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General News of Tuesday, 6 June 2017

Source: Myjoyonline.com

Fighting corruption: Akufo-Addo must be bold and strong – Prof. Adei

Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at Ashesi University, Professor Stephen Adei says President Nana Akufo-Addo will have to be daring and tough to succeed in the fight against corruption.

The Akufo-Administration since taking office in January 2017, has indicated its resolve not to spare anyone proven to have embezzled state funds.

Nana Akufo-Addo recently stated at a public event, he will not be talked out of prosecuting corrupt public officers despite attempts by some officials to use his wife to plead on their behalf.

Realising how challenging this task could be for the President and his administration, Prof. Stephen Adei said the few anti-graft campaigners such as Martin Amidu otherwise known as ‘Citizen Vigilante,’ must stand by their leader to be merciless in prosecuting offenders.

“The moral minority must now stand up and be counted…As much as we are bemoaning, we should identify them. If we should have 50 ‘Martin Amidus’, you can imagine what we can do.”

“We should encourage the current president to be bold and strong,” the former GIMPA Rector told Nhyira Addo, host of the Super Morning Show on Joy FM.

Tuesday’s edition of the Show was transmitted live from the premises of Ashesi University, Brekusu near Accra. The institution this week organized a 6-day workshop dubbed ‘The Education Collaborative at Ashesi’ which began on Sunday, June 4 and is expected to end Friday, June 9, 2017.

Lack of moral ethics

A discussant on the Show, Dr. Alex Awity who is also Director of East African Institute at Aga Khan University, Kenya, says Africa is faced with many challenges mainly due to the lack of moral ethical leadership on the continent.

“Our leaders are corrupt to hell. And this is across the continent from South Africa to Egypt,” he stated.

Dr. Awiti said the development has resulted in a shortfall in people of noble character to serve as role models for the younger generation.

“One of the things we have to really grapple with is where will those ethical leaders come from? How will they be produced? Where are the role models in society?

“Not a figure who is notable as a political leader, not even a clergy, not even a faith leader, not even a teacher or a professor, not even an ethical businessman. It is because we have no moral compass as a society,” he lamented.

Listen to the discussion in the audio attached: