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General News of Tuesday, 31 August 2021

Source: rainbowradioonline.com

Ghanaians want better answers on corrupt Gh₵34.8m ‘Pasco’ deal - Apaak to GES

Clement Apaak is the Deputy Ranking Member on the Education Committee of Parliament Clement Apaak is the Deputy Ranking Member on the Education Committee of Parliament

A Deputy Ranking Member on the Education Committee of Parliament Dr. Clement Apaak has slammed the Director-General of the Ghana Education Service for justifying the use of Ghc34.8 million on ‘pasco’ for candidates writing their final exams.

The procurement of past questions and office stationery at a cost of almost GHS34.8 million generated a lot of controversies.

The decision to purchase the past questions came at a time when the government has not been able to procure textbooks for the newly introduced standard-based curriculum.

“We can’t say that preparing students to perform well in examinations is bad. All over the world, there are three things that are done in schools. They are curriculum, instructions, and assessments.

"When we are drawing the programs, we usually begin by assessing them, which helps us to design the kind of curriculum that we want. We go to school not to fail, so let’s get it right.

"At all costs, it is the responsibility of GES to ensure that people pass and pass well. Our ultimate is to have 100%.”

“It is not a misplaced priority. If we were not doing this in the past due to limited resources, it does not mean going forward we shouldn’t. If we decide to make the school system churn out misfits, it will come back to hunt us.”

But reacting to the comments by the Director-General, Dr. Apaak said you don’t only go to school to pass.

He opined that going to schools should also be about the acquisition of knowledge.

”Of what value is schooling, if the schooled has no knowledge: facts, information and skills acquired through education?

"Any educationist will agree with the Director-General that the three things that guarantee the success of students in exams are; Curriculum, Instructions and Assessment. What he failed to acknowledge is the fact that the most important among the three, is ‘Instruction’,” he said.

He stated that since the introduction of the free SHS, the government has failed to provide the needed atmosphere for effective teaching and learning.

”Truth is that since the introduction of the Free Senior High School policy government has failed to provide a conducive atmosphere for effective teaching and learning in our Secondary Schools – with erratic academic calendar, obnoxious double track system that make students stay many months at home, inadequate and irregular release of funds, inadequate food to feed students, overloading of teachers with work among others.

It is for the above reasons that many believe, government started the policy of buying and supplying past examination questions and examiners’ reports to students to “assist them prepare for WASSCE or try their hands on before writing WASSCE ” as officials claim. This policy, for which GH₵68,513,455.75 has been expended so far, started with the 2020 WASSCE candidates, the very first batch of Free Senior High School students.”

He said the Director-General failed to address reasons why the government purchased another set of questions and examiners’ reports this year, at GH₵78 per set (446,958 sets at GH₵34.8 million), when those purchased last year, at a cost of GH₵59 per set (568,755 sets at GH₵33.6 million) are with the schools.

He also indicated that the GES boss should have addressed reasons Why have some schools been given soft copies of the past questions and examiners’ reports to print out themselves when according to the Minister for Education on the floor of Parliament, this materials were bounded into book form at a set price of GH₵78? Where are these schools expected to get the money to use in printing the questions and examiners’ reports?

Read the full statement below

RE: WE GO TO SCHOOL NOT TO FAIL – GHC 34.8 MILLION PASCO FOR WASSCE 2021

At a press briefing on Thursday, August 26, 2021, ten days after the commencement of WASSCE 2021, the Director General of the Ghana Education Service, (GES) sought to defend the use of GH₵34.8 million to purchase largely, the same set of past questions given to WASSCE candidates in last year’s (2020) examinations for the 2021 candidates by saying that “we don’t go to school to fail”.

To an extent, the Director General was right in his assertion that all students go to school to pass their exams. It is good to pass exams, however, going to school cannot just be to pass exams, but it should also be about the acquisition of knowledge. Of what value is schooling, if the schooled has no knowledge: facts, information and skills acquired through education?

Any educationist will agree with the Director-General that the three things that guarantee the success of students in exams are; Curriculum, Instructions and Assessment. What he failed to acknowledge is the fact that the most important among the three, is ‘Instruction’.

One can have a good curriculum but if instruction is not adequate and of quality, no genuine assessment will yield good results.

When instruction is not effective, learning will not be effective, and students will try foul means, such as copying and sending foreign materials into the exam rooms to secure success at the exams.

Truth is that since the introduction of the Free Senior High School policy government has failed to provide a conducive atmosphere for effective teaching and learning in our Secondary Schools – with erratic academic calendar, obnoxious double track system that make students stay many months at home, inadequate and irregular release of funds, inadequate food to feed students, overloading of teachers with work among others.

It is for the above reasons that many believe, government started the policy of buying and supplying past examination questions and examiners’ reports to students to “assist them prepare for WASSCE or try their hands on before writing WASSCE ” as officials claim.

This policy, for which GH₵68,513,455.75 has been expended so far, started with the 2020 WASSCE candidates, the very first batch of Free Senior High School students.

Like it or not it is now government policy to purchase and supply past exam questions and examiners’ reports to students to help them prepare for WASSCE.

But, even if opposed to the policy, we are still obligated to ensure that there is value for money in the utilisation of GH₵34,862,412 to buy past questions and examiners’ reports intended to help students pass WASSCE 2021.

It is in light of the above that well-meaning Ghanaians expected and still expect the Director General to have addressed the following questions:

1) Why purchase another set of questions and examiners’ reports this year, at GH₵78 per set (446,958 sets at GH₵34.8 million), when those purchased last year, at a cost of GH₵59 per set (568,755 sets at GH₵33.6 million) are with the schools?

2) Why were/are the questions and examiners’ reports being given to students after they have started (August 16th 2021) 2021 final WASSCE exams, if the intent is for students to use them to prepare for WASSCE and or try their hands on before writing WASSCE?

3) Why have some schools still not been supplied with the questions 14 days (16th August 2021) after the start of WASSCE if the purpose for spending GH₵34.8 million on the purchase of 446,958 sets of past questions and examiners’ reports was to help students prepare for WASSCE 2021?

4) Why have some schools been given soft copies of the past questions and examiners’ reports to print out themselves when according to the Minister for Education on the floor of Parliament, this materials were bounded into book form at a set price of GH₵78? Where are these schools expected to get the money to use in printing the questions and examiners’ reports; and

5) Why were Headmasters/Headmistresses summoned to meetings with GES Officials and the Minister of Education just a few days to the commencement of the 2021 WASSCE and forced to sign so called “Performance Contracts”?

Ghanaians still expect these legitimate questions to be answered by the Director-General.

Dr. Clement Apaak
Member of Parliament for Builsa South and Deputy Ranking Member On Education Committee of Parliament

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