You are here: HomeNews2018 07 02Article 665042

Opinions of Monday, 2 July 2018

Columnist: dailyguideafrica.com

The new regions and the fuss

Now that the committee empanelled to consider requests for the creation of new regions out of the status quo has submitted its report to the country’s Chief Executive Officer, President Akufo Addo, a major hurdle has been surmounted.

It all started with a promise during the campaign trail that when he assumes the presidency of the country he would move for the creation of more regions so development can be expanded or spread as it were.

We observed with relish the mounting interest, if you like, passion of Ghanaians from different parts of the country in the subject. While some of the reasons adduced for the creation of the new regions were convincing others were trivial and spawned by parochial factors.

We join the President in congratulating those at the arrowhead of the nationwide exercise listening to an assortment of demands. We appreciate the troubles members of the committee went through especially during the process of separating the chaff from the grains.

Finally, the moment of truth has dawned on us about the inevitability of the creation of six regions, disclosure about which originated from the President when report of the committee was submitted to him by the retired Supreme Court Judge, Justice Allan Brobbey.

Names of the regions to be so carved when the time is due have been expectedly dropped on the public space creating anguish and despair among those who think that their requests have not been met.

Those whose requests failed to make it would grumble and even sulk as they regard the development a rejection of their demand in favour of others.

Wherever we eventually find ourselves regarding the regions, the bottom line is that we are all Ghanaians who want development of our country. Let us make the best of every situation, especially since not all requests can be met considering among other factors, the cost involved.

Ethnocentric considerations constituted the reason behind some requests; these should be managed well especially in cases where requests were not obliged. Without cool heads, the subject can lead to misunderstanding and possible strife which is what we should all guard against.

We have enough flashpoints in the country that additions should not be tolerated by all means.

Now that the ball has been comfortably kicked into the court of the Election Commission, we have genuine reasons to be worried. This is a reality which can dampen the spirits of those rejoicing over the possibility that they are going to get new regions.

As a state machinery for managing electoral matters, the referendum which would precede the creation of the regions could be jeorpadised unless the ailment that has afflicted the agency is sufficiently treated and surgically.

It would not be out of place therefore to demand that work be expedited to restore the needed confidence in the EC for it to conduct the pending referendum. The commission in its current state cannot conduct such a referendum without Ghanaians wagging their tongues about the quality of the outcome.