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Health News of Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Source: citinewsroom.com

Medical lab scientists threaten strike again

The Ghana Association of Medical Laboratory Scientists (GAMLS), has served notice that it will embark on another strike citing failure by the Ministry of Health to address issues regarding their salaries.

The medical laboratory scientists in May 2018 withdrew their services due to what they said were discrepancies in their salaries under the Single Spine Salary Structure, but they rescinded their decision after the Ministry subsequently met with their leadership and signed an MoU aimed at addressing their grievances.

However, the Association says the terms of the agreement have not been adhered to by the Ministry.

Dennis Adu Gyasi, the Public Relations Officer of the Association in a Citi News interview said the government’s failure to take action on the agreement is affecting them.

“One week after signing the MoU, nothing at all has been done. We had an understanding for which we suspended the strike action. The MoU was the bridge between our strike and the suspension of the strike. If that MoU is no longer existing, then it presupposes that the strike can no more be said to be suspended. So it shouldn’t be a surprise to the public if the lab scientists again lay down their tools.”

Many patients had to bear the brunt of the strike of the medical laboratory scientists earlier this year.

They were forced to use private laboratories which are said to be significantly more expensive.



Some of the patients compelled to visit private facilities complained bitterly to Citi News, with one man lamenting that private labs “cost more than the one in the public hospitals.

“It is very very expensive. I am worried,” he said.

Another patient said: “It is not everybody who can afford the private fees. Looking at the current circumstances, there is a lot of hardship. When they are embarking on such strikes, they need to look at the situation, consider people and be more humanitarian.”