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Universal credit behind rising rent arrears and food bank use, 'guinea pig' councils say
Research by Southwark and Croydon councils reveals devastating effect of new benefits systemThe universal credit system is pushing poor tenants deeper into rent arrears and sending food bank referrals soaring, according to a study by two councils that have been guinea pigs for the new regime. Related: Backbench Tories hint at significant universal credit climbdown Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:51:49 GMT)

Revealed: government spent £370,000 losing air pollution legal battles
Exclusive: Freedom of information request reveals ‘disgraceful’ amount of taxpayers’ money used to battle ClientEarth over illegally poor air pollution plansThe government spent £370,000 of taxpayers’ money unsuccessfully fighting court claims that its plans to tackle air pollution were illegally poor, a freedom of information request has revealed.The money was spent battling two actions brought by environmental lawyers ClientEarth and included more than £90,000 in costs paid to the group after it won on both occasions. Critics said the government’s expenditure was “disgraceful” and should have been spent on cutting pollution. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:39:14 GMT)

No 10 refuses to deny May was 'begging for help' over Brexit at dinner with Juncker last week - Politics live
Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including Theresa May’s statement to MPs about Brexit and the EU summitNo 10 lobby briefing - SummaryLunchtime summary 2.28pm BST First and most important it is vital to understand that President Trump has not withdrawn from the JCPOA. He has not junked it.He has continued to waive nuclear-related sanctions against Iran, and having spoken to some of the most influential figures on Capitol Hill – none of them fans of the Iranian regime – I have absolutely no doubt that with determination and courage the JCPOA can be preserved.Labour is no longer just an opposition but a government in waiting. We must be ready to serve our country in the event of an early election.That is why the entire shadow cabinet is stepping up our preparations for government and I have asked Jon Trickett to take the lead in this work.At the moment I am funding myself. I entered this knowing it wasn’t paid. And, if I don’t get any sort of remuneration from this, then we will be selling the home, and so on. 1.57pm BST This is what a European commission spokesman said about the FAZ story about the May/Juncker dinner (see 9.10am and 10.55am) at a briefing earlier.Normally, we do not comment on leaks. But today I will. Some people like to point at us to serve their own political agendas, their own political priorities, or even to undermine our negotiating position.We would appreciate if these people would leave us alone. We have lots of work and no time for gossip. Theresa May seemed anxious to the president of the Commission, despondent and discouraged. A woman who hardly dares trust anybody, but is not ready for an act of liberation either. May’s facial expressions and appearance spoke volumes — that’s how Juncker later described it to his colleagues. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:28:47 GMT)

Russian radio journalist stabbed in neck at her Moscow office
Tatyana Felgenhauer, deputy editor of Ekho Moskvy radio station, in serious but not critical condition after attackA well-known Russian journalist is in hospital after being stabbed in the neck by an intruder at work.Tatyana Felgenhauer, the deputy editor of Ekho Moskvy radio station, was attacked on Monday lunchtime at the station’s studios in central Moscow. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:35:07 GMT)

Roman Polanski accused of sexually assaulting 10-year-old girl in 1975
Marianne Barnard – the fifth woman to make abuse allegations against the film director – claims Polanski molested her during a photoshoot in CaliforniaA Californian artist has accused Roman Polanski of sexually assaulting her when she was 10 years old, the fifth such allegation of abuse made against the director.Marianne Barnard has told the Sun that she was molested by Polanski in 1975, two years before the director fled the US after pleading guilty to statutory rape. The artist claims that the incident took place at a beach in California following a photoshoot where the director asked her to pose naked. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:30:35 GMT)

Ocean acidification is deadly threat to marine life, finds eight-year study
Plastic pollution, overfishing, global warming and increased acidification from burning fossil fuels means oceans are increasingly hostile to marine lifeIf the outlook for marine life was already looking bleak – torrents of plastic that can suffocate and starve fish, overfishing, diverse forms of human pollution that create dead zones, the effects of global warming which is bleaching coral reefs and threatening coldwater species – another threat is quietly adding to the toxic soup.Ocean acidification is progressing rapidly around the world, new research has found, and its combination with the other threats to marine life is proving deadly. Many organisms that could withstand a certain amount of acidification are at risk of losing this adaptive ability owing to pollution from plastics, and the extra stress from global warming. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:54:45 GMT)

Widow of soldier who died in Niger says Trump call made things worse
Myeshia Johnson: ‘I was very angry at the tone of his voice’Trump alleged to have told widow her husband ‘knew what he signed up for’The widow of Sgt La David Johnson said her condolence call with Donald Trump “made me cry even worse”, speaking publicly for the first time on Monday about a call that became a national controversy. Related: Trump digs in over call to soldier's widow: 'I didn't say what the congresswoman said' Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:33:55 GMT)

Public indecency case against Briton dropped by Dubai government
Jamie Harron is freed a day after being sentenced to three months in jail, after intervention by country’s rulerA Scottish man who was prosecuted in Dubai for touching a man’s hip has been freed a day after being sentenced to three months in jail, his supporters have said.Jamie Harron, 27, was told on Monday morning that the case against him had been dropped by special order of the United Arab Emirates prime minister and ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, according to the campaign group Detained in Dubai. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:58:15 GMT)

John McCain takes aim at Donald Trump over Vietnam medical deferment
Arizona senator says it is wrong that some avoided war draft‘The highest-income level found a doctor that would say they had a bone spur’John McCain took another shot at Donald Trump on Sunday night, with an angry reference to Americans who avoided the draft for the Vietnam war. Related: Niger soldier's widow says Trump phone call 'made me cry even worse' Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:35:54 GMT)

UK lobbies for trans rights in UN treaty but allows term ‘pregnant women’
Foreign Office says it has not asked for expression to be swapped for ‘pregnant people’, which some campaigners have called forThe UK government says it has lobbied for the rights of transgender people to be protected in a UN treaty but that it has not objected to use of the term “pregnant women”, as suggested in previous reports. There have been calls by campaigners, backed by the British Medical Association, for the expression “pregnant people” to replace “pregnant women” so that it does not exclude trans or intersex men. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:57:50 GMT)

British diver tells of swimming almost five miles to escape shark
John Craig, originally from Sunderland, was followed by a 4-metre tiger shark while spearfishing in Western AustraliaA British diver has described how he swam four-and-a-half miles for his life after being circled by a 4-metre (13ft) tiger shark off the coast of Australia.John Craig, 34, from Sunderland, said he was spearfishing with a friend near Shark Bay in Western Australia when he got into difficulty and lost sight of his boat. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:28:48 GMT)

How The Good Doctor became the year's biggest new TV hit
The new drama, which stars Freddie Highmore as a surgeon with autism and savant syndrome, has engaged millions of viewers but critics remain skepticalEver since Grey’s Anatomy went haywire and hits like House, Nurse Jackie, and ER completed formidable seasons-long runs, folks have been clamoring for the next great medical procedural. This fall, it seems they got their wish with ABC’s new drama The Good Doctor, created by House’s David Shore and based on a Korean series of the same name. Is The Good Doctor “great”? Well, not exactly, but it does enough to fill the void in a genre that’s always been less about medicine than the often galactic, always dramatic goings-on at our favorite fictitious hospitals. Related: What Netflix comedy Atypical gets right and wrong about autism Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:00:15 GMT)

Hotel guests who complain about rough sleepers spoiling their view can sod off
It’s hard to ignore homeless people as winter descends. Why shouldn’t I give someone who looks half-starved money or food as I’m leaving a supermarket laden with groceries? Until there are policy changes that help, I’ll do what I likeI came out of a meeting one evening last week with some chums, and there was a fellow lying on the pavement in the doorway under his duvet with a couple of bags of possessions. He needed milk for his cereal. So we got him some, plus a bowl, spoon, sugar and a nice hot cup of tea, because it was chilly and starting to drizzle. And we didn’t think he was there as a fun lifestyle choice.Winter is arriving, and here we go again. In the cold, homeless rough sleepers are more troubling to see. So troubling that they quite ruin the view from some London hotels. Guests have been moaning away about the unsightly clusters of homeless humans visible from their windows, so the hotels have been moaning at Camden council, who must now do their best to make the pavements less comfy, and discourage us from giving money, snacks or tents to anyone sodden and freezing on the ground. It only encourages the destitute. To carry on being destitute. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:09:02 GMT)

From latte socialist to gauche caviar – how to spot good-time leftwingers around the world
As Ireland’s taoiseach showed recently, many politicians find it hard to accept that egalitarian types like nice stuff. In fact, there are myriad labels for such peopleWhen Leo Varadkar launched his leadership campaign for Ireland’s ruling party, Fine Gael, earlier this year, he did so with cupcakes and coffee from an establishment that would hold its own against the flat white meccas of Melbourne. But now that he is taoiseach, Varadkar has branded his leftwing critics “latte socialists” – the implication being that if you claim to want to improve the conditions of working people while also enjoying the combination of espresso and steamed milk, you are a hypocrite.It’s a sign of our straitened times, in which wages are falling and inequality is growing, that a product as ubiquitous and relatively affordable as coffee is now the luxury that no good socialist is allowed to enjoy. Even among some politicians who identify as left of centre, coffee has come to be seen as an absurd indulgence. “Bit bizarre hearing these rightwing calls for a ‘Barista Visa’”, tweeted Labour’s Andy Burnham, now the mayor of Manchester, in April. “God forbid the idea of waiting longer in the morning for their posh coffee,” he said, as if the rest of us subsist on pints of lager and pots of tea. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:40:18 GMT)

I produced My Week As a Muslim. Its intention was to educate, not offend | Fozia Khan
Our use of ‘brownface’ is nothing to do with mockery – it’s about opening the eyes of someone who has misconceptions about Muslim lifeThe idea for making the documentary My Week As a Muslim came to me after I spent almost a year in Birmingham, filming a series for Channel 4 called Extremely British Muslims in and around Birmingham Central Mosque.Towards the end of our time there, the Brexit vote happened. Almost immediately, there was an English Defence League demonstration outside a mosque in Birmingham, and the number of attacks on Muslims spiked dramatically. We only managed to capture a small part of this, but in the coming weeks there were reports seemingly every day about hate crime, and articles on Britain’s diverse but divided communities – living parallel lives but not integrating. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:27:49 GMT)

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a giant trevally, Blue Planet’s next box-office monster
David Attenborough’s ocean wildlife series returns to our screen next week – and a gravity-defying, bird-munching superfish could be its biggest starName: Giant trevally.Appearance: Like a bluefin trevally, but larger and without blue fins. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:32:59 GMT)

When good TV goes bad: how Gilmore Girls succumbed to an April fool
What began as a warm, witty and whimsical comedy-drama lost the plot with the clunky introduction of a long-lost lovechild. After that, its clutch of lovable characters never quite found their feet again Related: When good TV goes bad: how House of Cards came tumbling down It’s hard to think of a less transgressive TV show than Gilmore Girls, the gentle comedy-drama about garrulous single mum and inn-keeper Lorelai, her bookworm daughter Rory and their lives in sleepy Stars Hollow. But during its original run, between 2000 and 2007, it felt refreshing, even daring: in an era of moody prestige dramas dominated by dark, difficult male leads, it centred around two witty, well-adjusted women who actually liked each other. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:00:17 GMT)

From Félicette the space cat to Dolly the sheep – which animals should be given a statue?
Campaigners are hoping to build a monument of Félicette, the only cat to survive space travel. But she’s not the only creature deserving of commemoration There is hardly any good news any more, so it was pleasing to hear of a crowdfunding campaign to raise money – £40,000 – for a bronze statue to honour Félicette, the first cat in space. Félicette survived her escapades – the only cat ever to do so – and returned to live in Paris in 1963 as a cause célèbre, nine lives still intact. Laika who? Inspired by this fearless feline, here are some animal peers also deserving of a monument. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:00:18 GMT)

Can Michael Fassbender survive his year of flops?
The Snowman is melting at the box office. It only continues what Assassin’s Creed and Song to Song started, threatening to ruin this actor’s previously sparkling career Related: The Snowman, Yogi Bear and Hollywood's unintentionally funny movie posters The Snowman is a turkey. Everyone saw it coming, and now it’s happened. Audiences simply did not want to see Michael Fassbender play a man called Harry Hole in a film that was released before it was finished and marketed by a drawing of a Snowman who calls everyone “Mister Police”, like some sort of cut-price children’s entertainer. Lessons have been learned and everyone will move on. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:30:56 GMT)

Into the void: the fast life and shocking death of a wingsuit-flying superstar
Alexander Polli was an adrenaline junkie, a daredevil who could fly through holes in rockfaces at 150mph. Our writer tells the extraordinary story of Base, a new film starring Polli that had to be delayed when he was killed by the sport he lovedOne week after his wingsuit-flying partner died, Carlos Briceño Schutte launched himself into the void holding an inflatable pig. The drop from the Aiguille du Midi, the 3,842m peak that towers over the French alpine town of Chamonix, had been one of Alexander Polli’s favourites. It was only right, says Schutte, to fly it in remembrance – accompanied by his friend’s spirit animal. “He was sometimes a little bit fat, not doing much exercise,” says Schutte. “I was like, ‘You’re not an eagle, bro. You’re a pig.’”Polli, who was just 31 when he died last year, was the Jimi Hendrix of wingsuit-flying, the supremely dangerous sport whose elite are revered like rock stars, thanks to the eye-watering feats they perform. Polli, like Schutte, had taught himself by trial and error to use the nylon-webbed suits that allow base-jumpers to ascend to the next terrifying level. Launching themselves from peaks and helicopters, they cut horizontally through the air at speeds that can exceed 200mph, “proximity-flying” just inches from rockfaces and buildings. There is little room for error on such high-octane flights – and none whatsoever on the 2013 stunt with which Polli made his name: threading the needle of a 25ft hole in a rockface in Spain’s Montserrat mountains, an accomplishment unusually extreme even by wingsuit standards. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:11 GMT)

Gunpowder: viewers shocked by violent scenes in BBC drama
Three-part series chronicling plot to blow up the House of Lords in 1605 features Game of Thrones actor Kit HaringtonGunpowder review: it’s Game of Thrones minus dragons plus history The BBC’s new primetime drama, Gunpowder, was described as unnecessarily gruesome and brutal over graphic scenes of violence, which aired minutes after the watershed on Saturday night.The three-part series chronicles the plot to blow up the House of Lords in 1605, with Game of Thrones star Kit Harington playing his ancestor Robert Catesby, the mastermind behind the plot. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:50:15 GMT)

Master of mindfulness, Jon Kabat-Zinn: ‘People are losing their minds. That is what we need to wake up to’
By taking the Buddhism out of the practice, Kabat-Zinn pioneered a meditative approach used all over the world to treat pain and depression. He talks about Trump, ‘McMindfulness’ and how a 10-second vision in 1979 led to a change in the world’s consciousnessThe police in Cambridge, Massachusetts, showed no mercy to Jon Kabat-Zinn in May 1970. The man now considered the godfather of modern mindfulness was a graduate student from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and an anti-Vietnam-war protester, agitating alongside the Black Panthers and the French playwright Jean Genet.“I got my entire face battered in,” he recalls. “They put this instrument on my wrist called the claw, which they tightened to generate enormous amounts of pain without leaving any marks. But they certainly left a lot of marks on my face. They pulled me into the back of the police station and beat the shit out of me.” Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 14:00:07 GMT)

As #MeToo takes off, don’t let the right define misogyny | Zoe Williams
After Weinstein, calling out sexism has gone mainstream. But as the Clive Lewis affair shows, this throws up new ethical dilemmas for feminists on the leftThe unmasking of Harvey Weinstein was like the breaching of a dam, against which decades of abuse, outrage, injustice, rumour, shameful complicity of employees, and unwarranted shame from victims had built. The awesome power of its bursting has already completely changed the territory, obliterating not just Weinstein’s nefarious power but all the assumptions and understandings by which a woman’s discretion was ensured. Related: #MeToo named the victims. Now, let's list the perpetrators | Jessica Valenti Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:04:56 GMT)

Moomins and more: UK show to exhibit Tove Jansson's broader work
Britain’s first major retrospective of Finnish artist, at Dulwich Picture Gallery, aims to enhance her reputation as serious artistHalfway through the first major UK retrospective of paintings by Tove Jansson, which opens this week at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, visitors will recognise some little blobby creatures in a glass case – the Moomins. The stars of some of the most famous children’s books of the 20th century, they have become deeply familiar in their incarnations as fridge magnets, soft toys, on the tail fins of Finnish planes and in a newly opened museum in Finland. They have also appeared in cartoon strips and animations, with a new film coming at Christmas and a new animated series promised in 2019 featuring the likes of Kate Winslet, Rosamund Pike and Will Self. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 15:02:22 GMT)

Conspiracy theorists – in the Oval Office and out of it – await release of JFK files
Kennedy assassination documents are set to be released on Thursday. Experts’ weary testimony cannot dampen the ardor of those who say Oswald didn’t do it“What happened in the window is not true,” said Ron Washington, holding a magazine containing grisly autopsy photographs of the 35th president of the United States. “It was only a decoy. Here’s the evidence.” Related: Trump does not plan to block release of JFK assassination documents Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:50:42 GMT)

Ronald Koeman sacked by Everton after disastrous start to season
• Koeman leaves with club in bottom three of Premier League• Everton spent heavily in the transfer window this summerRonald Koeman has been sacked by Everton following a dismal run that has left the club third from bottom of the Premier League.The Dutchman was hired on a £6m-a-year contract in June 2016 and led Everton to a seventh-placed finish in his only full season in charge. However, following an investment of almost £140m in players this summer, Everton’s form has nosedived. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:39:11 GMT)

European Champions Cup’s opening results expose tournament’s black hole
Brave new Europe sees ferocity on the field but ruthlessness away from it is putting game in danger, and not just for the Welsh, Scottish or ItaliansIf the loss of a team’s opening two games in Europe is enough to consign their hopes of progress to dust – and it almost always is – then this season’s champions will come from England, France or Ireland. “What’s new?” cynics might ask. “We’ve always known that.” And they would be right. But there is something to be said for hoping, at least, that a Welsh, Scottish or Italian side might make the quarter-finals.There is no such hope this time. When the Ospreys’ exhilarating attempt to storm fortress Barnet fell three points shy of victory against Saracens on Saturday night, attention resignedly turned to the usual suspects. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:00:16 GMT)

Selfish Neymar and his arrogant PSG team-mates offered a lesson in Marseille
An injury-time free-kick from Edinson Cavani rescued a point for PSG, but Unai Emery’s players need to wake up and show their Ligue 1 opponents some respectBy Adam White and Eric Devin for Get French Football News“I couldn’t tell you a name of a single Marseille player,” said Dani Alves before Sunday night’s classique. Paris Saint-Germain players have long been a cliquey, ego-driven and even smug group, but their collective cockiness has begun to overflow since the summer. As France’s premier domestic fixture approached, the Paris half of Ligue 1’s most famous rivalry seemed uninterested. As Thomas Meunier put it, French football’s showpiece was “nothing special”.When Neymar and Kylian Mbappé arrived in the summer, it was difficult to see how other French clubs would stop them from disappearing over the horizon with every domestic honour going. The only problem is that Unai Emery’s players also seem to believe that and, in recent weeks, this assumption has noticeably affected their displays. As a smirking Neymar trudged from the Vélodrome pitch, having been sent off with his side trailing 2-1 to Marseille, it seemed as if that arrogance had finally taken over. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:38:34 GMT)

Leonardo Bonucci's Milan move goes from bad to worse after red card | Paolo Bandini
The defender’s transfer from Juve was supposed to be a sign of Milan’s title ambition but the club and their new captain have struggled to hit it offHow did Leonardo Bonucci end up at Milan? The question has been asked countless times over the past three months, and always one image springs to mind: that of the defender sat with a glum expression, watching Juventus’s Champions League win away at Porto from a directors’ box. He had been dropped from the starting XI after a row with Massimiliano Allegri. Their relationship never fully healed.And how is Leonardo Bonucci getting on at Milan? We might now answer that question with a very similar photograph. As the Rossoneri began the second-half of their game against Genoa on Sunday, TV cameras cut to one of San Siro’s executive suites. There they found Bonucci, wearing a black shirt just like he had done in Portugal – and a melancholy mood to match. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:09:38 GMT)

Premier League: 10 talking points from the weekend’s action
Arsène Wenger must continue with golden front trio; Christopher Schindler was a great buy for Huddersfield; Manchester City defence is as key as their attackThis was the first time Arsène Wenger had started Mesut Özil, Alexandre Lacazette and Alexis Sánchez in his XI. Yet until Everton went down to 10 men Arsenal were hardly a goal machine, having struggled to a 2-1 lead when Idrissa Gueye was sent off. At this point Özil was on the scoresheet, and by the final whistle Lacazette and Sánchez had also registered. Wenger, of course, cannot rely on the opposition having a man getting his marching orders every game. But even before this happened there was cause for optimism: Sánchez created Özil’s strike while Lacazette, on occasion, provide a focal point for the Chilean and German. Everton are in freefall so a better test of how effective this trio can be will come when Arsenal visit Manchester City on 5 November. Wenger surely must trust them to start or any chance of beating City in their own backyard will be seriously reduced. Jamie Jackson Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:18:43 GMT)

Entertaining Dortmund give goose bumps but defensive frailties a concern
Peter Bosz’s side let slip a 2-0 lead at Frankfurt as injuries and suspensions hit the backline in a Bundesliga season that is opening up into a three-way fightAfter Borussia Dortmund threw away a two-goal lead at Eintracht Frankfurt and were forced to settle for a draw, the journey home proved pretty memorable, too. With the motorway closed, and the team coach and fans alike stuck in traffic, near the town of Haiger, two dozen or so supporters took it on themselves to serenade the stationary team bus with an impromptu rendition of You’ll Never Walk Alone. Gänsehaut – goose bumps, Dortmund said. Following Die Schwarzgelben is rarely dull.There was the entertaining heavy metal football under Jürgen Klopp, they scored goals for fun under Thomas Tuchel and while Dortmund remain a work in progress under Peter Bosz, they are yet to surrender the ingredient that makes them so affable and entertaining: their full-throttle approach in the opposition half. More often than not it makes for entertaining fare. “It could have ended up 4-4 or 5-5,” Lukas Hradecky, the Frankfurt goalkeeper said. However, Dortmund’s defensive frailties should be of concern to Bosz. As he said after the 2-2 draw: “You must win the game” with a two-goal cushion. This was the first time they had failed to win a Bundesliga match after opening up a 2-0 lead since November 2014, in Paderborn. “One point is not our target when we come to Frankfurt,” Neven Subotic said. The flipside is that you could argue this result displayed some form of improvement, given Dortmund had been defeated on their three previous league visits to the Commerzbank Arena. They also remain the only undefeated away team in the Bundesliga. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:31:40 GMT)

The 'Ali summit': a turning point in sports' fight against injustice
In 1967, athletes put their weight behind Muhammad Ali after he refused to be drafted. Fifty years later, NFL players are again taking a political standIn 1962, as a cornerback for the American Football League’s Boston Patriots, Walter Beach rallied his fellow black players – there were about five – for a discussion.The topic was what to do about a forthcoming exhibition game against the Houston Oilers that was scheduled to be played in New Orleans. As was custom and law in most of the south at the time, the team accommodations were to be segregated. Promoters planned to house the black players from both teams at a black-owned motel, and white players from both teams at a hotel two miles away. “We were all in agreement that we didn’t want to participate in it,” Beach said. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:00:16 GMT)

Golden Boy 2017: Kylian Mbappé beats Dembélé and Rashford to award
• Mbappé, 18, named Europe’s best player under the age of 21• Had breakthrough year at Monaco before joining PSG on loanThe France forward Kylian Mbappé has won the Golden Boy award for the best young player in Europe, fending off competition from Barcelona’s Ousmane Dembélé and Manchester United’s Marcus Rashford.The 18-year-old came to prominence last season, scoring six Champions League goals to propel Monaco to the semi-finals while playing a huge part in the club’s title-winning Ligue 1 season, scoring 15 goals from an often wide berth. Mbappé is on loan at PSG, where he has scored four goals and made four assists in 11 games. He will make the move permanent in a £166m transfer next summer. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:29:30 GMT)

Lewis Hamilton’s dominance should lead to F1 endgame in Mexico | Giles Richards
The Briton was peerless throughout the weekend in Texas and his wait to become Britain’s most successful driver has surely been delayed only one weekUltimately then, after opening with a pre-race ceremony of razzmatazz and showbiz theatrics, the US Grand Prix was not to be the stage on which Lewis Hamilton delivered the dramatic finale of claiming his fourth Formula One world championship. The win he had looked like delivering all weekend was duly secured but Sebastian Vettel taking second place has ensured their title fight will go to the next round in Mexico.Yet Hamilton has as good as claimed the crown with a drive of verve, composure and dominance that he has delivered so often this season. Not content to settle for second as he could have done after he had lost a place to Vettel off the grid, he attacked again for the lead, took it and held it. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 21:33:39 GMT)

Baseball no longer a supergiant but it is still the most American of sports
The World Series does not consume the US as it once did. But baseball still offers a window on the best and the worst of AmericaBaseball has long seen itself as America’s game, a game as great-hearted, humble and fundamentally decent as America itself. And for the better part of the 20th-century, at least in terms of the game’s popularity, baseball was indeed America’s game, and its biggest stars were famous in a way that athletes simply aren’t famous anymore. Fans in the 1920s traveled hundreds of miles just to see Babe Ruth, and the New York Daily News hired a journalist to write about Ruth, and only Ruth, 365 days a year. The most famous players of later eras – like Ruth, they tended to be Yankees – became not just athletic icons but national figures of myth. That they tended to be human in all the familiar unflattering ways – Joe DiMaggio was an icy, exploitive jerk; Mickey Mantle a self-destructive alcoholic for much of his life – was never allowed to jeopardize the legend. In an era before television ratings, the World Series was not just the nation’s most popular sporting event, but something like a national holiday.This hasn’t been the case for some time, and this year’s World Series – which starts on Tuesday and features one of the country’s most famous teams, the Los Angeles Dodgers, against the Houston Astros – is unlikely to change matters. The NFL, in all its Trump-ian shamelessness, has been the most popular league in the United States for more than a decade. The NBA, which has the youngest and most diverse fanbase of the major US sports leagues – it has the highest TV viewership among African Americans and the second-highest among Hispanics – seems to have a more credible claim on the future. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:00:13 GMT)

Three seriously hurt and 120 detained in riot after Club Brugge v Antwerp match
• Fans from Netherlands joined in brawl between Belgian hooligans• One policeman among the seriously wounded Related: Everton give life ban to child-holding fan who attacked Lyon player Authorities are investigating a riot that seriously injured three people and forced police to detain 120 others following Club Brugge’s 1-0 win against Antwerp. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:28:06 GMT)

Sean O’Loughlin: ‘The hunger is there to go and win the whole thing’
England’s captain says the team are aiming high in Australia and know an opening victory over the Kangaroos on Friday would ease their path to the Rugby League World Cup finalSean O’Loughlin still remembers the events of 5 November 2006 as if it were yesterday. As a fresh-faced 23-year-old Great Britain international, O’Loughlin would have been forgiven for not caring if that night, his first taste of victory against Australia in a 23-12 Tri Nations win in Sydney, would be his last. “Seeing grown men bash each other like that, you don’t forget that,” the England captain says with a laugh. How could you forget it? Whether it was Willie Mason’s “bashing” of Sean Long and Stuart Fielden, Long’s heroics at half-back or the zenith of Gareth Raynor’s career in scoring the match-clinching try, it is not difficult to recall the events of the first British victory on Australian soil since 1992.But for O’Loughlin, and the sport’s followers, the euphoria still attached to that night is what is essentially the problem for British rugby league. Now 34 and preparing to lead England in his final World Cup, O’Loughlin is still waiting to remember what it feels like to beat the Aussies again. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:00:14 GMT)

Dejan Lovren and Liverpool introduce us to the art of un-defending | Barney Ronay
Liverpool’s Croatian centre-back produced the worst half-hour on the pitch in recent memory, during which he appeared to have completely forgotten he was actually playing in a football match, in the 4-1 hammering by TottenhamThe humane thing to do, looking back on this exhilaratingly open 4-1 Wembley victory for Tottenham Hotspur against Liverpool, would be to focus on the ruthlessness of Harry Kane, the brutal speed of Spurs’ counterattack, the running of Son Heung-min.Things are rarely that easy, though. In Germany they have a concept called Ruinenlust, which describes the irresistible pleasure of seeing a deeply distressed object in the process of falling to pieces. And for half an hour here Liverpool provided something similar as Jürgen Klopp’s team produced collectively one of the worst displays of elite-club defending the Premier League will see this season; and individually a candidate for worst half-hour on the pitch in recent memory. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:34:34 GMT)

Ronald Koeman’s lack of vision clear from Everton’s fall to disjointed Arsenal | Jamie Jackson
Both teams lurched from one disjointed moment to the next at Goodison Park and Everton’s 5-2 defeat will damage the Dutchman’s long-term job prospectsThis curiosity of a contest said everything about these two teams’ current travails. It pitted one in serious crisis – Everton – against one always seemingly near to the next – Arsenal. An odd sense of elite professionals muddling through prevailed until Idrissa Gueye was sent off on 68 minutes and the Gunners pulled away.Before then Everton and Arsenal had each suffered from an absence of stability and clearness of vision. Instead the players lurched from one disjointed moment to the next. The Gunners began like the proverbial train that suggested a seventh defeat in 11 matches would be Everton’s fate. Then they did an “Arsenal” by allowing their confidence-low opposition to take the lead, via a fine Wayne Rooney strike. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 23:01:04 GMT)

China ‘compulsorily doped’ athletes in 1980s and 90s, claims whistleblower
• Former China Olympic doctor alleges systematic doping in all sports• ‘More than 10,000 athletes’ were affected, says Xue YinxianA former doctor for the Chinese Olympic team has revealed that more than 10,000 of the country’s athletes were involved in a systematic doping programme across all sports – and that every one of China’s medals in major tournaments in the 1980s and 90s came from performance‑enhancing drugs.Xue Yinxian, a 79-year-old Chinese whistleblower who is seeking political asylum in Germany, also claimed that athletes aged as young as 11 were introduced to the compulsory doping scheme – which existed in football, athletics, swimming, volleyball, basketball, table tennis, diving, gymnastics and weightlifting – and that anyone who spoke against the system now sits in jail. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 20:06:06 GMT)

Chris Gayle defamation trial hears cricketer 'devastated' by Fairfax claims
Gayle says allegations by the Age newspaper that he exposed himself are false and he has never been more hurt in his life Cricketer Chris Gayle has told a Sydney court he was devastated when he read a headline in the Age newspaper saying he had exposed his genitals to a female masseuse in the dressing room.On day one of a defamation trial against Fairfax Media, Gayle said the incident reported on never happened and was false. Gayle said the story had travelled all over the cricketing world. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 03:26:07 GMT)

Corbyn’s meetings with EU leaders shows Labour as the Brexit grownup | Rachel Shabi
With the Tories riven by infighting, the Labour leader has been forging links with other parties in Europe to make sure the UK gets the best Brexit deal possibleFinally, we have something Brexit-related to agree on: most of us, regardless of how we voted in the referendum, think negotiations with the EU are going badly. According to a poll published on Friday, only 1% think talks are proceeding “very well” and 11% say things are going “quite well”. None of which is good news for anyone who lives in the UK and has to live with the catastrophic consequences of botched negotiations. But the sorry state of these vital talks has given the Labour party scope to vaunt some EU-related credentials, as Jeremy Corbyn met Michel Barnier and three European prime ministers in Brussels last week. The party is routinely blasted by British commentators of all stripes for being too weak, too vague, or too Brexity on Brexit – which makes the positive reception it gets in mainland Europe all the more striking in contrast. Related: Brexit deal: Johnson says now is time for EU leaders to ‘get on with it' Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:20:41 GMT)

Toxic masculinity is everywhere. It’s up to us men to fix this | Jordan Stephens
I admit I’ve abused my power in the past. Only by confronting our privilege and opening up our emotions will we live a more positive life• Jordan Stephens is one half of hip-hop duo Rizzle KicksThe past two weeks have reminded us of the extent to which women suffer at the hands of the patriarchy. As women share their stories and many nod along, what about us men?Any man who has read a woman’s account of harassment or assault and thought “that doesn’t apply to me”: what you’re experiencing in that moment is the exact privilege, power and entitlement that women are finding space to battle against. We have subconsciously benefitted since we were born from patriarchal privilege – in many ways it’s invisible to us. I’ve been outspoken in my support for women’s rights, but I’m not afraid to admit that I’ve fallen foul of the patriarchy’s malicious hardwiring. But in confronting it, rather than continuing to abuse my power, I’ve found more inner peace, understanding, love and truth then I ever could have done had I continued as I was. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:59:12 GMT)

​This was not 'just another bomb in Mogadishu’. It will destroy al-Shabaab | Abdirahman Omar Osman 'Engineer Yarisow'
With more than 350 people killed in this deadly attack, it is time for we Somalis to unite against violent extremism, says the country’s minister of information At 3.20 on the afternoon of Saturday 14 October, al-Shabaab detonated a massive truck bomb at a busy junction on the road into Mogadishu, known as KM5. The truck, which had been driven in from the outskirts of the city that day, was packed with 400kg of mixed explosives, including military-grade but also the homemade-from-fertiliser type. The truck had been spotted by security forces at a checkpoint but had crashed through the barrier and sped along the road to KM5. The area is always busy, jammed with hotels and shops, but at that time it was genuinely bustling; school had finished and it was just before afternoon prayers. The truck bomb went off beside a fuel tanker and the resultant carnage flattened the area for hundreds of metres around. But you wouldn’t know it now, as the reconstruction effort has moved apace to erase signs of the atrocity. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:58:48 GMT)

Air pollution is killing us. As a GP I welcome this new charge on drivers | Chris Griffiths
From today the most polluting vehicles on London roads will face a ‘toxicity’ fee. It’s a vital first step towards cleaning up the UK’s dangerously dirty airA report released last week by international experts shows pollution to have caused more deaths in the UK than in many other countries in western Europe. Air pollution is largely invisible, so it is hard to grasp how much damage it is doing to our health. But studies like the Lancet commission on pollution make it clear that poor air quality increases not only the likelihood of developing a range of respiratory illnesses, but also the frequency and severity of bouts of those illnesses.Like many GPs, I see this “double hit” in the children and adolescents who come to surgery every day. Preschool children who live near main roads have an increased risk of developing wheeze triggered by viral colds – a condition we call “preschool wheeze”. Exposure to traffic pollution also increases the chance of a child developing asthma. For preschool wheezers and children with asthma, high pollution days can then trigger episodes of severe wheezing, especially when pollution has not been dispersed by the wind. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:19:56 GMT)

If greedy bosses have broken capitalism, who will fix it? | Hugh Muir
Don’t be fooled: corporations can’t be relied on to reset the economy. Capitalism needs more regulation and stronger unionsThought for the day comes from the book of Luke: “There will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over 99 righteous ones who do not need to repent.” Might we place in the repenting category the UK boss of bankers Santander, the former chairs of Marks & Spencer and HSBC, and the heads of the Confederation of British Industry, Barclays and Lloyds? Related: The problem is not capitalism. It’s that the Tories aren’t much cop at it | Aditya Chakrabortty Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:41:51 GMT)

David Lammy misses the point: to get to Oxbridge, you have to apply first | Ellie Gomes
Oxbridge’s lack of diversity is a problem. But if students from low-income backgrounds aren’t pointed in the right direction, how will things change?David Lammy’s revelation about Oxbridge’s “apartheid” raises many pertinent issues, but yet fundamentally misses the point. As a current third-year student at Keble College of ethnic minority and state school background, I would argue that while the statistics presented are shocking, Oxford is not solely to blame. Related: Seven years have changed nothing at Oxbridge. In fact, diversity is even worse | David Lammy Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:00:13 GMT)

Owning a car will soon be a thing of the past | John Harris
The idea that we will surrender our prized motors can look far-fetched. But as cities clamp down on vehicle use, technology is putting a utopian vision in reachIf ours is an age in which no end of institutions and conventions are being disrupted, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that one of the most basic features of everyday life seems under serious threat. If you are fortunate enough to live in a house with a drive, look outside and you will probably see it: that four-wheeled metal box, which may well be equipped with every technological innovation imaginable, but now shows distinct signs of obsolescence. Related: The car has a chokehold on Britain. It’s time to free ourselves | George Monbiot Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:11 GMT)

If Hammond won’t borrow to build the future, May needs a chancellor who will | Tim Montgomerie
Theresa May promised the people real reform and then appointed a chancellor who has delivered inertia. He is running out of time – and so are the ToriesThere are lots of candidates for Theresa May’s worst decision since becoming prime minister, but one of her biggest mistakes was also the most inexplicable. Inexplicable because her speech on the steps of Downing Street, immediately after succeeding David Cameron, suggested that she did “get it”. Related: Calling Philip Hammond a ‘saboteur’ or ‘traitor’ reflects terribly on the Tory right | Kate Maltby Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:11 GMT)

Finally, the truth about just how manipulative your dog really is | Felicity Cloake
Our pets have specific expressions they reserve for humans, it’s been revealed. But as a dog owner, I have to say that news comes as no surprise to meSitting at my desk, I stealthily peel open a packet of biscuits, hardly daring to breathe as I carefully reach inside. Even as my fingers close triumphantly around the coveted malted milk, the clip-clip of claws in the hall announces my failure. A small furry beast trots into my line of vision and arranges itself patiently by my feet. When eventually, biscuit disposed of, I dare to turn my head to meet its burning eyes, the dog cocks his head winsomely to one side, and, on cue, my heart melts. Once again, he’s played me like a fiddle, and without even opening his mouth.Dealing with such blatant emotional manipulation on a daily basis, I was unsurprised by the news that dogs use their facial expressions to interact with the human world. A study recently published in the journal Scientific Reports found that dogs move their faces far more when humans are looking at them than otherwise, suggesting that those expressions are attempts to communicate with us – though the scientists involved were keen to emphasise that they don’t know exactly what the dogs are trying to say. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:00:15 GMT)

Nicola Jennings on the standoff between Spain and Catalonia – cartoon
Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:22:12 GMT)

How I stopped worrying and learned to love Brexit | Arwa Mahdawi
After a year and a half of remoaning, I’ve decided to blindly follow our wise leaders to a post-EU wonderland. It’s as if a 350m-tonne weight has suddenly been liftedIt’s taken a while but I’ve finally seen the light. After months of relentless remoaning, I’ve realised that, actually, this whole Brexit business isn’t such a bad idea after all. In fact, I’ve decided Brexit is brilliant. And you know what? Letting go of my elitist reservations and embracing Brexit was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.As soon as I climbed aboard the Brexit bus, I felt liberated; it was as if a 350m-tonne weight had been lifted. I gave up uselessly fretting about the future of Britain, the country where I was born – and where I feel very lucky to have been born – and which I love. Patriotism, I realised, isn’t wanting the best for your country, it’s blindly trusting politicians to do what’s best for your country. Ours is not to reason why, ours is but to do and die, and all that. Anyway, it was like magic: as soon as I understood what being a patriot really means, I felt a lot happier about life, the EUniverse and everything. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 13:00:06 GMT)

How many dead Somalis does it take for us to care? | Nadifa Mohamed
Last weekend’s truck bombing in Mogadishu took 358 lives. London, it seems, couldn’t even be bothered to lower a flagFor over a week now, since the shocking attack that killed hundreds of people in Mogadishu, I’ve been seeking to raise money for the only free ambulance service in the Somali capital. But as the days have gone I’ve noticed just how muted the public and official response has been to what – with 358 dead, 56 missing and 228 injured – must count among the world’s worst terror atrocities. Related: Mogadishu truck bomb: 500 casualties in Somalia’s worst terrorist attack Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:12 GMT)

The Guardian view on the fall of Raqqa: as Isis loses, Iran wins | Editorial
A swirling reorientation of alliances and enmities is under way in Syria and Iraq. The region is suffering a devastation that bears comparison with the thirty years’ warRaqqa, self-styled capital of the self-styled Islamic State’s self-styled caliphate in eastern Syria, fell to Kurdish and Sunni Arab forces last week. The event was an indisputable success for the US-led anti-Isis international coalition. For the city’s inhabitants, it meant the end of a terrifying three years under the rule of a nihilistic cult. Isis’s rule in Raqqa made a global statement, showcasing its atrocities and its ideology: there were beheadings in a sports stadium, gay men thrown off rooftops, women reduced to slavery, and children indoctrinated to become suicide bombers. That the insurgent group has now been kicked out is a piece of good news for the Middle East and beyond.It is much too soon to claim that Isis has been beaten for good. It still holds pockets of territory across the Syria-Iraq border. Nor is Sunni disenfranchisement – a key recruiting sergeant for Isis – likely to disappear if the Syrian dictator, Bashar al-Assad, is allowed to continue to persecute his people. Donald Trump’s assertion on Saturday that the fall of Raqqa heralded a political transition for Syria is both cynical and hollow. There is no sign whatever of such a transition in Damascus. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 18:08:22 GMT)

'Why should newspapers not be accountable?'
To mark the 20th anniversary of the Guardian readers’ editor role, the incumbent asked his three predecessors to recall their time in the post. Ian Mayes was the firstI became the Guardian’s, and the UK’s, first readers’ editor, or resident ombudsman, on 5 November – fireworks night – 1997.There had been attempts at various forms of self-regulation in the past but nothing quite like this. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 15:54:04 GMT)

Nivea's latest 'white is right' advert is the tip of a reprehensible iceberg
No amount of sophisticated branding can hide the fact that the messaging of such ads is as deeply poisonous as ever“Now I have visibly fairer skin, making me feel younger,” declares the Nigerian actor Omowunmi Akinnifesi in an advert for a new face cream. The ad, for the global skincare brand Nivea, was only ever intended to reach a west African audience, but predictably – has Nivea heard of the internet? – it has been watched and shared millions of times around the world including in the UK, where most of us live in blissful ignorance of the fact that some of our most popular brands openly promote the idea in other markets that white is right. Related: Dark is beautiful: the battle to end the world's obsession with lighter skin Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:08:51 GMT)

Supreme court to hear challenge to Northern Ireland abortion law
Amnesty International among organisations and individuals bringing case on human rights grounds The supreme court will this week hear a case to overturn the restrictions on abortions in Northern Ireland on the grounds that the laws breach human rights.The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) failed at the court of appeal in June to convince judges that the rights of victims of sexual assault and women with fatal foetal abnormalities are violated because they cannot terminate their pregnancies in the country. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:22:58 GMT)

Woman charged with murder after toddler falls from sixth-floor window
Gemma Procter appeared before Bradford magistrates court charged with murder of 18-month-old Elliot ProcterThe solicitor representing a woman charged with the murder of her 18-month-old son has appealed for witnesses to come forward.Gemma Procter, 23, was charged on Monday after the death of her son, Elliot, at a block of flats in Bradford on Saturday. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:11:58 GMT)

Phone-hacking victims' lawyer sues former employer for 'unpaid fees'
Mark Lewis, who led fight by celebrities against News of the World, claims he is owed over £1m by his former firm, Taylor HamptonA lawyer who negotiated a £2m payout from Rupert Murdoch for the family of the murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, is suing his former employer over £1m in alleged unpaid fees for legal work in phone-hacking cases, it has emerged.Mark Lewis, who became a regular on TV news when he led the fight by phone-hacked celebrities against the now-defunct News of the World, claims he is owed the money from his former law firm. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:41:35 GMT)

'Steady decline' in honey crop raises concern for honeybees' future
British Beekeepers Association survey reveals worrying drop in honey yield, with 62% of beekeepers saying neonicotinoids are to blameBeekeepers have raised concerns over the future of honeybees as an annual survey showed a “steady decline” in the honey crop. The survey by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) revealed beekeepers in England produced an average of 11.8kg (26 lb) of honey per hive this year, down 1kg on last year. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:55:20 GMT)

Car dealer Pendragon issues profits warning; manufacturing confidence falls – business live
Shares in major British car dealership Pendragon plunge after it warns that demand for new cars in the UK is slidingLatest: UK manufacturing growth slows, as bosses grow pessimisticBREAKING: Pendragon issues profits warning as consumer confidence wanesBusiness has deteriorated badly in the last quarterCompany blames “decline in demand for new cars”Pretax profits could fall to £60m; City expected £75mPendragon shares have hit a four-year low 2.47pm BST Over in New York, the US stock market has hit new record high.The average American family would get a $4,000 raise under the President’s tax cut plan. So how could any member of Congress be against it?If I give 10 apples to one person and no apples to nine people, the average person has one apple. Why are nine people mad at me? https://t.co/ezQWsReU6i 2.12pm BST I mentioned earlier that UK profit warnings have jumped sharply, from 45 per quarter to 75.Well, the bad news is this trend will probably get worse if the British economy keeps slowing and Brexit talks keep stumbling, according to Pierre Bose of Credit Suisse.Pierre Bose, head of European equity strategy at Credit Suisse said more profit warnings from UK companies were to be expected if the economy’s growth continued to deteriorate. “We need results on the Brexit talks because from a corporate perspective, for investment spending, you need better clarity,” he added. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:47:25 GMT)

Rules allowing upfront charges for foreign users of NHS come into force
System requires medical staff to establish whether patients are eligible for state funded healthcare before providing treatmentMigrants and visitors to the UK not eligible for free healthcare will from now on be charged upfront for the cost of their treatment, as rules come into force that also extend charging to community health services and charities that receive NHS funding. The system, designed to counter “health tourism”, requires medical staff to establish whether patients are eligible for state-funded healthcare before providing treatment. If they are not, patients must pay an upfront charge that is currently set at 150% of the cost to providers. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:02:44 GMT)

Blue Planet 2: Attenborough defends shots filmed in studio
Most filming done in the wild – including armoured octopuses and hypnotic cuttlefish – but some crucial behaviour had to be captured in lab conditionsFootage of captive wildlife inserted into the BBC’s Blue Planet 2 series remains “totally true to nature”, according to the makers of the flagship show that reveals new insights into life in the oceans.An octopus that armours itself with shells and rocks, fish that use sign language and tools and dazzling cuttlefish that appear to hypnotise their prey are among the new spectacles uncovered by the series, which starts later this week. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 06:19:12 GMT)

Dr Martens gets big in Japan (and bigger worldwide to boot)
Global sales of fabled DM boots leap 25% to 6m pairs courtesy of new craze in east Asia and rising popularity of new DM’s LiteDemand for Dr Martens shoes is booming, helped by a craze in Asia and new, lighter versions of the traditional yellow-stitched boots.The company, which is owned by private equity firm Permira, opened 18 stores last year, including two in Japan and one at Camden Stables in north London. It plans to open a further 20 to 25 shops this year in Japan, continental Europe, the UK and the US. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:18:44 GMT)

Public backs ban on long-term unpaid internships, study finds
New research by the Social Mobility Commission also found 80% in favour of requiring firms to advertise opportunitiesA majority of people support a ban on long-term unpaid internships and the introduction of new rules preventing companies from organising short-term spots via informal channels, a study suggests.The research was released by the Social Mobility Commission on Monday, as parliamentarians prepared to debate a bill proposing a ban on work experience placements lasting more than four weeks. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:45:07 GMT)

Tributes paid to British woman killed in French boat accident
Victim, understood to be Jess Wilkes, 27, was flung from boat as it travelled on Rhone river near city of Avignon on Saturday night Tributes have been paid to a British mother killed in a boat accident in southern France.The victim, understood to be Jess Wilkes, 27, was flung from the craft as it travelled on the Rhone near the city of Avignon on Saturday night. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:21:32 GMT)

Don't ask GPs for antibiotics, new health campaign urges
Public can play critical role in helping avoid ‘post-antibiotic apocalypse’, says England’s chief medical officer, Dame Sally DaviesPeople are being urged not to ask their doctor for antibiotics as part of a new campaign aimed at tackling growing resistance to the drugs.An estimated 5,000 people die every year in England because antibiotics no longer work for some infections, according to Public Health England (PHE), which has launched the Keep Antibiotics Working campaign. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 04:16:20 GMT)

Police resume landfill search for missing RAF serviceman Corrie McKeague
Suffolk police called off search in July but are returning to site after deciding it is the most likely place to find himA police force is resuming a search of a landfill site in an effort to find a missing RAF serviceman, Corrie McKeague, after calling off the hunt three months ago.McKeague, 23, vanished after a night out with friends in Bury St Edmunds last year. He was last seen on CCTV in the early hours of 24 September walking into a bin loading bay in Brentgovel Street. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:34:28 GMT)

Nuneaton bowling alley hostage situation described by witnesses – video
Police stormed a Warwickshire bowling alley on Sunday after a gunman entered the building and took two hostages. Witnesses describe a man with a shotgun shouting ‘game over’ before the arrival of the police, who quickly stormed the alley and arrested the gunman Police storm bowling alley in Nuneaton to bring hostage situation to an end Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:45:36 GMT)

Craft beer boom pushes number of UK breweries past 2,000
More than 300 brewers opened in 2016, in reversal of much-criticised consolidation of beer trade over past 70 yearsMore than 300 new breweries were launched in the UK last year as a boom in craft beer sales encouraged startups with specialist offers ranging from gluten-free beer to ale made from leftover bread. Growth in sales of craft beer in both pubs and supermarkets has encouraged more people interested in home brewing to raise money and open their own microbreweries. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:01:11 GMT)

UK energy firms call on chancellor to boost carbon tax
SSE and Drax tell Philip Hammond they need longer-term clarity on price floor if they are to replace coal power plantsTwo of Britain’s biggest energy companies have called on Philip Hammond to strengthen a carbon tax that has driven a dramatic collapse in coal power generation, arguing it is essential for the shift to cleaner energy.SSE, the UK’s second largest energy supplier, and Drax, which runs the country’s biggest power station in North Yorkshire, urged the chancellor to use his autumn budget to shed light on the tax’s fate into the 2020s. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:01:11 GMT)

Donald Trump's sexual harassment accusers hope president goes way of Weinstein
Three of the women who accused Trump of making unwanted sexual advances feel the culture may finally change but worry about men’s relative silenceAs the aftershocks from Harvey Weinstein’s alleged sexual misconduct spread to other powerful men in Hollywood and media, a group of women for whom the allegations are “gross but familiar” are wondering if the fallout will reach an even more powerful man – the one in the White House.During the course of his presidential campaign, more than 10 women came forward with accusations that Donald Trump had touched or kissed them without consent – something he bragged about on the infamous 2005 Access Hollywood tape when he said stars like him could “grab them by the pussy”. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:46:47 GMT)

What now for Japan after Abe's landslide election victory?
Experts give their views on where Japan is headed after a sweeping win for the incumbent prime ministerAfter Shinzo Abe’s crushing defeat of the opposition in Sunday’s election five Japan experts give their views on what lies ahead for the country – and the region. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 06:23:05 GMT)

Northern Italy regions overwhelmingly vote for greater autonomy
Voters in Veneto, which includes Venice, and Lombardy, home to Milan, back further devolution from Rome, say regional leadersTwo of Italy’s wealthiest northern regions on Sunday voted overwhelmingly in favour of greater autonomy in the latest example of the powerful centrifugal forces reshaping European politics.Voters in the Veneto region that includes Venice, and Lombardy, home to Milan, backed more powers being devolved from Rome in votes that took place against the backdrop of the crisis created by Catalonia’s push for independence. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 01:11:41 GMT)

Post-hurricane cleanup work could kill more workers than storms themselves
The two hurricanes that battered Texas and Florida left 200 people dead but neglect of health and safety among mainly day laborers could exact a great tollMore workers could die from the long-term effects of cleaning up after hurricanes Harvey and Irma than were killed by the storms, according to a nationwide network of workplace health and safety groups. The mainland US death toll for the two hurricanes, which battered Texas and Florida in August and September, now stands at approximately 200 people. But according to Jessica Martinez, executive director of National Council of Occupation Safety and Health (Cosh), a nationwide network of workplace health and safety groups, a greater number of people will die cleaning up in their wake “if more resources aren’t put into health and safety training from post-cleanup”. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:00:08 GMT)

Calais: hundreds of migrants remain a year after razing of camp
Site now barren land with nowhere to shelter but Help Refugees charity has been forbidden from giving out tentsHundreds of refugees and migrants are believed to be in Calais and the surrounding area, a year after the refugee camp there was razed.It is thought between 700 and 800 people are gathered in France’s northern port town, which continues to attract those hoping to start a new life in the UK. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 23:01:04 GMT)

Indonesia demands answers after military chief refused entry to US
Gen Gatot Nurmantyo was invited to attend counter-extremism conference but was told he could not board flightIndonesia has said an apology from the US after its military chief was denied entry at the weekend does not go far enough.Gen Gatot Nurmantyo and his entourage were scheduled to travel from Jakarta to Washington on Saturday afternoon but were informed by airline staff just before boarding that US customs and border protection had blocked their entry. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:20:36 GMT)

Kaspersky: security firm tries to win back trust after Russian spying scandal
New transparency initiative aims to open up software and security practices to independent auditors to prove firm’s antivirus program is safe Cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab has launched a “global transparency initiative” in an attempt to win back trust and prove it is safe to use after allegations of Russian spying.The initiative will begin with an independent review of Kaspersky’s source code, an independent assessment of its own security practices, and the creation of new data protection controls for its handling of secure data, also independently overseen. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:00:13 GMT)

Malta: thousands rally to demand justice for murdered journalist
Anti-corruption blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia was killed in a car bombing last weekThousands of people flocked to a rally on Sunday to demand justice for murdered Maltese journalist and anti-corruption blogger Daphne Caruana Galizia.Crowds packed roads in the capital Valletta as the “national demonstration for justice” began in honour of the 53-year-old, killed in a car bombing on Monday. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 23:41:53 GMT)

Unknown local wins Venice marathon after favourites take wrong turn
Eyob Faniel wins Venice marathon after bizarre incident in which leading runners followed a motorcycle off courseItalian Eyob Faniel won the Venice marathon on Sunday after a bizarre incident in which the leading six runners took a wrong turn.Favorites Abdulahl Dawud, Gilbert Kipleting Chumba, Kipkemei Mutai and David Kiprono Metto were among the leading group 25km (16 miles) into the race when the motorcycle guiding the runners took a wrong turn. The six leaders covered several hundred metres before being made aware of the error and turning back. They lost about two minutes. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 00:24:49 GMT)

'Spine-chilling' screams as father saves teenage daughter from 4.5m great white
Shark knocks teen and kayak into air before father and son drag daughter into boat with ‘seconds to spare’ south of AdelaideA South Australian man says he will never forget the screams of his teenage daughter as she was thrown into the air by a 4.5m great white shark in an attack the family says could have been straight out of the movie, Jaws.Sarah Williams, 15, was kayaking with her family off the South Australian coast near Normanville, south of Adelaide, on Sunday when the shark attacked her kayak. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 03:27:20 GMT)

Kenya set to hold controversial election rerun as ballot papers arrive
Despite threatened opposition boycott and widespread doubt over logistics, Kenyans look likely to go to the polls again on ThursdayBallot papers for Kenya’s presidential election next week have begun arriving in the country, in a sign that the troubled poll will probably go ahead.The final batch of papers is scheduled to arrive from Dubai on Tuesday, less than 48 hours before Kenyans vote for a second time in less than three months to elect a president. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 04:00:10 GMT)

Cub Scout kicked out of group after grilling Colorado Republican on guns
Ames Mayfield, 11, posed questions to Vicki Marble at group meetingState senator was also asked about comments on African AmericansA Cub Scout was kicked out of his group after he questioned a Colorado Republican lawmaker about gun control and contentious comments she made about African Americans. The story, which spread via social media, represents another political flashpoint for the Boy Scouts of America, of which the Cub Scouts is a part. The organisation faced harsh criticism this summer, after President Donald Trump used a speech at its national jamboree to rail against “fake news” and Barack Obama, boast about beating Hillary Clinton and reminisce about his hedonistic life in New York. Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 16:09:34 GMT)

Jimmy Carter says he is willing to go to North Korea on peace mission
Former president adopts markedly conciliatory tone about TrumpCarter: ‘We greatly overestimate China’s influence on North Korea’In an interview marked by conciliatory remarks regarding Donald Trump and his administration, Jimmy Carter said he was willing to travel to North Korea in an attempt to soften tensions between Washington and Pyongyang. Related: North Korea: CIA director says regime nearly capable of nuclear attack Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:57:12 GMT)

Millennials on screen may be broke, but they're living the dream
From Girls to Fleabag and now Daphne – how film and TV finally paid its dues to generation rentThere’s a moment in Girls that hits very close to home for many millennials. When Hannah (Lena Dunham) finally lands a job at GQ, after endless interning, it marks a huge turning point for a character who up until now has depended on the bank of mum and dad, had to calculate how long she could survive without buying lunch, and recently considered a job in McDonald’s for the free fries. “This is how much money I make a week? This is a lot more than my rent. This is insane, I’m just gonna like walk into a store in the Meatpacking District and make it rain!” It’s a line that at once encapsulates not only how much of their salary Generation Y are used to parting with to cover rising rental costs, but also their first instinct on what to do with whatever’s left over – splurge.In the halcyon days of the 1990s we liked our films and TV shows to be as “aspirational” (read: unrealistic) as possible, with not a whiff of financial struggle. Things could only get better, after all. It’s now a well-worn trope to question how an out-of-work actor and a waitress could afford those vast Manhattan apartments in Friends – maybe Joey and Rachel had trust funds they just didn’t talk about? While Sex and the City fans have long puzzled over how Carrie “I like my money where I can see it – in my closet” Bradshaw funded her lifestyle of Cosmopolitans and Manolos with a single weekly column. So much so that one website even did the “Carrie Bradshaw Maths” to calculate that she’d now be $3tn in debt. That’s a lot of shoes. Continue reading...
(Wed, 11 Oct 2017 16:41:33 GMT)

Inside the world’s largest co-living space: ‘You’ve got a whole community under one roof’
When Tjalling van den Burger accepted a job in London, he needed to find a place to live – and like a growing number of young people faced with sky high rents, he turned to co-living. So what’s it like sharing a communal space with more than 500 people?“Searching for a flatshare in London while still living in the Netherlands was almost impossible,” says Tjalling van den Burger. He had accepted a job with a tech company in London and was faced with the daunting prospect of arriving with nowhere to live – until a friend recommended he try The Collective.A sleek 10-storey tower in Old Oak, west London, The Collective claims to be the world’s largest co-living scheme, with about 550 residents. It aims to give tenants, whose average age is 28, a communal life, with every aspect – from utility bills to entertainment – taken care of. It’s much like a university halls of residence for young professionals, albeit a very luxurious one. Continue reading...
(Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:52:10 GMT)

Generation rent: how did we get here and where might we end up?
Co-living is catching on among twentysomethings, attracted by chance to live with like-minded people in properties to be proud of Owning her own home was never a dream for Lyndsey Yates. The freelance graphic designer and her partner Mark, a web designer, have always hankered after something more flexible, more exotic. “When we first got together we were convinced we would never buy a house because we wanted our freedom, to move around wherever we wanted to,” she says. They both had good careers. Freelancing gave them flexibility. Life in Spain or Switzerland looked like fun. “At one point we were learning Dutch because we were thinking of moving to Holland.” Continue reading...
(Wed, 11 Oct 2017 16:41:21 GMT)

Generation rent: how are you adjusting to the ‘new normal’?
Have you been creative with your career or embraced shared living to navigate your way through the challenging financial landscape? Share your solutions by filling in this formThere used to be a “normal” financial lifecycle. You got a student account, a graduate loan, saved up to get married, got a mortgage to buy a house and then got a pension to enjoy it all when you retired.But for a generation of rising metropolitans in generation rent, it can feel like you’re doing everything in a different order – if you’re even thinking about these traditional life markers at all. Continue reading...
(Wed, 11 Oct 2017 16:41:24 GMT)

Catalan president says his people will not accept direct rule from Madrid - video
Carles Puigdemont says Catalans will not accept the Spanish government's plans to impose direct rule on the region. He describes it as the worst attack on Catalonia's institutions since General Franco's 1939 to 1975 dictatorship, under which autonomy was dissolved. He says Mariano Rajoy's government is acting against the democratic will of the Catalan people by refusing all offers of dialogue, and that he will call for a session of the regional parliament to debate a response to the Spanish prime minister's plans. Police say 450,000 people took part in protests in Barcelona  on SaturdayCatalan separatists prepare for war of attrition against Madrid Continue reading...
(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:18:58 GMT)

Hillary Clinton talks about Trump's inauguration on the Graham Norton Show - video
The almost-holder of the US presidency tells The Graham Norton Show how she didn't feel like attending Donald Trump's inauguration in her role as a former first lady, and jokes about George W Bush's reaction to her campaign rival's speech• Watch the entire interview on The Graham Norton Show• Why does nobody mention that Hillary Clinton is perfectly nice? Continue reading...
(Sat, 21 Oct 2017 08:21:42 GMT)

Who is Jacinda Ardern? – video explainer
Jacinda Ardern has become New Zealand’s youngest prime minister, 26 days after the country went to the polls. The kingmaker, Winston Peters, said on Thursday that his New Zealand First party would support Ardern’s Labour party to create a coalition, displacing Bill English’s National party.Jacinda Ardern to be New Zealand's next PM after Labour coalition deal Continue reading...
(Thu, 19 Oct 2017 14:11:45 GMT)

'He was slippery like a snake': Katy Tur on covering Donald Trump's lies - video
The journalist Katy Tur's new book focuses on the balancing act that is covering Donald Trump. Here, she talks about what he wants most of all: to be loved, feted and celebrated• 'Come here, Katy': how Donald Trump turned me into a target Continue reading...
(Wed, 18 Oct 2017 12:39:07 GMT)

Armando Iannucci on The Death of Stalin, Donald Trump and disappearing democracy – video interview
Backstabbing and deceit are the order of the day in the Veep creator’s historical satire, which stars Steve Buscemi, Michael Palin, Andrea Riseborough, Simon Russell Beale and Jason Isaacs as underlings vying for power in the wake of the Soviet dictator’s death. Its creator and cast explain why their film resonates in our current political climate and the parallels between Trump and Stalin Continue reading...
(Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:39:06 GMT)

I am Catalan: 'Political parties are like something from a horror novel' – video
As the north-eastern Spanish region continues the debate over its independence, we are in Catalonia hearing from people worried that the mainstream media is not representing their views. The fifth and final video of the series looks at the perspective of Isabel Muñoz Mitjana, who thinks using fear to influence people’s decision-making is wrong and just wants people to talk to each other• Follow the series here Continue reading...
(Fri, 13 Oct 2017 08:38:43 GMT)

Labour MP Laura Pidcock talks to Owen Jones: 'The DWP has caused fear and terror' - video
Laura Pidcock tells Owen Jones the Department for Work and Pensions is 'a national disgrace', saying it has created a sense of fear and terror by treating those in need as criminals. The MP for North West Durham says she regularly sees people in her surgery who are suicidalAn extended version of this video is available on Owen Jones's YouTube channelIn the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org Continue reading...
(Thu, 12 Oct 2017 09:30:37 GMT)

'They attack us just for being who we are': trans life in Colombia – video
Being openly trans in Colombia is dangerous. The country ranks fourth in the world for the murder of transgender people. Across Latin America, the life expectancy of trans women – due to violence, poverty and the risk of HIV – is estimated at between 35 and 41 years. Attitudes are slowly beginning to change, however, as trans men and women speak out against attacks and discrimination Continue reading...
(Thu, 12 Oct 2017 06:00:33 GMT)

Pickups review – Aidan Gillen laughs at himself as he turns killer in meta-film
Directed by Jamie Thraves, the Game of Thrones actor’s sketches about the travails of mid-range celebrity are full of likable self-mockeryLike Larry David in Curb Your Enthusiasm or Matt LeBlanc in Episodes, the Irish actor Aidan Gillen plays an actor called Aidan Gillen in this scrappy, low-fi meta-musing on fame and life as a jobbing actor. Gillen, who co-wrote the script with director Jamie Thraves, runs the risk here of looking like a raging narcissist by making a film all about himself. Instead he sketches the travails of mid-range celebrity with likable self-mockery. The film’s running gag is that his character is constantly being recognised as “that fella off the TV” by people who then won’t believe it’s really him. “Nah. The guy I’m thinking of is much younger looking than you.”Pickups is Gillen’s third film with Thraves, after The Low Down and Treacle Jr, two authentic, tiny-budget London dramas. Since Treacle Jr in 2010, he has become stop-you-in-the-street famous playing Machiavellian brothel owner Petyr Baelish in Game of Thrones. This film, with its feel of an experimental side project, seems to be his attempt to process that. Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 06:00:13 GMT)

Of Kith and Kin review – gay parenthood drama packs an emotional punch
The Bush, LondonProceedings turn violent when a mother in law arrives in Chris Thompson’s overloaded play about nature, nurture, abuse, parenting and gay history A play can be thoroughly enjoyable even if its plot and the way its characters behave don’t quite stack up. That’s the case with Chris Thompson’s often terrifically entertaining drama about nature, nurture and the deal-breakers and responsibilities of parenthood and marriage.It begins in winning mode as we meet fortysomething solicitor Daniel (James Lance) and his much younger husband, party planner Oliver (Joshua Silver). They are preparing for parenthood and holding an intimate baby shower with an old friend, the heavily pregnant Priya (Chetna Pandya). Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:11 GMT)

The Princess Bride review – golden-age throwback glows brighter than ever
Thirty years on, Rob Reiner’s salute to Hollywood swashbucklers remains a poignant pastiche, gloriously unencumbered by CGI visuals and gender clichesAfter 30 years, the wit, fun, charm and idealism are fresher than ever. The Princess Bride, adapted by William Goldman from his novel and directed by Rob Reiner, now makes a brief reappearance in UK cinemas. Catch it while you can. My colleague Hadley Freeman has a magisterial chapter on it in her memoir of 1980s Hollywood, Life Moves Pretty Fast, showing how it made possible fairytale homages and Shrek and Frozen and also affected the language of irony and comedy in the television pop culture that came afterwards. It’s a movie that manages to be both a pastiche and a fervently real love story. The Princess Bride is an organically grown comedy romance from an analogue age: different from the genetically modified, digital creations that came along later. And there is a specific kind of poignancy given how two of its stars have since achieved new fame in TV dramas of cynicism and disillusionment: Robin Wright with House of Cards and Mandy Patinkin in Homeland. Related: My favourite film: The Princess Bride Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:30:12 GMT)

Leonardo da Vinci: The Biography review – portrait of an easily distracted genius
Walter Isaacson’s illuminating study explains why the original Renaissance man left so many paintings unfinished…In 1482, Leonardo da Vinci left his homeland of Tuscany and moved to Milan. He had written to Ludovico Sforza, the city’s ruler, listing his impressive qualifications, hoping to be offered employment. He could design bridges, make new types of cannons, dig “secret winding passages”, create waterways and plan cities. To these accomplishments the 30-year-old Leonardo added: “Likewise in painting, I can do everything possible.”Thus the creator of The Mona Lisa only mentioned his artistic abilities as an afterthought. “What he mainly pitched was a pretence of military engineering expertise,” states Isaacson in this lavish, loving biography of the great Renaissance polymath. “These boasts were aspirational. He had never been to a battle nor actually built any of the weapons he described.” Continue reading...
(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 06:30:13 GMT)

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