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General News of Tuesday, 5 March 2019

Source: citinewsroom.com

Police seek injunction to stop luxury car tax demo

The police service has filed a lawsuit seeking an injunction to halt an intended demonstration against the luxury vehicles tax on slated for March 7.

The protesters had planned to demonstrate at the Ministry of Finance, Parliament House and Jubilee House on the said day.

According to their earlier statement, they wanted to drive their “luxurious vehicles numbering about 2,000 to the premises of the Ministry of Finance, Parliament house and the Jubilee house respectively” to register their displeasure with the tax.

The protesters include car dealers, spare parts dealers among others from associations like the Vehicle and Asset Dealers Association (VADA), the National Concerned Spare Parts Dealers Association (NCSPDA), True Drivers Union (TDU), Concerned Drivers Association (CDA).

In a letter sighted by Citi News, the police responded to their request saying their use of vehicles “will not be approved.”

The police, while not against the demonstration said it “cannot guarantee the safety of those fleet of cars.”

“You are therefore advised to reconsider your decision of using vehicles for the demonstration and re-notify this command for the needed assistance,” the police added at the time.

The Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) commenced the collection of taxes on luxury cars on August 1, 2018.

The government is expecting to raise GHc 300 million from the levy, which affects cars with engine capacities of 3.0 litres and above.

Vehicles with engine capacities of 2950 to 3549 will pay GHc 1,000 cedis, while vehicles with engine capacities of 3550 to 4049 will pay GHc1,500.

Cars with engine capacities above 4049 will pay GHc2,000 cedis.

The levy was put in place to improve revenue mobilization.