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 13:15:07 GMT)

Tell us: is your school facing budget cuts?
With banners at some school gates we want to hear what cuts mean and how they are being explained to parents and communityA cursory look at recent headlines speaks of deep problems in school funding in England. Special needs funding is at crisis point, sixth form and FE funding has fallen by a fifth since 2010, children are raising money for their own education and headteachers are using cash for disadvantaged pupils to prop up budgets. Related: School cuts: ‘Children now raise money for their own education’ Continue reading...
(Thu, 20 Sep 2018 11:15:03 GMT)

More than a million readers contribute financially to the Guardian
Business model showing way for journalism to ‘regain its relevance’, says editor-in-chiefSupport the Guardian’s independent journalism. Make a contribution todayMore than a million people worldwide have contributed to the Guardian in the last three years, with 500,000 paying to support the publication on an ongoing basis, according to Guardian News and Media’s editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner.She said the business model was showing a new way for journalism to “regain its relevance, meaning and trusted place in society”. Continue reading...
(Mon, 05 Nov 2018 15:40:35 GMT)

'They didn't give a damn': first footage of Croatian police 'brutality'
Migrants who allegedly suffer savage beatings by state officials call it ‘the game’. But as shocking evidence suggests, attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border is far from mere sportAs screams ring out through the cold night air, Sami, hidden behind bushes, begins to film what he can.“The Croatian police are torturing them. They are breaking people’s bones,’’ Sami whispers into his mobile phone, as the dull thumps of truncheons are heard. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 13:44:35 GMT)

Prince Charles at 70: is this multimillionaire really a role model for frugality?
The heir to the throne insists on patching up his clothes, some of which are nearly 50 years old. Is he a poster-boy for the eco-lobby, or just a bit weird?Name: The Frugal Prince.Age: Roll on drums, playing of the national anthem, general bowing, scraping and curtseying … 70 today! Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:00:09 GMT)

Jonathan Franzen: 'Climate change isn't only reason for bird decline'
‘The two things I love most are novels and birds, and they’re both in trouble,’ says The Corrections author, one of the world’s most famous birdwatchers Birdwatching was once an activity that elicited a sense of mild shame in Jonathan Franzen. The author stalked New York parks with binoculars in hand, rather than on a strap, carefully hiding from view the word “birds” on his field guide. Debonair friends in London recoiled in horror when told of his pastime. Franzen was furtive, almost embarrassed. Now, he is one of the most famous birdwatchers in the world.“I totally let my freak flag fly now,” Franzen says as he scans for birds at a community garden near his home in Santa Cruz, California. His phone has an app that deciphers bird sounds. He travels the world to see recondite species. He has written about birds in essays, op-eds and novels.“I was so socially unsuccessful in my youth and such a pariah in junior high that I really didn’t want to look like a dork,” says Franzen, the 59-year-old author whose best known works include The Corrections and Freedom. “I got over that. The success started to make me think: ‘Hey, it’s not me who’s got the problem.’” Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:37:49 GMT)

Former naturopath and scientist share John Maddox prize
Scientist documenting coral reef decline and whistleblower on alternative therapy industry share awardA scientist who is documenting the devastating decline of the world’s coral reefs and a former naturopath turned whistleblower on the alternative therapy industry have been jointly awarded a prestigious prize for championing science in the face of hostility and legal threats.Prof Terry Hughes, the director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in Australia and a world expert on the Great Barrier Reef, was awarded the John Maddox prize for bringing to the world’s attention the catastrophic coral reef bleaching that has occurred as the world’s oceans have warmed. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 19:00:12 GMT)

How hip-hop is helping young people in Hull find their voice | Clare Horton
A new documentary shows one man’s battle with poverty as he tries to bring rap – and hope – to the city’s most deprived areasTen-year-old Jess Baker (not her real name) stands at a microphone in a tiny recording studio behind a hip-hop clothing shop near Hull city centre. “My brain is all messed up,” she raps, “Music is my passion, it makes me not give up”.Running the sound desk and encouraging her as she raps is Steve Arnott, director of Beats Bus, a project running music and arts workshops for young people in the city, which tackle issues including mental health, bullying and political engagement. “The idea of the Beats Bus first came to me about five years ago,” says Arnott. “There were hip-hop workshops already happening across the city, and I’d started doing workshops for young people. But if you come from a family with no money, parents can’t afford to give their children bus fares every day to come into town.” Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:30:10 GMT)

Can local walking groups help solve urban issues?
Dutch cities are using wijkwandelingen, or neighbourhoods walks, as a hyperlocal way of improving cities, from fixing signs to adding playgrounds “This street sign is crooked,” notes Henny Koot, then stoops down to straighten it.We are in Spoorwijk, a neighbourhood in The Hague. “Spoorwijk is a very special neighbourhood. It’s a green space where children can play safely in the playgrounds, where entrepreneurs from different cultures have set up shop. People care about each other,” explains Koot, who chairs a local community organisation. Spoorwijk may be a caring neighbourhood, but it’s part of Laak, The Hague’s smallest district – as well as one of its poorest and most diverse. The average annual income of its 4,340 residents is €16,300 (£14,225) – about €1,350 (£1,180) a month. In 2017, 67.3% of the inhabitants of Spoorwijk were of non-Dutch background – the majority from Surinam, but also from Turkey and Morocco. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:30:10 GMT)

Winning entries in the Epson Pano Awards 2018 – in pictures
Showcasing the work of panoramic photographers, the ninth annual Epson International Pano Awards received nearly 5,000 entries from 74 countries. Here are some of the highest-placed images Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 17:40:16 GMT)

Richard Young's best photograph: Jerry Hall parties at Annabel's
‘You had to earn your way into the club. But once the celebrities got to know you, they realised you weren’t such a bad old fruit’ I can barely remember when this was taken, one of those glam parties at Annabel’s in the late 1980s, when men had to wear black tie and women had to look absolutely scrumptious to get in. That period was a bit of a blur and Annabel’s was just a vortex.There were a lot of gorgeous women about back then, but for me Jerry Hall sums up the whole decade. I shot her a few times over the years and always found her very warm, very kind, and a lot of fun. She’s giving that smile she can just turn on, while the other woman is It girl and socialite Francesca von Thyssen [now von Habsburg]. Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 16:33:16 GMT)

Climate protest and Michelle Obama on tour: Wednesday's best photos
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 13:43:06 GMT)

Vive la difference! Photo Vogue festival – in pictures
From gender identity to vitiligo, from disabilities to drag queens, a new exhibition called Embracing Diversity explores what it’s like to be different • Part of Photo Vogue festival 2018, 15-18 November at Base Milano in Milan Continue reading...
(Wed, 14 Nov 2018 07:00:10 GMT)

The superheroic story of Stan Lee – in pictures
The comics legend behind such characters as Spider-Man and Black Panther has died at the age of 95. He is celebrated in The Stan Lee Story, a Taschen book with only 1,000 copies available, each signed by the man himself Continue reading...
(Tue, 13 Nov 2018 10:24:12 GMT)

Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2018